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Steam's Hardware Survey Shows Not Much For Linux

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  • #51
    Originally posted by Sonadow View Post
    My bad, so it is supported.
    Also found out that Catalyst supports CrossFire.

    But still, no support for Lucid yet (the technology that supposedly allows one to use both an AMD and an Nvidia card together).
    SLI is even supported since 2007. http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...item=860&num=1
    I wonder how it performs with todays highly optimized NVIDIA drivers.

    When I enable Lucid Virtu on my Z68 motherboard I can see my HD 3000 and GTX 580 in lspci. I wondered why no one came up with bumblebee for the desktop. I wonder if it works with the PRIME helpers in linux >=3.9 and Optimus support since >=319.12.

    http://us.download.nvidia.com/XFree8...E/randr14.html

    I also wonder if the Wayland PRIME support demonstrated a few days ago also works on the desktop, when you enable Lucid Virtu. I don't see why it shouldn't.

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    • #52
      Originally posted by zanny View Post
      Only because tech is stagnated. The end game of gaming (heyo) is real time raytracing, which modern hardware is no where close to performing. To get there, we will need every technological advantage we can get.
      Except it already works in Unreal Engine 4, on current hardware.

      Originally posted by blackout23 View Post
      That's true. Intel and Radeon open source drivers are great for Super Tux Kart. NVIDIA is helping Linux more than these two, by actually making gaming on Linux possible without having glitches and shitty performance. Ideology is great until you realize that when you want to play a game getting your GPU to work properly is the only thing that counts.
      Open-source drivers are good for everyone involved. Remember that bit where Valve were overjoyed by the existence of them? That's because it's important for games to have access to drivers, so they could find out what the bottlenecks are; the manufacturers get more support from the community, so they don't have to update their code by themselves every time the dependency API changes, for instance; security holes can be patched much quicker; the drivers can use all the technology available in the kernel and in userland, even if it's created by other companies (for example, VDPAU and GLAMOR in radeon). The only issue with it is that usually companies come from a closed-source background and want to reuse their code, which due to licensing concerns prevents it from being open-source.

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      • #53
        Originally posted by shmerl View Post
        All the way if you want to have horrible gaming experience.
        For me this was true until, AMD released Catalyst 13.8 (and the openGL 4.3 beta driver)

        Serious Sam 3, which is not a light game, now runs great on Linux.

        Before these drivers I had to lower the resolution of the game, from desktop default, 1680 x 1050 to 1280 x 800.
        ( and I did some testing by copying saved games over to windows, it was not my hardware)

        Currently I run this game at 1680 x 1250 and its even better then it was on 1280 x 800 on Linux.

        At the moment I need a benchmark to tell if it is as good as windows.
        I cant tell any more by just playing the game.

        Catalyst 13.8 beta, amd phenom II X4, 3,2 ghz 4 gig of ram, had5750 1 gig of ram openSUSE 12.3 64bit

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        • #54
          @Sonadow

          If you check the latest Phoronix articles, Furmark is very much on linux. Lucid Virtu is unneeded, since we have proper drivers that can route video any way you like without some bridge chip in between - its major advantage was using QuickSync while displaying on the discrete card.

          Linux certainly isn't short of benchmarking packages - just because you can't have a certain closed source one doesn't matter when you can have an equivalent open source one for calculating pi or testing your HD. Many of them are cross-platform too, so you can compare to Windows.

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          • #55
            Originally posted by Brane215 View Post
            I think (big) part of the reason is relatively weak support.

            I was very interested in Portal1/2 and tried to install Steam on my Gentoo, but that thing behaved very weirdly. And inconistently, so after a few hours of desperate attempts I deleted it.

            Had it worked for me, I wouldn't have a problem byuing 3-4 games then.
            I do not want to start a distro war, but why not try a distro were you get better support?

            One thing I like about openSUSE is the huge forum were people help other people to solve problems.

            If your steam install fails on openSUSE, I can tell you who made the package. (which is not a package in the normal Linux sence, because it installs steam, and then steam will update it self )

            I am running steam since it became public beta. And Valve solved a sound issue, which did not affect Ubuntu, but did affect openSUSe and Arch, and prob more distro's.
            Ubuntu called some part pulse, were Arch and suse called it pulseaudio.

            From the steam forums I know people running steam on Ubuntu, openSUSE, Arch and fedora.

            Edit:
            And btw do you know why openSUSE is in this list?
            Thats because a few openSUSE users asked, why it was not supported ? ( on the steam forums)
            Last edited by Gps4l; 08-04-2013, 06:50 AM.

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            • #56
              Originally posted by Sonadow View Post
              No support for CrossFire, SLI, Lucid
              No support for userspace core / multiplier overclocking
              No support for the standard benchmarking tools (SuperPi, Futuremark, Furmark, IOMeter, HDBurn, etc etc)
              Too many cobbled-on parts to track when updating official drivers (driver depends on X version of kernel and an older version of xserver which depends Z version of some other package which, more often than not, is totally not present in the repositories) unlike OS X and Windows; install 1 x driver EXE regardless of Windows version and that's it. Look at Haswell for Windows; just 1 driver package needed vs new kernel + new Mesa + new xserver needed just for full Linux Haswell support.
              ...and so on and so forth.
              And on Windows the WINSXS folder is just an illusion ...
              And on Windows it's not like every second app carryies it's own shared/ static libs ...

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              • #57
                Originally posted by Gps4l View Post
                For me this was true until, AMD released Catalyst 13.8 (and the openGL 4.3 beta driver)

                Serious Sam 3, which is not a light game, now runs great on Linux.

                Before these drivers I had to lower the resolution of the game, from desktop default, 1680 x 1050 to 1280 x 800.
                ( and I did some testing by copying saved games over to windows, it was not my hardware)

                Currently I run this game at 1680 x 1250 and its even better then it was on 1280 x 800 on Linux.

                At the moment I need a benchmark to tell if it is as good as windows.
                I cant tell any more by just playing the game.

                Catalyst 13.8 beta, amd phenom II X4, 3,2 ghz 4 gig of ram, had5750 1 gig of ram openSUSE 12.3 64bit
                Make sure to change the rendering to OpenGL in Windows, when benchmarking SS3. It's hard to benchmark it, since you can't do a timedemo.

                I'd love to see Michael benchmark 13.8 with a couple of cards and compare it to windows.

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                • #58
                  Originally posted by CrvenaZvezda View Post
                  My X-Plane works perfectly thank you! Now only waiting to be able to use the FLOSS drivers. THEN the only instability I have with Linux is gone.
                  Try playing Witcher 2 in Wine with anything besides Nvidia drivers.

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                  • #59
                    Originally posted by zanny View Post
                    Only because tech is stagnated. The end game of gaming (heyo) is real time raytracing, which modern hardware is no where close to performing. To get there, we will need every technological advantage we can get.
                    No, it's realtime sparse voxel octrees. Polygons are so last decade.

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                    • #60
                      Originally posted by randomizer View Post
                      Convenience is far more important than privacy and security to the vast majority of people. People will either not switch or switch right back when they realise that learning to use Linux is not as convenient as continuing to use Windows. Most people don't know or care about DRM, security holes or bloat.
                      Learning to use Linux? Please, what learning does an average user need to do? Launching programs, using firefox and moving files around works just the same on an average Linux distro as it does on windows. Arguably, moving from, say, XP to windows 8 requires more learning than moving from XP to, say, Cinnamon or KDE.

                      Certainly not everyone is going to migrate to Linux because of privacy issues, people in general aren't that smart or informed unfortunately. However, it will be something that increases the attractiveness of Linux as an operating system.

                      Originally posted by zanny
                      It takes 1. A better development platform that Windows (not hard, Windows is horribad to develop for outside .net projects, even then there is no way to pack distribute stuff unless you use a service like Steam), Unity is already here, for example. 2. Games people can't get on their Windows systems and 3. New systems with Linux as the default.

                      The last one demands that Canonical or Suse (the only real big corporate pushers of consumer linux in any way, Fedora is just a red hat test bed, and Mint doesn't have a strong corporate backing) get computers running their OSes in front of people at stores. That or hopefully a Steam Box platform will pop up, and will be some stripped down Linux on the inside that is cross compatible with current distros. We need Linux by default in peoples faces.
                      Or, Intel could bring to market ultrabooks that run Tizen OS. There was already a demo of a ultrabook running Tizen OS with modified gnome shell, running Steam. If this happens, it'll probably do considerably more to grow the Linux marketshare than Canonical ever did.

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