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Unity 4 Game Engine Has Native Linux Support

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  • phoronix
    started a topic Unity 4 Game Engine Has Native Linux Support

    Unity 4 Game Engine Has Native Linux Support

    Phoronix: Unity 4 Game Engine Has Native Linux Support

    Version 4 of the Unity 3D game engine will have native Linux support...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTEyMTk

  • directhex
    replied
    Originally posted by curaga View Post
    Clearly then the Call of Battlecompany 4: hats edition fail that, as none of them is "high quality".
    Christ on a fucking bike, not this argument again.

    1) No, "quality" isn't what defines whether a title is AAA or not. Money spent is. Quality indie games are produced on small budgets; crap AAA games are produced on AAA budgets. AAA isn't something an end-user needs to see or care about, the AAA designation is something shop owners expect to see in trade magazines, and they can decode it as "we've spent 8 figures on this game's marketing budget. If you stock it in your shop it will sell well"

    2) Panda3D is not a commonly used engine by any stretch of the imagination. It's not very good for making "high end" graphics, as one would expect on a game produced on a large budget (i.e. AAA titles)

    3) "Disney uses it" doesn't make it a major engine. Little Mermaid Pinball is not an AAA title.

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  • curaga
    replied
    Clearly then the Call of Battlecompany 4: hats edition fail that, as none of them is "high quality".

    Leave a comment:


  • TobiSGD
    replied
    Originally posted by curaga View Post
    Define AAA. Panda has been used in several Disney titles.
    From Wikipedia:
    A colloquial adjective referring to the large budget in which video games are made, and is generally associated with a high level of quality. Game development studios that create AAA games are also known as AAA studios.

    Leave a comment:


  • numasan
    replied
    Originally posted by elanthis View Post
    Not true at all. Linux support has been half done in Unity for a while. They just never allocated the time and resources to finish it because no significant portion of their paying customers gave a crap about Linux. Now a number of customers do care and are listing it as a requirement when engine shopping, hence it has become economically advantageous to finish that support. So it shall be done.
    Ok thanks for clarifying.

    Btw found the quote I was thinking of:

    At first it seemed to be missing a leg on point 2 (support for Linux platform), but I knew that we could get source code and therefore could provide the Linux port ourselves. Given that the engine is designed and structured to support multiple platforms, I felt it would not be insurmountable to port it to Linux (or actually hire some outstanding external contractors we?ve used before to do the job). After talking to Unity about this, we found they?ve already been working on a Linux port, so Unity is supplying inXile the Linux port alpha source code. InXile will work with Unity in order to port Wasteland 2 to Linux.

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  • directhex
    replied
    Originally posted by curaga View Post
    Define AAA. Panda has been used in several Disney titles.
    Games with a marketing budget of more than tree fiddy

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  • curaga
    replied
    Define AAA. Panda has been used in several Disney titles.

    Leave a comment:


  • TobiSGD
    replied
    Are there any high quality game engines (means: actually used for AAA quality titles) that are open source and not based on a commercial engine that was re-licensed under an open source engine?

    Leave a comment:


  • yogi_berra
    replied
    Originally posted by uid313 View Post
    Everyone must have source.
    Why? It is useless to anyone not using the engine and we all know you're never going to use the engine, which makes it useless to you.

    Leave a comment:


  • uid313
    replied
    Originally posted by directhex View Post
    id release engine source after an engine stops being sold.

    To use your example, the 7-year-old id Tech 4 was open sourced on November 22, 2011

    All games using that engine shipped between August 2004 and May 2011. id stopped licensing their engines to others when Zenimax bought them.
    Yeah, but I don't see Unity 1, 2, or 3 being open source.

    Leave a comment:

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