Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Will Unreal Engine 4 Games Come To Linux?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • phoronix
    started a topic Will Unreal Engine 4 Games Come To Linux?

    Will Unreal Engine 4 Games Come To Linux?

    Phoronix: Will Unreal Engine 4 Games Come To Linux?

    This week from the E3 Expo there's been new details to emerge about Unreal Engine 4 as the latest game engine that's in development by Epic Games. But will there be any native UE4 Linux games to come or will it face a similar fate to Unreal Engine 3 on Linux?..

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTExNjE

  • jonwil
    replied
    Originally posted by alexThunder View Post
    Right, but that's not the point. What caught my attention is, that they're using UE4 AND announced Linux support. They wouldn't do that, if UE4 wasn't available for Linux, would they?
    What they said on their website is that not only will they be doing the Linux porting work but that they will be contributing said porting work BACK to Epic so that other UE4 licensees can use it.

    I do agree though that the kickstarter probably wont make it which means its a moot point anyway.

    Leave a comment:


  • duby229
    replied
    They -can't- profit from linux gamers if they don't release a linux port.... So Yeah... PROFIT... or rather lack of....

    Leave a comment:


  • elanthis
    replied
    Originally posted by Saist View Post
    From what is known throughout the gaming industry, Microsoft paid Epic to drop their x86 GNU/Linux support, but notably not the PowerPC GNU/Linux support (PS3). For Epic it was more profitable to accept the money from Microsoft than to sell products.
    Wow. There is no such widely known conspiracy bullshit in the industry.

    Also, PS3 is NOT GNU/Linux for normal operation in any way, though it was in the past possible to load Linux in a restricted fashion (some bits of hardware ran in a degraded mode until hacked in order to discourage use of PS3 Linux mode as a gaming platform) and some bits of Linux-associated tech (notably a forked GCC/binutils) are used for the standard PS3 dev toolchain (usually running on Windows as a Visual Studio plugin).

    What PS4 is using, I don't know (certainly not a full GNU/Linux OS, though). WiiU is all custom. XBox One is of course some kind of highly-modified minimalistic Windows-based OS. The handhelds are all non-OSes. Android consoles, for what they're worth, are using a heavily-modified Linux kernel of course with essentially none of GNU and a proprietary GLES graphics stack.

    Originally posted by alexThunder
    Right, but that's not the point. What caught my attention is, that they're using UE4 AND announced Linux support. They wouldn't do that, if UE4 wasn't available for Linux, would they?
    KickStarter campaigns promising shit they can't possibly deliver on? Preposterous!

    Leave a comment:


  • alexThunder
    replied
    Originally posted by Kristian Joensen View Post
    That Kickstarter is irrelevant since it won't make it. It is only trending towards 21%. No reason to back a losing proposition like that. It could quadruple its pledge rate and still end up a decent chunk from its goal.
    Right, but that's not the point. What caught my attention is, that they're using UE4 AND announced Linux support. They wouldn't do that, if UE4 wasn't available for Linux, would they?

    Leave a comment:


  • Kristian Joensen
    replied
    Originally posted by psycho_driver View Post
    Dungeon Defenders is UE3 and runs under linux.
    That has got nothing to do with Epic. Epic hasn't ported UE3 to Linux and they won't port either it or UE4. Any games using the Unreal engine will come to Linux due to the developer and/or publisher doing the porting or having it done under commision. I am just glad(and surprised) that going by Dungeon Defenders there is no "don't port your game to Linux" clause in your standard UE3 license.

    Originally posted by alexThunder View Post

    That Kickstarter is irrelevant since it won't make it. It is only trending towards 21%. No reason to back a losing proposition like that. It could quadruple its pledge rate and still end up a decent chunk from its goal.
    Last edited by Kristian Joensen; 05-23-2013, 08:04 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • psycho_driver
    replied
    Originally posted by mememe View Post
    Of all the games that used UE2 or UE2.5 (the engines behind UT2003, respectively UT2004), how many were actually released for Linux? There is a Mac version of UE3, so the OpenGL renderer is there, still there is no sight of a Linux version of it.
    Dungeon Defenders is UE3 and runs under linux.

    Leave a comment:


  • alexThunder
    replied
    http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/...gear-assault-0

    It's using UE4 and supports Linux.

    Leave a comment:


  • Larian
    replied
    Originally posted by allquixotic View Post
    Hopefully, we as a community of buyers will be more wary of situations like this in the future. Companies reneg on their "promises" or "stated intentions" all the time. It should be expected. This is also why I will never again pre-order anything, because if you read the fine print, they CAN choose to simply take your money and never release anything, and it's legal because you signed off on it by clicking "I Agree".

    Carriers/manufacturers fail to release promised upgrades for smartphones.
    Software companies say they'll port something, then don't.
    "Upcoming patches" never materialize for released products needing fixes.
    Entire pieces of hardware, such as VT-D (Directed I/O) on Asus P6T, never work right and are never patched.
    Companies bring a service online, such as Hellgate: London or APB, only to shut it down shortly afterwards.

    Basically, there is absolutely no reason to trust any for-profit business for any reason whatsoever. No matter how tantalizing their offering is, if you're taking it on faith that they will provide or continue to provide something into the future, you're setting yourself up for disappointment. The only thing you can be certain of is what product you physically hold in your hand. If you get a CD of a game or a piece of software, that is what you can be sure of -- but don't expect it to improve beyond what you get when you put down your money. Ditto for things like smartphones. Ditto for things like UT3, which at release only offered a Windows client.

    You just can't trust companies anymore, so if you decide to do it, you better be completely certain that they'll either follow through or give your money back.

    Sorry you got burned but it's just one example out of infinity examples that have started cropping up in recent years, and it'll continue to get worse as the bank of morality files for chapter 11.

    If you don't like this brave new world of zero trust between buyers and corporations, you have two options: one is to buy from the (few) companies that offer an actual contract stating that they WILL be obligated to do something in the future. These are cool, but so rare that I can't even find an example of one. At least in this case you could win a class action suit if they reneg on the deal. The other option is to buy from companies that completely refuse to make any forward-looking statements at all. These are IMHO the most honest companies around, because they don't try to beef up their sales with things that may or may not happen by misleading consumers to think that they're making a promise, which they definitely are not.
    I completely agree. This is the attitude I take in the Brave New World of ... whatever this is supposed to be. However this rather ignores my original point. All I was saying is that it's kind of gauche (and more than a little cynical), to tell people "that's what you get" when a formerly trustworthy entity suddenly punts.

    Secondly, a promise is not a legally binding agreement. It's a statement of intent backed by personal integrity and honor. (Broken contracts are what you take to court.) There's no legal recourse because they DID sell you a working game. But in this case, Epic took a major hit to their integrity and sullied a lot of good will on the part of Linux gamers with the UT3 fiasco. They didn't offer a contract stating the binary would be available (they just promised it would be), and they didn't break any laws. Packaging the Unreal Anthology with a Linux logo on the box that doesn't run under Linux (which was done - I've got it in front of me right now), might be a different story.

    My central point is that it's wrong to place blame on the customer for being misled. Caveat Emptor isn't really a legal defense in the United States. Otherwise there wouldn't be laws against fraud. (Although fraud implies intent, and I don't think that was the case here.)

    Okay, rambling now. I'll quit.

    Leave a comment:


  • allquixotic
    replied
    Originally posted by Larian View Post
    Well, we're down to semantics here. For a company that has always released a linux binary in the past to say they were planning on doing so again, that is taking advantage of good will and their own integrity to sell copies of a game. So yes, it was a de facto promise. The port was even done if screenshots by icculus are anything to go by. Then they left us hanging and we've never gotten an official reason as to why (other than some nebulous "middleware" problem).
    Hopefully, we as a community of buyers will be more wary of situations like this in the future. Companies reneg on their "promises" or "stated intentions" all the time. It should be expected. This is also why I will never again pre-order anything, because if you read the fine print, they CAN choose to simply take your money and never release anything, and it's legal because you signed off on it by clicking "I Agree".

    Carriers/manufacturers fail to release promised upgrades for smartphones.
    Software companies say they'll port something, then don't.
    "Upcoming patches" never materialize for released products needing fixes.
    Entire pieces of hardware, such as VT-D (Directed I/O) on Asus P6T, never work right and are never patched.
    Companies bring a service online, such as Hellgate: London or APB, only to shut it down shortly afterwards.

    Basically, there is absolutely no reason to trust any for-profit business for any reason whatsoever. No matter how tantalizing their offering is, if you're taking it on faith that they will provide or continue to provide something into the future, you're setting yourself up for disappointment. The only thing you can be certain of is what product you physically hold in your hand. If you get a CD of a game or a piece of software, that is what you can be sure of -- but don't expect it to improve beyond what you get when you put down your money. Ditto for things like smartphones. Ditto for things like UT3, which at release only offered a Windows client.

    You just can't trust companies anymore, so if you decide to do it, you better be completely certain that they'll either follow through or give your money back.

    Sorry you got burned but it's just one example out of infinity examples that have started cropping up in recent years, and it'll continue to get worse as the bank of morality files for chapter 11.

    If you don't like this brave new world of zero trust between buyers and corporations, you have two options: one is to buy from the (few) companies that offer an actual contract stating that they WILL be obligated to do something in the future. These are cool, but so rare that I can't even find an example of one. At least in this case you could win a class action suit if they reneg on the deal. The other option is to buy from companies that completely refuse to make any forward-looking statements at all. These are IMHO the most honest companies around, because they don't try to beef up their sales with things that may or may not happen by misleading consumers to think that they're making a promise, which they definitely are not.
    Last edited by allquixotic; 06-16-2012, 03:04 PM.

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X