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Few notes about Carmack's keynote at QuakeCon 2009

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  • deanjo
    started a topic Few notes about Carmack's keynote at QuakeCon 2009

    Few notes about Carmack's keynote at QuakeCon 2009

    Just a few tidbits from Quakecon, nothing linux specific but there is a comment about the next source code release.

    • Carmack stated that the source code for Wolfenstein: Enemy Territory is almost ready to be released and just needs approval from ZeniMax. The release of the Doom III source code will most likely happen sometime after the release of Rage, again pending ZeniMax approval.
    Currently Rage is set to be released sometime in 2010, but that could change as we all know.

    • Carmack says their experiment with Quake Live will continue for a while (you can expect to see new maps, skins and other content) but admitted that their initial business revenue model with in-game ads isn't working as well as they had hoped. They hope to gain more revenue by adding a premium service down the road that will let people buy their own Quake Live servers.
    Nothing about linux ports though. Notice that everything is tagged, pending Zenimax approval now.

    Rest of the highlights (or lowlights depending on POV) can be found here:

    http://news.bigdownload.com/2009/08/...te-highlights/

  • Julius
    replied
    Bump... any news on the Wolf:ET source release?

    Seems like Zenimax is not really in favour of a release?

    Leave a comment:


  • deanjo
    replied
    Originally posted by Max Spain View Post
    While I too would love to have a fully open source system, the drivers are still in their infancy. Full 3d support will come, but I don't think id should give up on Linux until that time.
    Not sure if Rage will even still be in any other place but the bargin bin by 2013.

    Leave a comment:


  • Max Spain
    replied
    While I too would love to have a fully open source system, the drivers are still in their infancy. Full 3d support will come, but I don't think id should give up on Linux until that time.

    Leave a comment:


  • bridgman
    replied
    Originally posted by Max Spain View Post
    Bridgman you've been a HUGE champion for us Linux users with the open source drivers, and we all appreciate that. Perhaps you can help bridge a communications gap in this situation. Maybe Mr. Carmack needs some assurance from AMD/ATI's Linux driver programmers that they will help design their drivers so Rage can be run on Linux using AMD/ATI HW. If you could show this to some of the Catalyst folks maybe they could get a dialog going.
    I suspect the key point from the text you quoted is :

    If you are restricted to it only working on the closed source drivers, you might as well boot into windows and get the fully tested and tuned experience...
    ... although I don't expect many Linux users to agree with that logic

    On balance it doesn't seem likely that fglrx is the pivotal issue but will ask if we can get some clarification.
    Last edited by bridgman; 08-24-2009, 02:17 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Max Spain
    replied
    Yes, it is. The codebase is much, much larger, and the graphics
    technology pushes a lot of paths that are not usually optimized. It
    probably wouldn't be all that bad to get it running on the nvidia binary
    drivers, but the chance of it working correctly and acceptably anywhere
    else would be small. If you are restricted to it only working on the
    closed source drivers, you might as well boot into windows and get the
    fully tested and tuned experience...
    Bridgman you've been a HUGE champion for us Linux users with the open source drivers, and we all appreciate that. Perhaps you can help bridge a communications gap in this situation. Maybe Mr. Carmack needs some assurance from AMD/ATI's Linux driver programmers that they will help design their drivers so Rage can be run on Linux using AMD/ATI HW. If you could show this to some of the Catalyst folks maybe they could get a dialog going.

    Leave a comment:


  • Dragonlord
    replied
    Originally posted by L33F3R View Post
    so if you cant just add more threading then what should be done?
    Be smart. Brute force solutions tend to be slower than solutions with brain. A good old saying of rendering is "the fasted triangles to render are those you don't render at all". There are many tricks which reduce the work load. But here again the problem with the dated engine design I mentioned comes into play. You have to use so many tricks that you can not get them done properly and optimized in the short TTM ( time to market ) alloted to game development projects. Hence companies try to fix the shortcoming in clever design with brute force. A battle you can't win in the long run.

    Leave a comment:


  • deanjo
    replied
    Originally posted by L33F3R View Post
    i was going to mention that. The proof is in the clock speeds. 4.04ghz for the power 7 which isnt even out yet......
    Well architecture has a lot to do with it as well, I don't think that anyone would conclude that a 3.8 Ghz Pentium 4 HT 672 is the fastest x86 processor out there still.

    Leave a comment:


  • L33F3R
    replied
    Originally posted by nanonyme View Post
    Then you need more brute calculating capacity. Again. Or figure out something new altogether. Some do think silicon is getting past it's expiry date...
    i was going to mention that. The proof is in the clock speeds. 4.04ghz for the power 7 which isnt even out yet......

    Leave a comment:


  • mirv
    replied
    Originally posted by L33F3R View Post
    so if you cant just add more threading then what should be done?
    That's why companies make a lot of money from licensing engines - someone else takes care of that little problem!
    It seems to me that most people are going the route of pooling together a group of jobs, and then scheduling them with whatever can run them (gpgpu, cpu, whatever) - but this is still new territory, and it will take a while to sort it all out. And there's what the hardware people do as well that will help influence everything.

    Leave a comment:

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