Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

HITMAN 3 Will Now Launch On Intel GPUs Under Linux After Hiding The GPU Vendor

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • M.Bahr
    replied
    Originally posted by OneTimeShot View Post
    One of the dirty secrets of popular games is that the GPU vendors add "optimisations" specifically for a game. At that point, developers not only have to deal with hardware problems, but also bugs that only get triggered by undocumented tweaks in the drivers...

    It's not surprising that a whole lot of problems go away when you don't tell the game what driver it is using...
    This seems to happen a lot with ported titles from NIXXES. I observed vram buffer overflows on an amd gpu. After trying many things in vain i then simply disguised that amd gpu as an nvidia gpu per gpu spoofing. All of a sudden the title respected the gpu vram limits, stayed below the physical vram size and did not slow down anymore. Another title was very picky when launching despite applying several patches also all in favour of nvidia. And on one occasion NIXXES even completely excluded amd gpus from ray tracing.

    As for the actual topic intel really should find a proper and more professional solution by solving the issue at the roots. Writing individual profiles for each title may result in bloating up the mesa driver sooner or later and is a pain in the a... in terms of maintainability.
    Last edited by M.Bahr; 16 February 2024, 10:52 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • sophisticles
    replied
    Originally posted by OneTimeShot View Post
    One of the dirty secrets of popular games is that the GPU vendors add "optimisations" specifically for a game. At that point, developers not only have to deal with hardware problems, but also bugs that only get triggered by undocumented tweaks in the drivers...
    Not really a secret, both AMD and NVIDIA have lists of games on their sites that are optimized for that vendors graphics card:





    And AMD actually brags that they helped develop the games:

    Developed in collaboration with AMD engineers, AMD Featured Games are a collection of the very best titles to pair with the next-generation power of AMD Ryzen™ processors and AMD Radeon™ graphics.
    I'm sure that Intel is currently working with some game developer as I type this to optimize a game for their cards.

    Leave a comment:


  • OneTimeShot
    replied
    One of the dirty secrets of popular games is that the GPU vendors add "optimisations" specifically for a game. At that point, developers not only have to deal with hardware problems, but also bugs that only get triggered by undocumented tweaks in the drivers...

    It's not surprising that a whole lot of problems go away when you don't tell the game what driver it is using...

    Leave a comment:


  • Gusar
    replied
    This is why I won't even consider Intel graphic cards, no matter how good the next generation might be. The list of games needing this workaround will only continue to grow, and I can't help but wonder if there's other consequences of doing this, like disabling potential intel-specific optimizations a game might have.

    Leave a comment:


  • Quackdoc
    replied
    Originally posted by quaz0r View Post
    Supersampling is very specifically the action of taking multiple samples per pixel. Calling upscaling "supersampling" is preposterous. It should be called whatever the inverse of supersampling is. Under-sampling? DLUS and XeUS. What terminology does AMD use for this, super resolution? Score one for AMD for at least using a made-up marketing term.
    This is only partially true, supersampling is creating a "thing" from multiple samples. It can be pixels, it can be other forms of data. This is how DLSS works,

    DLSS samples multiple lower resolution images and uses motion data and feedback from prior frames to reconstruct native quality images.
    Supersampling is not just about downscaling/upscaling, you can use temporal data for supersampling too, albiet in the terms of games it's actually not the easiest thing to do. An example of this is TAA. (remeber what I said about it not being the easiest thing to do? lol) so yes. DLSS is indeed a form of super sampling.

    Leave a comment:


  • arunbupathy
    replied
    Originally posted by quaz0r View Post
    Supersampling is very specifically the action of taking multiple samples per pixel. Calling upscaling "supersampling" is preposterous. It should be called whatever the inverse of supersampling is. Under-sampling? DLUS and XeUS. What terminology does AMD use for this, super resolution? Score one for AMD for at least using a made-up marketing term.
    Super resolution is the technical term used in scientific literature for increasing the resolution of low-res images through whatever means. But I must agree that "XeUS" does roll off the tongue nicely!

    Leave a comment:


  • jrkb
    replied
    no problem. just have all GPUs announce themselves as: Nvidia/Pascal (Windows; U; SteamPlay compatible; en-US) OpenGL/4.4/Apple (Direct3D, like AMD CUDA) Pi/3.16159 Safari/525.13

    Leave a comment:


  • quaz0r
    replied
    Supersampling is very specifically the action of taking multiple samples per pixel. Calling upscaling "supersampling" is preposterous. It should be called whatever the inverse of supersampling is. Under-sampling? DLUS and XeUS. What terminology does AMD use for this, super resolution? Score one for AMD for at least using a made-up marketing term.

    Leave a comment:


  • Quackdoc
    replied
    Upscaling tech shouldnt even prevent games from launching, why the code path is even triggered is stupid, this kind of stuff should be off by default and not care until its turned on

    Leave a comment:


  • sophisticles
    replied
    Why does this remind me of the old Quake vs Quack scandal?

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X