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O3DE 21.11 Released As First Major Open 3D Engine Release

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  • O3DE 21.11 Released As First Major Open 3D Engine Release

    Phoronix: O3DE 21.11 Released As First Major Open 3D Engine Release

    This summer there was the surprise announcement of Amazon's Lumberyard game engine being open-sourced and it being developed as the Open 3D Engine by the then newly-created Open 3D Foundation as part of the Linux Foundation...

    https://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pa...-3D-O3DE-21.11

  • #2
    I've complained about the name before. Why couldn't they just retain the name Lumberyard?

    Sounding cool gets you more users...

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by phoronix View Post

      In the months since this code has continued to be refined, initial Linux support added after embarrassingly not having this at time of announcement for this Linux Foundation hosted effort
      I don't see any reason to call it embarrassing, client side support wasn't a priority for the engine prior to being transferred to the Linux Foundation, and the announcement was about the transfer and start of the effort. This is just being inflammatory for no reason.

      Now onto the Linux support, I'm not sure a 4.2GB Deb file is the best way to distribute this engine... It'll be interesting to see if any distros take a look at packaging it at all, not sure if it's worth it. Something like a tarball (IMO) might be more acceptable for a project like this when you probably will end up doing side-by-side installs over time. Having to extract deb/rpm contents isn't difficult, but can be an annoying step.

      If anyone wants to take a look:
      https://github.com/o3de/o3de/tree/21...Platform/Linux
      https://github.com/o3de/o3de/blob/2111.1/cmake/
      https://github.com/o3de/o3de/blob/21...latform/Linux/

      Cheers,
      Mike
      Last edited by mroche; 02 December 2021, 04:31 PM.

      Comment


      • #4
        Tried to install in Debian. Dependencies unmet. Uninstall gives "too much errors". Be careful with this blob.

        Comment


        • #5
          From the docs (https://o3de.org/docs/welcome-guide/...ments/#linux):


          O3DE’s local python package, Python 3.7, depends on an earlier version of libffi , which Ubuntu 20.04 LTS does not support. You will need to manually install an older version of libffi onto Ubuntu 20.04 LTS in order for O3DE’s Python package to run properly.
          Why.

          Cheers,
          Mike

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by tildearrow View Post
            I've complained about the name before. Why couldn't they just retain the name Lumberyard?

            Sounding cool gets you more users...
            mpfffff… it gets you talkers like you that will try it 30 min at best, not new real users. When you start a real project that will involve thousands maybe millions of dollars investments, who cares about the name, compared to the quality of the editor, apis, documentation…

            And personally I prefer O3DE to lumberyard…

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by rmfx View Post

              mpfffff… it gets you talkers like you that will try it 30 min at best, not new real users. When you start a real project that will involve thousands maybe millions of dollars investments, who cares about the name, compared to the quality of the editor, apis, documentation…

              And personally I prefer O3DE to lumberyard…
              Everytime I see O3DE and "3D Engine" I automatically think about OGRE 3D which is not only another 3D engine but also an open source 3D engine, just 16 years older than O3DE....

              Comment


              • #8
                I wonder what's the plan with O3DE to keep the engine updated with latest rendering techniques that power newer games like Ride4. It's looking good running at 4k 60FPS on a game console. Would the idea be to compete with other engines by rewriting massive parts of the engine or to focus on cross-platform support and maintaining such a massive code-base?

                AFAIK the game uses Unreal Engine 4 with probabilistic surface elements (surfels) to achieve this graphics on current gen GPUs which have limited hardware ray-tracing capability, but take that with a grain of salt until more information is available.



                I don't know if there's generated (glue) code, but this is the raw lines according to GitHub.
                C++ 114206818
                Python 17679698
                CMake 2085603
                Roff 1653913
                Lua 619994
                C 527939
                Objective-C++ 275513
                Jinja 243927
                Batchfile 116461
                Java 86340
                ShaderLab 69377
                Shell 57753
                GLSL 40865
                LilyPond 20021
                JavaScript 15211
                PowerShell 15175
                Objective-C 14080
                HTML 11626
                HLSL 1700
                CSS 1534
                Mathematica 788
                QMake 574

                Comment


                • #9
                  It's still basically CryEngine, which has a reputation for "pretty but difficult" if my memory serves...?

                  Originally posted by mroche View Post
                  From the docs (https://o3de.org/docs/welcome-guide/...ments/#linux):

                  O3DE’s local python package, Python 3.7, depends on an earlier version of libffi , which Ubuntu 20.04 LTS does not support. You will need to manually install an older version of libffi onto Ubuntu 20.04 LTS in order for O3DE’s Python package to run properly.
                  Why.

                  Cheers,
                  Mike
                  Yikes.

                  I wonder what the newer version fixed? Hopefully not any nasty security issues...

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by mroche View Post
                    UGH! This is EXACTLY the kind of problem python virtualenvs were designed to solve.

                    Comment

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