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Steam On Linux Continues Hovering Around The 1% Mark

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  • Lord Alveric
    replied
    Keep in mind that the stats can be misleading. 1% share stacked up against all the torrents of gaming kiddies out there who simply use the default OS that came with their computers. Why would they go through the fuss and bother installing Linux? They just want to turn the machine on and Game On!

    On the other hand, most of us who game on Linux also tend to be software engineers and developers, who are powering the Internet infrastructure in some regard, so that the Windows weenies can consume the content and online services we make possible -- at all.

    So we may only be 1%, but we're the 1% that actually matters. And I think Steam realizes this. Besides, are they not using Linux on their Steamdeck? I rest my case.

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  • remmnea
    replied
    good idea)

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  • wertigon
    replied
    Originally posted by stormcrow View Post
    GOG.com supports Linux and sells Linux games. Galaxy, their reasonably helpful update/installer client, does not support Linux. While Galaxy is useful, it's not and never has been required to install, update, or play GoG's games.
    Not to mention Lutris is already a great GoG frontend and is already working out all the esoteric bugs to their best ability - as well as providing wine versions for many of the non-native games.

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  • ssokolow
    replied
    Originally posted by vb_linux View Post
    Finally, people keep saying proprietary steam on their machine vs. GOG website. So, a storefront is fine if you only see their website and their proprietary code is on a server but not fine if the store and said code is in form of an application. People have weird understanding of web applications. Most of server applications are proprietary.
    I consider it acceptable to be proprietary in the "our servers run proprietary code to offer up DRM-free downloads" sense, but not in the "we require you to run proprietary code on your own machine to download what you paid for" sense.

    At least with GOG's approach, I can use Firefox to download the games to Linux, unpack the native Linux ones with unzip or, for DOSBox/ScummVM stuff they could only license for Windows, use innoextract, and then run them inside Firejail to verify that, if single-player games don't function without the ability to phone home, I can notice and take advantage of their refund policy.

    (More generally, I make a exception to my "only grandfathered-in things like the nVidia binary drivers may be closed-source" policy for games because games don't lend themselves well to the "perfect the design over a decade" model that open-source shines with, but I insist on sandboxing my games as a result of that... ideally inside some open-source "ABI insulation layer" like DOSBox, ScummVM, Wine, etc. to ensure the OS can change under them without potentially breaking them.)
    Last edited by ssokolow; 03 September 2021, 07:03 PM.

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  • Nibel
    replied
    Originally posted by vb_linux View Post

    BattleEye and Easy Anti-cheats are DRM for the only multiplayer games to prevent cheating. They are very intrusive on Windows and even have hooks into windows kernel.

    Valve has been working with these companies so these DRM work with proton and suddenly proton compatibility in currently popular games will grow by leaps and bounds.
    [FIX] Valve is working with these companies so these DRM should work with proton a day maybe.

    At the moment, BattleEye and EAC don't work at all with Proton. But it should be resolved before Steam Deck avaibility.

    You can check the ProtonDB :


    4 on 10 mosts popular games are not working because EAC/BattleEye (PUBG, Apex, Destiny 2, R6).

    Leave a comment:


  • vb_linux
    replied
    Originally posted by Mez' View Post
    What's BattleEye?
    I game only a little and always solo. But I want to go to sleep a bit more intheknownledgeable and culturivated tonight.
    BattleEye and Easy Anti-cheats are DRM for the only multiplayer games to prevent cheating. They are very intrusive on Windows and even have hooks into windows kernel.

    Valve has been working with these companies so these DRM work with proton and suddenly proton compatibility in currently popular games will grow by leaps and bounds.

    Leave a comment:


  • vb_linux
    replied
    Originally posted by stormcrow View Post

    GOG.com supports Linux and sells Linux games. Galaxy, their reasonably helpful update/installer client, does not support Linux. While Galaxy is useful, it's not and never has been required to install, update, or play GoG's games.

    sarmad There's absolutely no reason a Linux gamer can't use one of the workstation class laptops or the Thelio desktops to run games just as well as it runs hashcat er i mean CUDA programs. If you're looking at System76 hardware then it's probably a good assumption you know the capabilities of the hardware you're shopping for. It wouldn't matter if you're a gamer, CUDA/OpenCL developer, or visualization user. System76 is advertising to all Linux users with a large variety of options for such a small OEM.
    Well! Selling Linux games is not supporting Linux. They cater to Linux audience with only Linux games but Valve "supports" Linux gaming. That was my point. Also, Valve caters to Linux audience with a lot of Windows games now and does not restrict it to their store only.

    Also, I already mentioned Steam does drm free when publisher agrees.

    Finally, people keep saying proprietary steam on their machine vs. GOG website. So, a storefront is fine if you only see their website and their proprietary code is on a server but not fine if the store and said code is in form of an application. People have weird understanding of web applications. Most of server applications are proprietary.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mez'
    replied
    Originally posted by aufkrawall View Post
    It will be hard to get higher without reliable Easy Anti-Cheat and BattleEye support. While they are stupid placebos vs. less intrusive solutions, lots of games that are played a lot require them. Also D3D12 games still need compatibility improvements. While a lot of them quickly work fine, others remain broken for too long.
    What's BattleEye?
    I game only a little and always solo. But I want to go to sleep a bit more intheknownledgeable and culturivated tonight.
    Last edited by Mez'; 03 September 2021, 06:42 AM.

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  • CTown
    replied
    Originally posted by sarmad View Post
    One of the main blockers for more Linux adoption right now is the lack of decent gaming machines. As of right now, there isn't actually ANY gaming laptop in the market that works well with Linux; all available options are with nVidia GPUs that neither work with Wayland, nor works properly in a hybrid GPU setup. You either have to bypass the iGPU completely at the expense of heat and battery life, or use the iGPU and give up the external monitors that are connected to the dGPU. I'm not sure why Linux hardware manufacturers like System76 and Tuxedo couldn't provide any decent gaming machines after all these years.
    I agree (except for System76 and Tuxedo part). Hopefully, Steamdeck definitely ends this chicken and egg problem you just described. It should give developers a more consistent platform to test their games on a Linux device.

    Computers are different then game consoles, since there is so many different variations of hardware even in the OEM/pre-built markets. I doubt any manufacturer except Apple could sell enough of a single laptop or desktop to make a difference to video game developers. To give an example, you can older the same System76 laptop with multiple CPU options, meaning the sales of that product do not imply a consistent base for developers to test on.

    The most I could think of where an OEM could change things would be an OEM promising the sales of their gaming SKU going towards testing games on Steam and filling out bug reports, etc. However, I would think most OEMs would then say their job is to test for driver functionality and system integration; not testing every game. Thankfully, Valve seems to be a different kind of OEM.

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  • stormcrow
    replied
    Originally posted by vb_linux View Post

    If a game developer doesn't require a DRM solution, Steam does not add one.

    GOG does not support Linux.
    GOG.com supports Linux and sells Linux games. Galaxy, their reasonably helpful update/installer client, does not support Linux. While Galaxy is useful, it's not and never has been required to install, update, or play GoG's games.

    sarmad There's absolutely no reason a Linux gamer can't use one of the workstation class laptops or the Thelio desktops to run games just as well as it runs hashcat er i mean CUDA programs. If you're looking at System76 hardware then it's probably a good assumption you know the capabilities of the hardware you're shopping for. It wouldn't matter if you're a gamer, CUDA/OpenCL developer, or visualization user. System76 is advertising to all Linux users with a large variety of options for such a small OEM.
    Last edited by stormcrow; 02 September 2021, 05:31 PM.

    Leave a comment:

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