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Valve Announces Steam Deck As Portable SteamOS + AMD Powered Portable PC

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  • Originally posted by Mike Frett View Post
    As a pessimist I must tell you, like the steam console, this will have low sales and people will just install dirty windows. If I had made this, it would've been using an ARM CPU as we all know it's the future. I appreciate Valve trying though they are beating a dead horse.
    Gabe Newell has gone around saying that he expects it to sell millions https://www.pcgamer.com/gabe-newell-...inful-to-pick/

    All I can say is that they must have gotten pre-orders for a massive amount, I wanted to preorder and the Steam site/purchase site was unresponsive the entire time due to being overloaded from demand. I am happy I managed to get one but so far the signs are the opposite, i.e. its quite successful.

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    • I see some of you are missing the point. The idea behind this device is to be "handheld PC" capable of running AAA titles. Anything except x86 is not an option. RISC-V would be instant commercial failure since the only use case would be retro games emulation. ARM, on the other hand, would somewhat work only in a tandem with Android, so you could market it like a "Android Game Console", but it would not get a lot of traction, since everyone has a smartphone now and demand for something like Android "with game pads" is super niche. And no, Valve will not go ARM/RISCV/PPC for it in the future, not unless whole AAA game industry goes this route, because they do not have enough gaming IP and studios to push non-x86 gaming handheld via exclusive games like Nintendo does.

      Anyway. Deck's hardware/software choices are very good in my mind. Only two shortcomings I could mention are: a) potential proton compatibility issues; b) 8 CUs of RNDA2 in near future potentially can be insufficient even for 720p in a case of AAAs. That's all basically.
      Last edited by drakonas777; 18 July 2021, 03:58 AM.

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      • Originally posted by Qaridarium

        as soon as you find out that KDE/Plasma did put in security holes means autostart of virus/trojan horse if you plug in a usb stick...

        as soon as you find this out and connect the dots that its the evil side who run KDE/plasma and they make CLA war

        you will never touch KDE/plasma again.
        Preach, brother. I installed KDE and now my ovaries are full of spike proteins.

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        • Originally posted by mdedetrich View Post

          You have just answered yourself, its likely that they went for Arch precisely because they are relying on sooner updates specifically from the kernel. They are using AMD graphics which means graphics driver improvements are tied to the linux Kernel version. Arch is arguably the best distro for this usecase, its incredibly fast when it comes to testing changes from upstream as soon as they are released as stable and they have a huge amount of users to test.

          Fedora would have been another contender but unfortunately they married to Gnome and tbh Gnome is kinda bad (particularly if you look at memory usage which matters for a device like this).
          Actually since gnome 40, gnome is a bit ligher on the memory then kde, fresh boot with standard install of kde on arch, my kde is 750mb, while my gnome 40 is 700 mb.

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          • Originally posted by scirocco View Post

            Actually since gnome 40, gnome is a bit ligher on the memory then kde, fresh boot with standard install of kde on arch, my kde is 750mb, while my gnome 40 is 700 mb.
            I have no idea why is memory usage on Arch different compared to other distros, as someone also posted before. I've used Manjaro KDE, Opensuse Tumbleweed KDE, Kubuntu and all of them consistently used 520-550 MB on cold boot. When I tried Ubuntu, it used 1.3 GB. I haven't tried any other Gnome distros, but I've seen Fedora Gnome and Manjaro Gnome also use 1.3 GB.
            Last edited by user1; 18 July 2021, 01:29 PM.

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            • Originally posted by mdedetrich View Post

              Maybe but this would be concerning if its a primary factor because they should pick the DE that is best for the users, not what Valve happens to use internally. Those are 2 very separate things, i.e. a highly customized DE for development/engineering is not the same thing that general users want for a gaming platform
              Well, then it's a good thing they DID pick the DE that is best for the users then. XD
              Reliable, default experience close enough to the latest Windows so that users can get their marks quick (also, JFYI, the "icon taskbar" on Linux largely predates Windows 7 but that's offtopic), but highly configurable so Valve could make tweaks related to "gaming platform" without too much headache.

              And a lot of great applications provided fully integrated (although I doubt Valve would preinstall them, but we'll see I guess).

              Originally posted by mdedetrich View Post
              This I somewhat agree with but TBH its a pretty minor point considering you are going primarily spend almost all of your time in SteamOS on this thing. Hooking it up to a display and using it like a computer is nice but in reality its a gimmik/perk and not the main point of the device
              Not for me, by far. Currently I do everything on a laptop, which is, well, nice, but I feel compelled to always carry it with me wherever I go. This kind of peripheral would be enough to do some streaming, listen to audio confs / podcasts on the move, and remotely connect to some servers for light ssh administration in emergency. And plugged into a screen and keyboard, it would offer twice or thrice the processing power of my current laptop, which was a high-end one in 2017.

              My only constraint would be, for my own development purposes, to actually learn how I could programmatically start and stop server processes "depending on context" so it doesn't drain battery when I'm using it for gaming or whatnot. I guess it would be easy with containers. ^^
              Paired with a remote free cloud for data and system backup, I'd finally have a light weight, compact all-in-one device including for gaming (I really don't care about being in 720 on the go). Maybe I could finally put a dent in my gaming backlist while taking subway or train. XD

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              • Originally posted by Quackdoc View Post

                no. I'm stuck on the fact that a piece of hardware is going to preform in real world scenarios in the same ballpark as a piece of hardware from 2015 and yet offering no real incentive other than a different library of games. the steam deck is the worst parts about consoles with little of the good. in comparing to the switch, which is a direct competitor in terms of price, and size.
                Double bullshit, big time.
                Performance will be necessarily better if only because one can actually adjust graphical rendering with game options.
                Also, while I recognize that custom hardware with paired custom toolset and instructions can lead to awesome performance per raw power...
                You are saying a hardware with low-range, 1/4 quantity of DDR4 and maybe 1/5 of the raw processing power of Steam Deck would "provide comparable performance"? LOL.

                As for "no real incentive other than a different library of games"?
                - Access to every productivity app you want (at least Linux native ones. I'm dubious on how easy it would be installing MS Office / Photoshope / Autocad / whatever else compared to classic Linux distro, patience and sweat from admin).
                - Access to games that largely expands beyond just steam (Linux native and fully ported games, Gog ported games, hardware emulators).
                - Multiplayer without added cost for online (hello Nintendo online) or local (broad compatibility of devices, so each player can bring whatever gamepad he loves), or network (it's a Linux behind after all).
                - Unrestricted communication tools (Discord, Mumble, own Steam, Gog, whatever you like).
                - Unrestricted multimedia tools (Vlc, free access to whatever streaming / download sources you like to use).
                - Ability to use as a mobile PC (something urgent to do, like a mail? Tactile keyboard may suffice, otherwise you can plug usb keyboard or pair any bluetooth device) or a full PC (put on desktop, plug usb hub which connects screen and peripherals, you're set).

                I may come as irrespectful here, but honestly, did you plug your brain before reading about this machine?
                There are interrogations and potential causes of failure: actual compatibility of steam games on Linux -and traditional proprietary apps!!- without any action required from user, build quality, autonomy and perfs matching what's announced, quality of ongoing software support and hardware replacement...
                But on paper this is an absolute beast.

                Originally posted by Quackdoc View Post
                I wouldn't consider buying this without egpu support. the apu is simply to weak gpu wise for modern TVs many of which you can get 4k for cheap. and docking it IS an advertised usecase. and comparing to switch isn't even fair considering the age of the two systems.
                Doing so would have probably condemned the machine.
                First, it would have required very extensive R&D effort to find proper external case, and ensure compatibility.
                Second, it would have added on production cost to cater for likely 0, 01% of target audience, for a device that will be already clearly sold at no profit (or so little) at least for upcoming 2 years.
                Third, it would have sent a very bad message to general audience, giving a vague feeling like "we think integrated power won't be enough sooner than later so we plan ahead".
                Fourth, it would have ultimately be wasted investment, because if one really is in the mindset of using an external gpu, it means (s)he has both the space and the treasury (especially the latter) to buy high-end ultraportables with support for egpu, like the very recent (and VERY PROPRIETARY sadly) 13'' Asus ROG Flow.
                On which installing Linux should prove easy enough if you want it.

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                • Originally posted by scirocco View Post

                  Actually since gnome 40, gnome is a bit ligher on the memory then kde, fresh boot with standard install of kde on arch, my kde is 750mb, while my gnome 40 is 700 mb.
                  700mb is absurd! There are desktop systems requiring a 10th of that and with at least double the functionality.

                  Even the Windows NT 4.x shell (20mb) puts this to shame in terms of functionality.
                  Last edited by kpedersen; 19 July 2021, 08:17 AM.

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                  • Originally posted by Alexmitter View Post
                    That does not change the fact that for a Workstation OS, KDE is simply to broken, to heavy and too buggy for being the default. No reputable workstation linux distro ships KDE by default. Thats not fanboyism
                    Hahahahahahahaha. Ha.

                    Thanks for the free laugh, it's always good for morale.

                    Originally posted by TemplarGR View Post
                    You seem like a nintendo fanboi. .
                    Guy accuses someone to be a fanboy...
                    Originally posted by TemplarGR View Post
                    You claimed that Nintendo games are excellent, which is a huge lie. Nintendo games are bad, it is just that they make crappy underpowered consoles so their games get no competition.
                    And follows with that.

                    This thread is filled with self-unaware clowns it seems XD
                    Thanks for distracting and providing us with stress-relieving laughs.

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                    • Originally posted by Citan View Post

                      ...
                      Doing so would have probably condemned the machine.
                      First, it would have required very extensive R&D effort to find proper external case, and ensure compatibility.
                      Second, it would have added on production cost to cater for likely 0, 01% of target audience, for a device that will be already clearly sold at no profit (or so little) at least for upcoming 2 years.
                      Third, it would have sent a very bad message to general audience, giving a vague feeling like "we think integrated power won't be enough sooner than later so we plan ahead"...
                      Also if they want any devs to make Deck-hardware-specific optimizations, which they AND WE do want, having non-standard hardware throws that out the window. Sometimes for user experience, less is actually more. Sounds like the guy just wants a gaming laptop.
                      Last edited by doomie; 19 July 2021, 12:30 PM.

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