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CS:GO Trust Factor Fixed For Linux Gamers With Mesa Drivers

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  • CS:GO Trust Factor Fixed For Linux Gamers With Mesa Drivers

    Phoronix: CS:GO Trust Factor Fixed For Linux Gamers With Mesa Drivers

    A few weeks ago we wrote about Mesa 21.x drivers with OpenGL threading causing issues for the "Trust Factor" within the popular game Counter-Strike: Global Offensive. Thanks to possible intervention by Gabe Newell, this trust factor issue seems now resolved for allowing these Linux gamers with open-source graphics drivers to play on the more competitive CS:GO servers...

    https://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pa...TF-Linux-Fixed

  • #2
    Imagine Gabe Newell would be under us....or maybe is. As pro-linux gamer he would definitely fit into our crowd.

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    • #3
      Why the heck is this still GL and not Vulkan with proper multi threading +optimized input lag?

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      • #4
        The trust factor problem started a few weeks before glthread was made default. it's more likely related to resizable BAR functionality. mid-December is when mesa-git users first saw trouble, roughly when mesa added support. and everyone affected was on Ryzen + AMDGPU

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        • #5
          Originally posted by aufkrawall View Post
          Why the heck is this still GL and not Vulkan with proper multi threading +optimized input lag?
          better still, the $2 million-dollar-a-day game is still on a 32-bit backend from 2004 or w/e, just with a few new features and carefully optimized maps balanced precariously on top

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          • #6
            Linux will most likely forever remain a third class platform for esports because there's no way you can verify the integrity of the system unless you've created it yourself, e.g. SteamMachine which has long been deprecated. In Linux it's far too easy to make any modifications to the system without your game knowing anything about them. Not that the Linux community cares about this one bit.

            In Windows/Mac OS there's a central signing authority, the companies behind them, so you can at least have some semblance of a pristine system when you're booting with UEFI enabled and there are no 3d party MOK keys installed.

            In Linux? Do anything you want. Change the kernel, glibc, recompile Mesa, alter shaders, game assets and code - this all can be done without any traces.

            If I were Valve, I'd never allow Linux gamers on official servers, period.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by birdie View Post
              Linux will most likely forever remain a third class platform for esports because there's no way you can verify the integrity of the system unless you've created it yourself, e.g. SteamMachine which has long been deprecated. In Linux it's far too easy to make any modifications to the system without your game knowing anything about them. Not that the Linux community cares about this one bit.

              In Windows/Mac OS there's a central signing authority, the companies behind them, so you can at least have some semblance of a pristine system when you're booting with UEFI enabled and there are no 3d party MOK keys installed.

              In Linux? Do anything you want. Change the kernel, glibc, recompile Mesa, alter shaders, game assets and code - this all can be done without any traces.

              If I were Valve, I'd never allow Linux gamers on official servers, period.
              Thank God you're not Valve then.

              By the way, tell me birdie, is there anything at all that you like or at least find tolerable about Linux and the open source paradigm? Or would you rather we close up shop, go home and be content with our consoles and Windows and Mac OSes?

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              • #8
                Originally posted by birdie View Post
                Linux will most likely forever remain a third class platform for esports because there's no way you can verify the integrity of the system unless you've created it yourself, e.g. SteamMachine which has long been deprecated. In Linux it's far too easy to make any modifications to the system without your game knowing anything about them. Not that the Linux community cares about this one bit.

                In Windows/Mac OS there's a central signing authority, the companies behind them, so you can at least have some semblance of a pristine system when you're booting with UEFI enabled and there are no 3d party MOK keys installed.

                In Linux? Do anything you want. Change the kernel, glibc, recompile Mesa, alter shaders, game assets and code - this all can be done without any traces.

                If I were Valve, I'd never allow Linux gamers on official servers, period.
                I don't see all the cheaters flocking to Linux to unravel all the cheating power you talk about. They don't need to. Cheating on PC is easy, period. If Valve cared that much, they would be working on a console-like closed platform.

                There are better ways to counter cheating, and they are constantly working on it. It's easy to behaviorally identify cheaters. Cheaters are customers like everyone else and there's no reason why they shouldn't be allowed to play, as long as they are only matched with other cheaters all is fine.

                I don't even know why I'm answering a known notorious troll, though.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by jntesteves View Post

                  I don't see all the cheaters flocking to Linux to unravel all the cheating power you talk about. They don't need to. Cheating on PC is easy, period. If Valve cared that much, they would be working on a console-like closed platform.
                  Yeah. If anything, they're going to stick to Windows to try and blend in more with normal players, rather than going over to Linux and sticking out more.

                  Any type of real highly effective anti-cheat system has to live entirely on the server side or live on an entirely locked down console. The former would probably mean a large redesign for older games like CSGO, and the audience of CSGO gamers wouldn't much care for the latter.
                  Last edited by smitty3268; 20 May 2021, 02:19 PM.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by aufkrawall View Post
                    Why the heck is this still GL and not Vulkan with proper multi threading +optimized input lag?
                    There's a good chance the Portal 2 Vulkan setup was a test to see if they could do the same for CS:GO, after all, super high framerates/low latency in Portal are kinda pointless, but would make more sense as a pilot for CS:GO and such.

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