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Proton 6.3-1 Released With More Windows Games Now Running On Linux / Steam Play

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  • schmidtbag
    replied
    Originally posted by Khrundel View Post
    I mean "moral right". For example, twitter has every legal right to ban users who dare to criticize twitter's policy, but this would be hardly right thing from moral perspective. When a shop tries to make world better by forcing some policy this is not good mean, even for a greater good. Fortunately GOG is not a monopoly and you may ignore it with all their efforts.
    I don't agree with that either. Morality is relative, and that means it's a matter of perspective. Going to a 3rd party DRM means the publisher/developer is seeking a solution where they want to stop their content from being stolen, because in their eyes, stealing is immoral. Honest people unfortunately have to deal with it, but that's the price we all have to pay because some people are assholes and ruin it for everyone.
    Same goes for Twitter - ostensibly, their censorship is to prevent hatred from spreading, or acted upon. Whether or not they're doing a good/fair job of that is a different story, but their motive is meant to prevent something that is morally bad.
    One thing that many people forget is total freedom permits anarchy and chaos. You just simply can't have faith that everyone will do the right thing, because that flat-out isn't possible. One of the reasons GOG isn't huge is because it's too loose with regulation. It's no coincidence that hate groups, political extremist groups, and riots/uprisings happen because of platforms that let people express their nonsense BS in an echochamber of FUD. I don't care whose side they lean on, such people are all the scum of society. Ironically, they think they have the moral high ground, and that's how this is all neatly wrapped up:
    Even when people incite violence, they will still find a way to suggest they're holier-than-thou. I am technically wrong to say that those people are scum, because someone will come to their defense.

    Where you do have a valid point is whether or not it's the greater good. For me personally, morality is whether your actions have a net positive effect, whether that be the happiness/well-being of others, or for the health of the planet as a whole. Sorry but, putting up with a DRM is not a net loss. It's annoying, and that's the extent of it.

    Leave a comment:


  • Khrundel
    replied
    Originally posted by schmidtbag View Post
    They very much do have a right and I don't know where you're getting the idea that there's some forced 3rd party contract. There is a license agreement that both the publisher/developer and the customer must abide by. Many publishers/devs deliberately seek 3rd party DRMs specifically because they don't want their own "in-house" anti-piracy tool. Just because you don't like it, doesn't mean they don't have a right to do things the way they have been.
    I mean "moral right". For example, twitter has every legal right to ban users who dare to criticize twitter's policy, but this would be hardly right thing from moral perspective. When a shop tries to make world better by forcing some policy this is not good mean, even for a greater good. Fortunately GOG is not a monopoly and you may ignore it with all their efforts.

    Leave a comment:


  • Kepsz
    replied
    XCOM Chimera Squad still only works with proton 5.10
    But it works perfectly with that version.

    Leave a comment:


  • Melcar
    replied
    Most games I try to get on GOG. If it has a Linux version, or is a rather old Windows only game then I get it on GOG. Steam if it's something that has a ridiculous low sale price, Windows only with known issues in WINE, or just not available in GOG. I make a habit of downloading all the installers from my GOG library and keeping them in a backup drive.

    Leave a comment:


  • schmidtbag
    replied
    Originally posted by Khrundel View Post
    My personal ethic code says no third party has a right to force their will on other people contract, so I'm skeptical about GOG's policy despite I hate DRM as almost anyone, especially linux users.
    They very much do have a right and I don't know where you're getting the idea that there's some forced 3rd party contract. There is a license agreement that both the publisher/developer and the customer must abide by. Many publishers/devs deliberately seek 3rd party DRMs specifically because they don't want their own "in-house" anti-piracy tool. Just because you don't like it, doesn't mean they don't have a right to do things the way they have been.
    Well, about 15-20 years ago you it was usual to backup game files. Now almost nobody has DVD drive to read these backups, we all rely on ability to redownload all these games at any time. Imagine GOG.com goes offline. This is possible, GOG never was too profitable and now, when there are Steam and EGS, market doesn't need third third party game shop. One or two failure from CDPR and GOG.com may go broke. In that case you'll keep immaterial license to launch game, maybe an email about purchase in your mailbox as a confirmation, and you'll have to go to torrents to download installer. Exactly same as for steam, but with lesser probability of going broke.
    I'm well aware of the situation where something like GOG going under means all your games go with it, but I'm sure they'll alert people before they were to hypothetically disappear, so people can get their copies at last minute. You also act like DVDs are the only way to go about making backups, but even if DVDs were still popular, nobody would use them to backup modern games. Hard drives are cheap these days.

    Leave a comment:


  • skeevy420
    replied
    Originally posted by ix900 View Post

    It can be easier on Steam generally only when a game works on Steam and Proton. If a game doesn't work with one click on Steam then you have to deal with that anyway or installing other compatible things like GE's proton build. So it can be a pain also. Once you get used to it both ways its not that bad. Wine itself is a nightmare of complication so even with Steam, you have to deal with it at times or not play.

    So at least to me what you're saying is you will take what you get since its easy and never really understand that thing you use. That's fine. Nothing wrong with that. You get what you get. I really don't blame you. I just had no choice because I want more games to work and I'm not big on buying from Steam anymore.

    Of course, I have many games work from GOG and other stores also in one click. Once you set it up to do so its just fine.
    Outside of Steam I normally do it all manually: setup the Wine prefix with locally built Wine or Proton runners, run the game, add any Winetricks, check the WineDB, etc. The one in a million time I try some automagic way it didn't turn out that will with a pop-under error that deleted everything when I closed it. That pop-under deletion irked me more than anything because the launcher and game were working.

    I know how it works and completely understand it when I do it myself. What you're reading is the maybe the 4th or 5th time I've installed something with Lutris. Epic Games works just fine with the Lutris site's one click installer. So have a couple of other things over the years. GOG Galaxy, OTOH, not as smooth to get setup and requires workarounds when launcher updates come (Wine issues in general; not Lutris related).

    I also figured out how to get my controller working after exiting RotN w/o a reboot. The exact steps matter
    1. stop the game through the in-game menus (any other method has silent errors)
    2. exit out of GOG Galaxy
    3. gotta then open DS4Windows and click stop (or use the sys tray)
    4. click start in DS4Windows and minimize it
    5. open up GOG
    6. restart the game

    I have to do those steps every time I start and stop my game on Windows. And they say Windows is hassle-free gaming

    Leave a comment:


  • verude
    replied
    I don't understand why people are fine being treated ass second class citizens when it comes to access to their games, while they are paying for their games others can use them in whatever scenario they want, for free. Some companies do remove third party DRM when it gets cracked, but the majority don't. Additionally, the majority of games use steam as DRM, which of course isn't as invasive as something like denuvo, but I still would rather not be forced to have to load the steam client because it's sort of bloated.

    Don't take me wrong, although I'm a tinkerer and was tweaking my games pre-proton to get them running and I'm willing to still do that, I'd rather support valve than go with gog because they're investing in the ecosystem, I still wish there was some sort of api so people could make third party steam clients as I find it heavier than needed.

    Leave a comment:


  • Khrundel
    replied
    Originally posted by schmidtbag View Post
    I don't see how being DRM-free is more ethical.
    I never said DRM is unethical. I said some people believes it is unethical. My personal ethic code says no third party has a right to force their will on other people contract, so I'm skeptical about GOG's policy despite I hate DRM as almost anyone, especially linux users.
    Originally posted by schmidtbag View Post
    All that being said, I definitely agree GOG is better if you want to actually keep your games.
    You shouldn't.
    Well, about 15-20 years ago you it was usual to backup game files. Now almost nobody has DVD drive to read these backups, we all rely on ability to redownload all these games at any time. Imagine GOG.com goes offline. This is possible, GOG never was too profitable and now, when there are Steam and EGS, market doesn't need third third party game shop. One or two failure from CDPR and GOG.com may go broke. In that case you'll keep immaterial license to launch game, maybe an email about purchase in your mailbox as a confirmation, and you'll have to go to torrents to download installer. Exactly same as for steam, but with lesser probability of going broke.

    Leave a comment:


  • cliff
    replied
    Nice job Valve! I cant wait to give this one a try.

    Leave a comment:


  • schmidtbag
    replied
    Originally posted by ix900 View Post
    You people do know that Steam has DRM free games? The argument here is funny. Any dev can have their game work without Steam while being delivered through Steam. Problem with people who don't know programming.

    The one thing about GOG is you know all games will be. On Steam, its whichever devs do it and there's only a 3rd party site that lists the games. That's the difference.
    Kinda stating the obvious here. Just because devs can make a game work without steam, doesn't mean it will (seems to me, it usually doesn't). Just because a game doesn't depend on Steam, doesn't mean you'll get a standalone installer for it.

    Personally, I'm not really concerned either way. Steam isn't going away any time soon and should it ever go away permanently, I'll just pirate the games I already owned so I can come back to them if I even care to do so.

    Leave a comment:

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