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Nearly Two Decades Later, Wolfenstein: Enemy Territory Still Living On With ET: Legacy

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  • Nearly Two Decades Later, Wolfenstein: Enemy Territory Still Living On With ET: Legacy

    Phoronix: Nearly Two Decades Later, Wolfenstein: Enemy Territory Still Living On With ET: Legacy

    It's been eighteen years since the game Wolfenstein: Enemy Territory was released while thanks to the it becoming open-source along with the id Tech 3 engine, it's still being advanced by the open-source community in 2021...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...-Alive-In-2021

  • #2
    Is there any flatpak available to test the snapshots?
    ## VGA ##
    AMD: X1950XTX, HD3870, HD5870
    Intel: GMA45, HD3000 (Core i5 2500K)

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    • #3
      The snapshots are only available from the Legacy website https://www.etlegacy.com/workflow-files for now.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by darkbasic View Post
        Is there any flatpak available to test the snapshots?
        There doesn't appear to be a Flatpak for ET: Legacy. One of the issues is that while the game data can be obtained for free, it can't legally be repackaged. Therefore, the user must install it manually. This isn't trivial for beginner Linux users as the original Enemy Territory Linux release is a `.run` file that must be made executable and launched from a terminal. The ezQuake Flatpak ran into a similar issue with regards to game data.

        On top of that, many servers host mods that only have 32-bit libraries available and require a 32-bit executable to be used. If you play using a 64-bit executable, you can only play on 64-bit mods (which restricts you to the Legacy mod in practice). Thankfully, there are more popular Legacy servers these days, but you still can't play on all servers displayed in the list.
        Last edited by Calinou; 16 February 2021, 03:10 PM.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Calinou View Post
          On top of that, many servers host mods that only have 32-bit libraries available and require a 32-bit executable to be used. If you play using a 64-bit executable, you can only play on 64-bit mods (which restricts you to the Legacy mod in practice). Thankfully, there are more popular Legacy servers these days, but you still can't play on all servers disaplayed in the list.
          That's strange. I thought being based on Quake III, ET mods were also written using the custom LCC-based C compiler toolchain (and q3asm) that output to architecture independent Q3VM bytecode.

          In some ways, I wonder if it is easier to get going in a 32-bit Wine prefix.

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          • #6
            Oh man.. I remember when this game came out, I put thousands of hours into it!

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            • #7
              Originally posted by gururise View Post
              Oh man.. I remember when this game came out, I put thousands of hours into it!
              "Bridge damaged.... Bridge Destroyed! "

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              • #8
                Wow, I still remember when this was the most advanced game you could have on Linux.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by kpedersen View Post

                  That's strange. I thought being based on Quake III, ET mods were also written using the custom LCC-based C compiler toolchain (and q3asm) that output to architecture independent Q3VM bytecode.

                  In some ways, I wonder if it is easier to get going in a 32-bit Wine prefix.
                  RTCW and Enemy Territory don't use the QVM like Quake 3 did. They both went back to native, platform-specific libraries (.dll/.so) in a way similar to Quake 2.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Calinou View Post

                    RTCW and Enemy Territory don't use the QVM like Quake 3 did. They both went back to native, platform-specific libraries (.dll/.so) in a way similar to Quake 2.
                    Oh, interesting. I wonder why? I will try to look around but I am sure their technical reasons are lost to history!

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