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Godot 4.0 Is Looking Even More Impressive With SDFGI

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  • Godot 4.0 Is Looking Even More Impressive With SDFGI

    Phoronix: Godot 4.0 Is Looking Even More Impressive With SDFGI

    While we are most excited about Godot 4.0 for its Vulkan renderer for this leading open-source game engine, there continues to be a lot of other improvements building up for this major release...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...odot-4.0-SDFGI

  • #2
    Wow.
    Really good progress !
    This is as always an impressive dev update.

    At this pace, Juan is coding his own Nanite system already ahah?

    And at the same time 3.x branch still releases some really cool improvements like the 2D drawcall opt. This project deserves a big support.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by rmfx View Post
      Wow.
      Really good progress !
      This is as always an impressive dev update.

      At this pace, Juan is coding his own Nanite system already ahah?
      Don't you mean it's Lumen system? From: https://www.futuregamereleases.com/2...en-technology/
      Lumen is a fully dynamic global Illumination solution that immediately reacts to scene and light changes.
      Originally posted by rmfx View Post
      And at the same time 3.x branch still releases some really cool improvements like the 2D drawcall opt. This project deserves a big support.
      I agree, the performance improvements of the new 2D batching for the GLES2 renderer in Godot 3.2.2 are very cool!

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      • #4
        Originally posted by rmfx View Post
        Wow.
        Really good progress !
        This is as always an impressive dev update.

        At this pace, Juan is coding his own Nanite system already ahah?

        And at the same time 3.x branch still releases some really cool improvements like the 2D drawcall opt. This project deserves a big support.
        Yeah, as far as I know Lumen (not Nanite) is a proper blending solution between SSRTGI for close objects, then SDFGI for close to mid-range objects and then some kind of terrain based solution for large scale GI.

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        • #5
          Is SDFGI rasterisation's (or conventional light rendering methods) solution to ray tracing but without the need for 100+ TFLOP compute units? (which is what the NV20 series has more or less)

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          • #6
            No I was definitely talking about Nanite the real time geo decimation system and saying as a joke that I would not be surprised if Juan made if for Godot 4. Lumen is basically what he just did here !

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            • #7
              The wait for Godot is over?

              Sorry, I really couldn't help it ...

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              • #8
                Originally posted by rmfx View Post
                No I was definitely talking about Nanite the real time geo decimation system and saying as a joke that I would not be surprised if Juan made if for Godot 4. Lumen is basically what he just did here !
                Something like Nanite is not a close future for Godot. But it's not impossible to have something similar one day. Matias Goldberg from Ogre team who helped enormously with VCTGI and SDFGI in Godot 4.0 came up with an idea how to implement a similar feature just a day after UE5 reveal. https://www.yosoygames.com.ar/wp/202...s-like-in-ue5/

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by theriddick View Post
                  Is SDFGI rasterisation's (or conventional light rendering methods) solution to ray tracing but without the need for 100+ TFLOP compute units? (which is what the NV20 series has more or less)
                  You have to remember that Nvidia's aproach is actually realistic physics wise raytracing via BRDF. Raytracing (especially physics wise realistic) is very computational expensive and definitly Godot without dedicated hardware can't do it real time. Even nvidia with dedicated hardware cuts some corners with AI denoising.

                  Edit: people confuse raytracing with rasterization light methods. Primary example of raytracing is not for glossy surfaces (you can make shader wise some light reflection on mirror like surface). Primary diffrence is that when you put a (let's say volumetric) light source in room on not dark and not glossy surface, the light will diffuse off this surface and illuminate slighty rest of room, even if rest of the room can't see directly light source.

                  Raytracing on nvidia cards is not just performance drop because of those raytracing stuff, but also because stuff you don't see have to be calculated for sake of light reflections. So goodbye frustrum culling and occlusion culling.
                  Last edited by piotrj3; 06-29-2020, 06:04 AM.

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