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Steam Linux Marketshare Ticks Up Higher For September

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  • Steam Linux Marketshare Ticks Up Higher For September

    Phoronix: Steam Linux Marketshare Ticks Up Higher For September

    The Steam Linux marketshare measurement for September ticked up slightly and to the highest point we have seen in a a number of months...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...etshare-Sep-19

  • rabcor
    replied
    Originally posted by kpedersen View Post

    This is very true. Open-source seems a little too volatile to really produce a polished desktop. The technology changes too fast and too sporadically without working together for perfect interoperability.

    Just small subtle things like missing icons in the default install, default display brightness in login screen not being restored or remembering which audio output to use per user often work for a few revisions but are then broken during the next. And when they do work, something else is a little broken.

    That said, compared to Windows 7, I find Windows 10 to have a few more breakages, especially around screen layout or using less consumer tools (gpedit.msc, services.msc, etc). Often there are resize issues causing the components to cut off around the edges. So perhaps it isn't just open-source that is dropping the ball here.
    I think it's simpler than that. open source devs don't debug and bugfix enough. They just keep tacking on more features. Most of these developers are either working in understaffed teams, working for free, or working in an envirnoment where they lack any real supervision to dictate what they do so they're free to develop things as they please, as long as they keep developing it.

    And the problem is, adding more features is fun, debugging is not. When you're given the option to do the fun, cool work, or the boring and lame work, and nobody's ordering you around to do the latter, you will probably always choose the former.

    Leave a comment:


  • tildearrow
    replied
    Originally posted by Naquatis View Post

    Arch is not complicated. Its documentation is awesome! From the first second this distribution try to keep you grounded to Linux. I tried a lot of other distribution and not a single one was able to fit my needs as tight as Arch. zexelon maybe should visiting the Arch IRC and getting an idea of how the people behind Arch made it into kernel patch notes at kernel.org to get an idea of how maintainers getting into position before he came up with such foolish conspiration ideas. Or maybe zexelon like to visit other project IRC channels like dri-devel and ask himself why some maintainers over there using Arch?

    But maybe I got zexelon wrong and need to put more humour to his comment: "Man you are so true -> earth is flat like a disk!"
    The problem is that Average Joe doesn't want to read documentation.

    Therefore Arch isn't for everyone and most will consider it to be complicated.

    Leave a comment:


  • Naquatis
    replied
    I build a beowulf cluster on top of Ubuntu till I replaced it with Debian but all my Debian and upstream (Ubuntu, Mint, Knoppix) experience ended some day with reinstallation. But what really made me stick to Arch is the moment when I need to compile stuff on my own. People like to say the library situation under Debian is that twisted because it also need to fit for hurd and bsd. Yep that does not fit into my day by day compilation needs and I am not willigly like to build my own lib repository on top of Debian only to get to what I really need. Don't get me wrong Debian is a really nice distribution, but not for every situation. Uhhh that sounds like my Steam on Linux debate. =P

    Leave a comment:


  • zexelon
    replied
    This is my favorite lunar landing conspiracy rebuttal: https://xkcd.com/1074/

    My personal issue with Arch/Monjaro/Gentoo type distros is that I spend so much time breaking my system due to testing and experimentation I cant afford the time to rebuild it frequently. I used to run Gentoo exclusively in college and it was a truly awesome way to get full knowledge of the inner workings of Linux... However I trashed my system a day before a big paper was due and I needed to get back up and running immediately... that was my first intro to Ubuntu... and I have to admit I was blown away by being up and running again in less than an hour working on my paper.

    The performance of ubuntu cant touch that of Gentoo compiled with aggressive optimizations but with a good i5 CPU and a Nvidia 1070... I have never noticed any significant issues.

    Again though the documentation developed by these rolling distros has been invaluable to the Linux community as a whole! Especially those that like to "tinker" regardless of the distro.

    Leave a comment:


  • Naquatis
    replied
    Originally posted by zexelon View Post
    Yes, my comment was meant in pure humor and not as a reflection on the actual operating systems. I personally do not use Arch, it reminds me a lot of Gentoo and I have not the time to commit to getting it up and running these days. That being said I have used the Arch documentation for a number of serious edge projects in Linux (specifically around virtualization) and it has been invaluable even though it was not directly for the distro I was running.
    Ha I knew it! Nobody would take out this moon conspiration story seriously these days. The time you invest while you are installing will return 1000 times while you are maintaining your system over the years.
    Last edited by Naquatis; 10-04-2019, 10:52 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • zexelon
    replied
    Yes, my comment was meant in pure humor and not as a reflection on the actual operating systems. I personally do not use Arch, it reminds me a lot of Gentoo and I have not the time to commit to getting it up and running these days. That being said I have used the Arch documentation for a number of serious edge projects in Linux (specifically around virtualization) and it has been invaluable even though it was not directly for the distro I was running.

    Leave a comment:


  • Naquatis
    replied
    Originally posted by tildearrow View Post

    What are you talking about? They are operating systems - just complicated ones (maybe not that complicated for the latter though).
    Arch is not complicated. Its documentation is awesome! From the first second this distribution try to keep you grounded to Linux. I tried a lot of other distribution and not a single one was able to fit my needs as tight as Arch. zexelon maybe should visiting the Arch IRC and getting an idea of how the people behind Arch made it into kernel patch notes at kernel.org to get an idea of how maintainers getting into position before he came up with such foolish conspiration ideas. Or maybe zexelon like to visit other project IRC channels like dri-devel and ask himself why some maintainers over there using Arch?

    But maybe I got zexelon wrong and need to put more humour to his comment: "Man you are so true -> earth is flat like a disk!"
    Last edited by Naquatis; 10-04-2019, 07:55 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • tildearrow
    replied
    Originally posted by zexelon View Post
    Its actually because Arch and Manjaro are clearly not real operating systems. They are well known fakes put out by NASA like the moon landings... its cheaper to fake an OS than say a Mars landing (special affects costs are way lower).
    What are you talking about? They are operating systems - just complicated ones (maybe not that complicated for the latter though).

    Leave a comment:


  • tildearrow
    replied
    Originally posted by skeevy420 View Post

    I just picked four names at random and put two into quotes -- two of them I know the github addresses for and two I don't.

    It makes about as much sense as Arch and Manjaro being in quotes and Ubuntu and Ubuntu LTS not under Steam's OS list
    What you did is sarcasm. You put 4 t- wait, I get it now. I get it now...

    Leave a comment:

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