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Steam Linux Marketshare Ticks Up Higher For September

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  • #21
    Originally posted by Naquatis View Post

    Well this installation thing was not that serious. But what I found about my pool of computer systems -> every time I put a new Windows machine into the network it did not take that long till Steam ask for a survey. But I have installed far more Linux systems with Steam and they never popped up a survey.
    I have a similar experience.

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    • #22
      Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
      Probably because these developers are working for server features first.
      Quit following me around dammit

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      • #23
        Originally posted by Raka555 View Post
        Interesting that the RX 480 is the most popular GPU on linux.

        It is also weird that the RX 480 is up by 0.7% in the last month, since these are not on sale new for a long time now.
        To me it indicates that the trends of the survey is kind of lagging approx 2 years behind or linux users are buying up all the old RX 480s ...
        It doesn't surprise me, the RX 480 works "Perfectly" on Linux with AMDGPU + Radeon, both Desktop and GL + Vulkan performance is excellent.

        I've had previously a R9 290 and it was a living nightmare, since I got my 480 gaming on Linux is bliss.

        When it came upgrading my secondary computer, I bought a second RX 480 on ebay because I prefer 10-20 less fps with a smooth sailing rather than "the greatest" RX 5XX which runs fine only 6 months to a year after release.

        The RX480 currently provides one of the most solid gaming experiences in Linux.
        Last edited by JPFSanders; 10-02-2019, 09:13 AM.

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        • #24
          Originally posted by skeevy420 View Post

          I have to assume that's partly because the RX 5*0 cards tend to be reported as RX 4*0.

          RX 480s and 580s are damn good cards for a combination of value, Linux compatibility, guaranteed long-term Linux support, guaranteed major desktop environment performance and support, gaming performance, computing standards support, they both over and under clock very good, and they're mature enough that most major bugs have been squashed. IMHO, they're the best AMD cards for a 1080p Linux desktop that also plays games.
          It would make much more sense if this is the case.

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          • #25
            Originally posted by Raka555 View Post

            It would make much more sense if this is the case.
            I know from personal experience that my RX 580 is reported as a 480 when I'm using RADV and it's a 580 with AMDVLK. Since I'm assuming that most people use RADV, it's a theory that makes sense.

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            • #26
              Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
              Probably because these developers are working for server features first.
              I am fully fine with that. It take me a long time to use systems for what they are good at. The fact you having a hammer in your hand did not automatically means everything is a nail.

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              • #27
                Originally posted by rabcor View Post
                Thousands of developers, and we still can't get a 100% reliable desktop experience, I mean we're close, we've always been close, but nobody's ever closed that last gap.
                Unfortunately, it is very true. I have core dumps enabled for all applications and I am seeing several new core files per week belonging to XFCE desktop executables (such as core.xfdesktop.pid). Previously with KDE it was the same: a few core dumps from crashed KDE applications per week. It is similar in case of the current Steam-beta: a new core dump is created every time Steam is started (core.vulkandriverque.pid). With ROCm 2.6 and Linux kernel 5.3.0, clinfo always immediately crashed and generated a core dump without printing any kind of error message.

                This most likely requires a radical change in how Linux software is being created in order to resolve these issues, such as turning away from languages like C/C++ or adding a very deep compile-time code correctness analysis to C/C++ compilers or enabling developers to have installed a sample of software configurations/combinations that are different from the developer's default software combination.

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                • #28
                  Originally posted by kpedersen View Post

                  This is very true. Open-source seems a little too volatile to really produce a polished desktop. The technology changes too fast and too sporadically without working together for perfect interoperability.

                  Just small subtle things like missing icons in the default install, default display brightness in login screen not being restored or remembering which audio output to use per user often work for a few revisions but are then broken during the next. And when they do work, something else is a little broken.

                  That said, compared to Windows 7, I find Windows 10 to have a few more breakages, especially around screen layout or using less consumer tools (gpedit.msc, services.msc, etc). Often there are resize issues causing the components to cut off around the edges. So perhaps it isn't just open-source that is dropping the ball here.
                  But here's the key difference: Pretty much every Win32 app will still run on Win10 x64. You may have to fiddle around a bit to get them to play nice, but they still run because Microsoft will *never* outright drop support for any part of the Windows API. I still occasionally play an old game that has a DX5 (!) render as an option that runs just as (badly) it did the day it came out.

                  Linux? It seems every time the Kernel gets bumped for one or two minor fixes *everything* needs to be re-compiled against it. And normal people do not want to deal with that. Sure, Microsoft breaks stuff all the time, but they (usually) fix it in short order.

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                  • #29
                    The 0.83% September marketshare for Linux gamers is a 0.03% over August
                    I think that should be 0.03 percentage points rather than 0.03%.

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                    • #30
                      Originally posted by Raka555 View Post
                      Interesting that the RX 480 is the most popular GPU on linux.

                      It is also weird that the RX 480 is up by 0.7% in the last month, since these are not on sale new for a long time now.
                      To me it indicates that the trends of the survey is kind of lagging approx 2 years behind or linux users are buying up all the old RX 480s ...

                      But come to think of it. I bought a new PC about 2 months ago, but I am not expecting to see another steam survey for the next year or more. In this light it explains why the trends are more than 2 years old.
                      I think it has to do with the survey being kinda bad at its job. If you have an intel processor and a discrete GPU, it's very likely to report the intel graphics instead. And if later you switch to a Ryzen and keep the GPU, it will report correctly. That way the % goes up without anyone actually buying a new video card.

                      Also my RX580 reports as a RX580, so I don't think it's those cards posing as the wrong model.

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