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CodeWeavers Reflects On The Wild Year Since Valve Introduced Steam Play / Proton

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  • CodeWeavers Reflects On The Wild Year Since Valve Introduced Steam Play / Proton

    Phoronix: CodeWeavers Reflects On The Wild Year Since Valve Introduced Steam Play / Proton

    This week marks one year since Valve rolled out their Proton beta for Steam Play to allow Windows games to gracefully run on Linux via this Wine downstream catered for Steam Linux gaming. It's been crazy since then with all of Valve's continued work on open-source graphics drivers, adding the likes of FAudio and D9VK to Proton, continuing to fund DXVK development for faster Direct3D-over-Vulkan, and many other infrastructure improvements and more to allow more Windows games to run on Linux and to do so well and speedy...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...ne-Year-Proton

  • #2
    Big ticket items still missing are: Windows Easy Anti-Cheat and Battleye support.

    Apparently some improvements in Wine Staging's WUSA (Windows Update Standalone Installer) could be useful too now that certain games like Metro Exodus are looking for specific KB hotfix patches to be installed before launching.

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    • #3
      Ah yes, CodeWeavers. The company who decided, instead of taking the ethical route by selling support for a foss project they own, they're going to hold back improvements to the FOSS version for x amount of time and keep them in the closed source version so anybody who really needs something to work has to pay for it.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Daktyl198 View Post
        Ah yes, CodeWeavers. The company who decided, instead of taking the ethical route by selling support for a foss project they own, they're going to hold back improvements to the FOSS version for x amount of time and keep them in the closed source version so anybody who really needs something to work has to pay for it.
        Not a bad compromise tbh

        If only I could buy their product through my package manager. D:

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        • #5
          Now we urgently need strong efforts to push Vkd3d development, as D3D12 becoming more popular and games starting to rely on it for good performance (e.g. Shadow of the Tomb Raider).

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          • #6
            Originally posted by aufkrawall View Post
            Now we urgently need strong efforts to push Vkd3d development, as D3D12 becoming more popular and games starting to rely on it for good performance (e.g. Shadow of the Tomb Raider).
            Why don't developers use Vulkan instead?

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            • #7
              Thank you Valve and CodeWeavers for making desktop Linux what it's failed to be: a decent platform for software development and gaming. Too bad it requires a huge compatibility layer which is extremely difficult to maintain and develop since only Microsoft knows all its quirks and then on top of Win32 libraries quirks we have native Linux quirks (X11, kernel). It's astonishing we've gone so far.

              I remember Wine in 2005 which could barely run any Windows applications. Nowadays, most run and thousands of titles run perfectly.

              Edit: I was thinking about Wine in 1999 and wrote 2005. Again, Wine in 1999 was barely usable. In 2005 it already got miles better.
              Last edited by birdie; 08-20-2019, 06:09 PM.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by gnarlin View Post

                Why don't developers use Vulkan instead?
                Think! I now it's difficult but try!

                1) Most developers are taught Direct3D
                2) Most games are still developed using D3D11 because it's a whole lot easier to code for and the net result won't necessarily run faster when being rewritten using D3D12/Vulkan.

                Still, we've already got several exclusive Vulkan titles like Rage 2 and Wolfenstein.
                Last edited by birdie; 08-20-2019, 06:00 PM.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by birdie View Post
                  I remember Wine in 2005 which could barely run any Windows applications.
                  Considering the fact that the 1.0 version only came to existence in 2008, after 15 freaking years of development.
                  11 years later we are running thousands of games over it, Wine really follows "Rome wasn't built in a day" strategy

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by birdie View Post
                    Thank you Valve and CodeWeavers for making desktop Linux what it's failed to be: a decent platform for software development and gaming. Too bad it requires a huge compatibility layer which is extremely difficult to maintain and develop since only Microsoft knows all its quirks and then on top of Win32 libraries quirks we have native Linux quirks (X11, kernel). It's astonishing we've gone so far.

                    I remember Wine in 2005 which could barely run any Windows applications. Nowadays, most run and thousands of titles run perfectly.
                    Not my games. The games I own don't play at all and I've tried all the tricks everywhere. The only real option is to just install Windows. I can't believe people put up with all the hoops required to play games on Linux. TOTAL CRAP.







                    just kidding

                    Linux plays enough of my games that I don't even have Windows installed anymore.

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