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Google Stadia's E3 Event Reveals New Details For This Linux+Vulkan Gaming Service

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  • #11
    Not interested in using Stadia. If I'm were to pay for cloud gaming, I'd want to be to play all the current games, which is what Windows-based Shadow offers. I'm hopeful that this might bring a few more big-budget native games to Steam on Linux, since the major porting work would already be done.

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    • #12
      stormcrow Well I believe UPenn has the resources to provide such a luxury to its students--at least I hope so! I know students are able to stream using Netflix, Hulu, Prime, etc. so I doubt they would block Stadia. It is something I'll test out when it becomes available.

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      • #13
        Originally posted by Blahblah View Post
        With how powerful sub-$300 systems are getting, the justifications for game-streaming services like Stadia get looser everyday. The pessimist in me says that this is a thinly-veiled attempt at getting people to buy games without allowing them to exert normal property rights over their copies.
        From my viewpoint, it is purely driven by how technology advances/evolves. ---- In the past, people got accustomed to buying CDs/DVDs/Blurays containing games because it was the only global communication medium in existence in those past days providing sufficient bandwidth to copy game data to the computer's harddrive. Internet had insufficient bandwidth. ---- Then, as the next step in the evolution of distributing games, the internet started to provide enough bandwidth to compete with CDs/DVDs/Blurays. This enabled widespread use of online game stores (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digita...in_video_games). ---- Today, the global internet bandwidth is starting to be fast enough to compete with the bandwidth from the video card to the display/monitor. It is completely natural for cloud gaming services to emerge at this point in time and these services definitely could not have emerged sooner.

        A thought experiment: If the evolutionary path was reversed, that is if it was natural in some universe for the bandwidth to decrease over time, the alternative universe would start by distributing games via cloud gaming services, then would go on to distributing games digitally via online stores, and then start distributing games on CDs. In this alternative universe, "normal property rights" would mean the distribution via cloud gaming services and people would be worried about being forced to transition to using CDs because they would believe that cloud gaming is the natural state.

        The natural state isn't where it all started - it is where it all converges to.

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        • #14
          Regulators should be up in Google's business if they use the word 'buy' to describe a transaction in which the user never actually possesses the thing they supposedly 'bought'. Even Microsoft's shitty 'Software as a Service' Office 365 actually resides on the customer's computer and can be used locally. Other than that, I don't see anything illegal about it. Stupid in many cases, evil, and of ill-intent, but not illegal.

          If Google wanted to un-screw this, they would need to provide access to a standalone PC download/client for every game actually purchased (not rented). We know those builds exist. Not every Stadia user will have the hardware to run the games locally, of course, but that wouldn't be Google's fault.

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          • #15
            Originally posted by sarmad View Post
            Well, if I can "buy" the game, then I should theoretically be able to download the game and run it on my own Linux machine.
            Nope. Only stream service providers can legally buy games. Consumers like you can only rent access to them.

            Or at least this will be the case in the year 2030. Enjoy

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            • #16
              Originally posted by kon14 View Post
              First things first, it's convenient and that's by bar the most important factor for the majority of the player base that may not care enough about ownership rights or modding and whatnot.
              Why do you think that it will not be possible for modders to upload their creations to a cloud gaming platform?

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              • #17
                Originally posted by atomsymbol View Post
                Why do you think that it will not be possible for modders to upload their creations to a cloud gaming platform?
                Because most of mod-heavy games depend on ability to patch original executable one way or another. Another reason is that games that not require such patching and have poweful API for mods will always be danger for security of said cloud gaming platform.

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                • #18
                  Originally posted by SXX⁣ View Post
                  Because most of mod-heavy games depend on ability to patch original executable one way or another. Another reason is that games that not require such patching and have poweful API for mods will always be danger for security of said cloud gaming platform.
                  Isn't security a concern only if the modders are anonymous?

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                  • #19
                    this will so suck for most people, even our office 500/50 mbit cable internet has hiccups and is not super amazing for youtube up-streaming, ...

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                    • #20
                      Originally posted by kpedersen View Post

                      Nope. Only stream service providers can legally buy games. Consumers like you can only rent access to them.

                      Or at least this will be the case in the year 2030. Enjoy
                      This is what I fear the most with game streaming, one day we might end up with not owning any games, only renting the service to play them. Gamers need to support developers who don't offer streaming only games and services like GOG where you truly own what you buy. I am not against game streaming, but we should be very careful it does not dominate the market, it offers whole lot of advantages for people who can't afford powerful gaming computers to run games at 1080p or 4K at Ultra settings and 60 fps, especially for laptop owners where gaming laptops can be very very expensive, but gamers need to be careful because if some developers go cloud only, those should be immediately boycotted.

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