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Steam's Linux Marketshare Ticks Up Ever So Slightly For May

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  • #21
    Originally posted by ColdDistance View Post
    Steam client shows my RX 580 as a RX 580, so I don't understand what is happening.
    Steam just uses OpenGL Renderer string reported by your video driver. And it depends on your driver version. Older Mesa versions reported chip code names instead of product names. For example, both RX480 and RX470 were reported as 'POLARIS10'

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    • #22
      Originally posted by khnazile View Post

      Steam just uses OpenGL Renderer string reported by your video driver. And it depends on your driver version. Older Mesa versions reported chip code names instead of product names. For example, both RX480 and RX470 were reported as 'POLARIS10'
      I suspect Steam actually uses PCI vendor:device IDs, since IIRC it reported my things by brand name before mesa did the name change.

      On the other hand, looks like RX 470/480/570/570X/580/580X/590 have the same PCI vendor:device IDs. You might be able to tease them apart based on revision and CU count, but since the drivers don't really care I doubt anyone has done the work to split out all of them.

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      • #23
        Are legacy games converted in 64bit for linux users? thanks.

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        • #24
          Originally posted by DoMiNeLa10 View Post

          SteamPlay hasn't made these games suddenly work. They did for a long time, if you were to put in the effort to set up a wine prefix for them. It only made it slightly easier (you still need to click around to enable a beta channel and enable SteamPlay for unapproved games).
          The "beta channel" thing is no longer needed since at least 6 months back so it's just the "enable SteamPlay for unapproved games" that is left. But more than that Valve have funded DXVK and Xaudio2 where both projects would not have been in the state that they are today without that support from Valve.

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          • #25
            Originally posted by Azrael5 View Post
            Are legacy games converted in 64bit for linux users? thanks.
            You cannot convert 32-bit games to 64-bit on any platform without recompiling the game from source. To run old 32-bit games you need to have the 32-bit versions of the needed libraries installed (and Steam contains a copy of the 32-bit Steam runtime for that reason).

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            • #26
              Originally posted by F.Ultra View Post

              The "beta channel" thing is no longer needed since at least 6 months back so it's just the "enable SteamPlay for unapproved games" that is left. But more than that Valve have funded DXVK and Xaudio2 where both projects would not have been in the state that they are today without that support from Valve.
              Yes, the point is that even with SteamPlay, it's a little bit more involved than clicking install and playing the game, so the user friendliness isn't there. I guess the only safe assumption to make is that average users are brain dead, and anything more involved than that is too much, not to mention that there's generally a performance penalty to running wine. Oh, and there are plenty of games that require some more work to get running in SteamPlay.

              I appreciate what Valve is doing, and it's one of the reasons why I buy from them, but that doesn't change the fact that the general population won't be switching. The mere fact that you have to go out of your way to install another operating system might be too much in itself.

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              • #27
                Originally posted by Azrael5 View Post
                Are legacy games converted in 64bit for linux users? thanks.
                No, games are finished products and are rarely updated, especially if a lot of time has passed since the launch. It looks a bit better in multiplayer titles, but a lot depends here on the popularity of the game.

                Anyway, as an user, you dont't have to worry about 32-bit libraries (maybe except glibc and drivers, especially OpenGL). Steam provides a runtime called Steam Runtime, and all games on this platform have to use it.
                https://pastebin.com/raw/F7RVqBbx
                Last edited by the_scx; 06-02-2019, 10:00 AM.

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                • #28
                  Originally posted by DoMiNeLa10 View Post

                  Yes, the point is that even with SteamPlay, it's a little bit more involved than clicking install and playing the game, so the user friendliness isn't there. I guess the only safe assumption to make is that average users are brain dead, and anything more involved than that is too much, not to mention that there's generally a performance penalty to running wine. Oh, and there are plenty of games that require some more work to get running in SteamPlay.

                  I appreciate what Valve is doing, and it's one of the reasons why I buy from them, but that doesn't change the fact that the general population won't be switching. The mere fact that you have to go out of your way to install another operating system might be too much in itself.
                  I guess you haven't played on windows in a while. Many games released before 10 that didn't receive patches since, require you to search forums for manual fixes that involve replacing DLLs in the game's folder and sometimes even installing some third party system software developed by some unknown kid on the internet. The situation is simply ridiculous to try to play older games on windows, so I guess soon or possibly already, Linux runs more games than windows 10 and in an easier and well supported way. Many PC gamers are used to modding their games, I guess it's acceptable to ask them to toggle a switch.

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                  • #29
                    Originally posted by jntesteves View Post

                    I guess you haven't played on windows in a while. Many games released before 10 that didn't receive patches since, require you to search forums for manual fixes that involve replacing DLLs in the game's folder and sometimes even installing some third party system software developed by some unknown kid on the internet. The situation is simply ridiculous to try to play older games on windows, so I guess soon or possibly already, Linux runs more games than windows 10 and in an easier and well supported way. Many PC gamers are used to modding their games, I guess it's acceptable to ask them to toggle a switch.
                    Yes, and old habits die hard. There's some learning involved to be able to use GNU/Linux properly, and that takes effort.

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                    • #30
                      Who even cares about market share. Only thing modt of us care about is that linux desktop is improving, which it is.

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