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A Half-Year Since Valve Released Steam Play For Linux, Its Marketshare Is Still Sub-1%

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  • #51
    Originally posted by Mike Frett View Post
    Linux isn't the problem now, humans are. People would rather spend hours trying to get Windows to function correctly instead of taking 10 minutes to try Linux. Pathetic, I'm sorry.
    That's true. Windows 10 is a bag filled of issues and people prefer to keep it instead of switching to a more reliable system like Ubuntu.

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    • #52
      Unapproved post for Dukenukemx above

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      • #53
        With Proton 95% of the games in my Steam library has are working flawless now.
        I was gaming on Linux before hand... but with Proton I have been spending much more of time, (and money) with Steam.

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        • #54
          my current count of Linux games and proton games working in Steam is 704. I have literally 3 games left in windows. One of them is Watch Dogs. Fallout 4 works fine as long as you dont go crazy on the mods. However, i am experimenting in maintaining the mods in vmware/virtualbox and loading it up in proton. The rest of my games are in crossover 32 bit or 64bit or a handful in wine. Blizzard games are working just fine with a few tweaks.

          As for Stadia.... shut up about it unless you tried it. I tried it and found it worked great even on a chromebook over wireless at less than 25Mb/s. I experienced very little lag if any. I am too interested in the cost, but for now I will wait. I played Odyssey on a chromebook while waiting on my replacement pump for my pc.

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          • #55
            Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
            This is so far from the truth that it's not even funny.
            Big titles always favoured consoles, because there is where most of the chimps with money play.
            But there is much more than just the few big buck productions, and there is no dwindling of anything.
            lol dream on.big titles started off on pc. Lala land arguments.

            Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
            Do we even need EA or Ubisoft games at all? Last I checked it was overhyped trash.
            if you want to be the basement dweller of games then no. I guess if you think tetris is the pinnacle of gaming, LOL...

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            • #56
              Linux marketshare is still low probably not because Linux gaming isn't growing, but because for every new Linux user there's 50 Windows ones, let's face it most pre built systems and almost every laptop comes with Windows. The lack of popular Multiplayer games unfortunately doesn't help and choosing between your favorite game over a different OS can be a very hard choice, I was in that position myself 5 years ago when I made the full switch.

              I often see the line "Linux is harder than Windows", in part yes due to its' nature but that's not even half of the story, stepping out of your comfort zone from a lifetime of Windows and into a new unfamiliar territory is not easy.

              Whenever I tried Linux I barely knew how to install it even though the GUI setup was pretty straightforward, the unix filesystem spoke another language and there was no "C:". Fast forward 5 years since those days and now I play around with the OS, I compile from source, write my own scripts and I can play more games than I ever imagined thanks to all the efforts. I can safely say Linux is my new comfort zone. Making me use Windows feels like torture, I feel naked and powerless without all the Linux tools I'm now used to, hell I don't even know how to compile "HelloWorld" in Windows.

              I believe the story of why macOS has a higher share is no different than Windows, it comes with every PC Apple sells.

              Random thought - I wonder what would happen if Apple were to switch their OS to Linux while retaining the same look and feel of macOS (which is somewhat already possible in Linux).

              Keep in mind that Linux only in the last year got the ability to play Windows games at almost native speeds thanks to Wine and DXVK, we didn't have Vulkan or many AAA titles before that. It will become popular, but needs time and support.
              Last edited by jojo7887; 02 April 2019, 06:31 PM.

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              • #57
                Originally posted by Bsdisbetter View Post
                big titles started off on pc.
                They were not big titles back then. They were just good games, just like many others offered by other smaller companies that still exist on PC.

                But still, what about Halo (Xbox), or AssCreed (multiplatform)? They didn't even started on PC.

                if you want to be the basement dweller of games then no. I guess if you think tetris is the pinnacle of gaming, LOL...
                If you think you need to play trash games just because they are made by big companies, you are the basement dweller, not me.

                For example, is Divinity Original Sin (and the 2) coming from a big company? No. Is it damn good strategy RTS with modern graphics? Yes.

                Are games like Outward https://store.steampowered.com/app/794260/Outward/ made by big companies? no. Is it a good open-ended RPG with pretty decent combat system with modern graphics? Yes.

                What about Stellaris, from Paradox? A great strategy game.

                Were Homeworld (the original) and Homeworld Cataclysm (now available renamed on GOG as Homeworld: Emergence because of copyright issues with Blizzard) made by big studios? No they were not, but they still became great titles.

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                • #58
                  Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
                  people is streaming REALTIME 1080p games FROM THEIR OWN PC, with no appreciable loss of quality
                  In general I agree with you. However, Twitch [email protected], game=Sekiro:
                  • In still scenery I believe I can see the I-frames
                  • Take screenshots to see the individual image quality when the player quickly rotates the game world
                  • Larger dark areas seem to contain artifacts

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                  • #59
                    Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
                    Correct, you need a distributed infrastructure. Google and other tech giants do have that as they need it also for their current services. They just need to add the "cloud consoles" in their datacenters spread around the world.
                    Like I said before, "techno babble". Have you tried playing a game on server hardware? A 56 core Intel Xeon running at 2.6Ghz is not a gaming CPU. Even still you could probably achieve 60fps since Stadia is limited to that frame rate anyway, but GPU's are a different story and I doubt Google has these server grade GPU's all over the place. They will be at specific key points, not right next door. Also games do make extensive use of a GPU where a CPU is something you can make use of for other tasks while gaming. So again the GPU's they use for Stadia are probably going to be used specific for gaming.
                    No we are at a tipping point. There is a significant amount of people that have decent Internet, even in third world countries like the US, and it could be enough to set the ball rolling

                    From a purely technical standpoint, it did manage to stay in the same ballpark of a console (and only twice the latency of a PC) with a 15Mbit connection which is achievable in many places. https://www.eurogamer.net/articles/d...tream-gdc-2019
                    and
                    https://www.eurogamer.net/articles/d...yssey-analysis
                    Even if the connection was fine, you still have data caps and dealing with wifi routers. Anyone who can run an Ethernet wire to their PC or to a Stadia thin client isn't going to use Stadia. Casual gamers though use crappy wifi routers supplied to them by their ISP that couldn't handle two Netflix streams at the same time, let alone Stadia plus Netflix. An 802.11ac wifi might, but certainly not Stadia at 4k and Netflix at 4k at the same time.

                    not really.

                    I'm not sure what this is even supposed to convey. Are "radeon server GPUs" somehow worse than NVIDIA gaming cards? Really?

                    But still, it's not even a "radeon server GPU" but a custom thing with 16GB of HBM2 ram https://www.eurogamer.net/articles/d...c-and-analysis
                    and it's supposed to be "elastic" aka you can join more than one of these things to run a single game.
                    If you don't know then you aren't in any position to convey what is or isn't the future. RTX means Ray-Tracing and at the moment no Radeon GPU has this feature. I swear you Google employee's need to learn some basic gaming etiquette.
                    It's better than a low end PC but of course not better than a high midrange or even high end gaming PC. But it's not terribly relevant.

                    Stadia isn't competing with PC but with consoles, that's its manifest target audience.
                    In order to Stream something like a game you need to compress the image and Google's compression technology isn't lossless. You're going to see a blurry image, you're going to see artifacts from the compression. Even a Intel GPU would still be better because everything stays sharp and clean. There is no free lunch when it comes to video streaming.
                    Please explain the rationale for using crappy compression algorithms when people is streaming REALTIME 1080p games FROM THEIR OWN PC, with no appreciable loss of quality. And Google is somehow unable to do at least the same.

                    Also, none of the demos showed this.
                    Even a good compression algorithm is not going to have the same image quality as one generated by your PC. That is a fact of compression. As ReviewTechUSA has explained people have expressed issues with image quality. Their 1080p requires 25 Mbps while 4k requires 30 Mbps. Really, an extra 5 Mbps for 4k? If you believe that then...
                    Doesn't matter, the benefits for the ecosystem owner are too big to pass up so they will keep trying until they make it.
                    The "cloud console" has always been a wet dream of both console vendors, btw. You know, being able to kill the used game market in one simple move and have full control on distribution so they can create regional exclusives similarly to other media (movies mostly).
                    I'm aware of that, and it'll fail miserably. If you haven't heard the AAA gaming industry isn't doing so hot lately and their games are failing left and right. This move would just push people to Indie game developers who actually don't have a problem porting their games to Linux. Microsoft tried that with Xbox One before it was even launched and to this day they are hurting from that decision. Remember this fiasco?



                    Now, I don't want to be captain obvious, but if you take a successful product and replace it with an empty shell with above-average graphics, and it fails hard.... it's completely expected.
                    Game studios rarely expect failures from their AAA games. Just like Google doesn't expect Stadia's exclusives to suck either. Don't you all have phones and tablets... and Smart TV's?

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                    • #60
                      Originally posted by muncrief View Post
                      Well, unfortunately you really can't run very many games with Proton. I'm glad Valve is working on it, but they need to work on in a lot more. I still have to use a custom wine installation to play my Windows games. Even the ones that do work with Proton, like No Man's Sky, don't run very well.
                      I was happy to find Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice worked just fine with Proton, since they do not plan for a Linux native, on the initial release date. World is a changing.

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