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A Half-Year Since Valve Released Steam Play For Linux, Its Marketshare Is Still Sub-1%

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  • A Half-Year Since Valve Released Steam Play For Linux, Its Marketshare Is Still Sub-1%

    Phoronix: A Half-Year Since Valve Released Steam Play For Linux, Its Marketshare Is Still Sub-1%

    With the start of a new month, Valve has just published their updated monthly Steam figures showing the Linux gaming market-share and more...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...h-2019-Figures

  • #2
    A Half-Year since Valve released Steam Play for Linux, there is still no hardware manufacturer selling decent Linux gaming laptops.

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    • #3
      Well, unfortunately you really can't run very many games with Proton. I'm glad Valve is working on it, but they need to work on in a lot more. I still have to use a custom wine installation to play my Windows games. Even the ones that do work with Proton, like No Man's Sky, don't run very well.

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      • #4
        It needs to run pubg lol fortnite and apex. Until we don’t have them on Linux we can forget the largest potential audiences for games that can grow the player base

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        • #5
          Originally posted by phoronix View Post
          Phoronix: A Half-Year Since Valve Released Steam Play For Linux, Its Marketshare Is Still Sub-1%

          With the start of a new month, Valve has just published their updated monthly Steam figures showing the Linux gaming market-share and more...

          http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...h-2019-Figures
          Some notes:

          Point 1: Exists there an explicit statement by Valve that Proton gaming counts as Linux market share and doesn't count as Windows market share?

          Point 2: There is a significant latency (months) for AAA Windows titles to get supported by Proton/Wine, which misses the initial hype surrounding a new AAA game. Even after that time passes, for example, The Witcher 3 released in year 2015 for Windows had performance issues and graphical issues in Linux in year 2018. (I mean this as a motivation for Linux-gaming-ecosystem developers: there are a lot of opportunities to make Linux better).

          Point 3: The new Epic Games Store has no Linux support and there are no plans to support Linux in the future. See https://trello.com/b/GXLc34hk/epic-games-store-roadmap

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          • #6
            Originally posted by sireangelus View Post
            It needs to run pubg lol fortnite and apex. Until we don’t have them on Linux we can forget the largest potential audiences for games that can grow the player base
            It seems to me, I don't know why, it may be a prejudice, that most Fortnite players wouldn't like to have Linux as their primary operating system.

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            • #7
              I think it's an oxymoron to try and make Linux gaming friendly when yet so many distros, even Ubuntu, aren't as simple to use as Windows yet. You still need to maintain the system even at a minimum level to prevent it from self-destructing due to outdated packages/drivers/libs. Valve should focus their efforts on a distro that doesn't have to worry about dependency-based package managers (maybe use Snapcraft exclusively?) that might get out of date and brick the system. I'm talking like grandma-levels of ease of use here, so much so that the system auto-updates by default and you have to seriously go out of your way and know what you're doing to disable it, like Windows. And even if you don't update and decide to finally do so after like 5 years, it just works.
              They complain about Windows so much yet they aren't offering a viable alternative. SteamOS is not a Windows replacement. If they want to replace Windows then they should actually attempt that, they have the tools available to them, there's more Linux tools out there they can already use then those that they'd have to write from scratch in order to do it. Really, the biggest hurdle would be getting away from the classical Linux ecosystem philosophy of offloading the work of a dedicated SxS implementation by juggling packages in a time-sensitive manner to avoid DLL/SO hell, which doesn't work at all (Any Arch user who forgot to update will tell you that). They really need to make an OS that's 100% idiot proof, I think Linux users just forget what that means when maintaining a system is almost instinct, you begin to forget how to empathize with grandma. There's so much work a perfect Windows replacement Linux distro needs to do and none of it even involves emulating the Windows API.

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              • #8
                The thing is: if Windows already works fine for everything I need, why would I switch to Linux?

                Most people - even some computer savvy ones - don't care about "the freedom of open source", privacy or the cost of a Windows license (look, it already comes pre-installed on my computer for "free" and it's what i'm accustomed to use, yay!).

                Unfortunately Linux will never be popular on the desktop.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by muncrief View Post
                  Well, unfortunately you really can't run very many games with Proton.
                  You can run "most" games on proton. 60% of the 7000+ games tested as per protondb.com, and the stats look better if you look at the top 1000 games.

                  The only ones I'm having problems with are multiplayer games with 3rd party anti-cheat software. (and even they will usually run in proton, you just can't join protected servers)

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Templar82 View Post
                    You can run "most" games on proton. 60% of the 7000+ games tested as per protondb.com, and the stats look better if you look at the top 1000 games.

                    The only ones I'm having problems with are multiplayer games with 3rd party anti-cheat software. (and even they will usually run in proton, you just can't join protected servers)
                    It's impressive how well they've gotten many Windows games to run in Linux. But Linux gaming in general is still a bit too flaky for most people. Even if a game is totally playable in Linux, it's still likely to have minor glitches and performance issues compared to running it in Windows.

                    There is one thing looming though, and that's Google's cloud gaming service. I played a bit of their Assassin's Creed test on a Linux laptop with an Intel graphics chip, and it worked just fine. With that method, there will be practically no difference in playing a game on a Windows or Linux computer. Though with that said, I'm not really cheering idea of cloud gaming.
                    Last edited by Chugworth; 04-01-2019, 11:41 PM.

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