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Godot 3.1 Open-Source Game Engine Debuts With Many Improvements

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  • #11
    Originally posted by Buntolo View Post
    This is super cool, I can't wait for 4.0. Any word on an official roadmap? There's nothing here: https://godotengine.org/roadmap
    AFAIK, what's at the end of the release notes is it.

    Originally posted by rdeleonp View Post

    They could integrate The Forge (TressFX guys) for their rendering needs.
    That's pretty interesting and it looks like they're trying to do the same things in regards to graphics portability. I can see the amdgpu-pro requirement being a blocker.

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    • #12
      Originally posted by rdeleonp View Post
      They could integrate The Forge (TressFX guys) for their rendering needs.
      Originally posted by skeevy420 View Post
      That's pretty interesting and it looks like they're trying to do the same things in regards to graphics portability. I can see the amdgpu-pro requirement being a blocker.
      MESA + RADV seems to work.

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      • #13
        Originally posted by rdeleonp View Post
        That's good to know. I was just going off of their write-up.

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        • #14
          Originally posted by Mateus Felipe View Post
          Godot is on-par with Unity, although not stable as it. In my opinion, it's better than Unity on 2D, but need to improve on 3D. I'm glad I contributed a little with this amazing release.
          Disclaimer, I'm a Unity dev, so I might be completely biased.

          Godot is great, and there are lots of reasons to prefer it over Unity, first of all it being open source, but I'm sure it's definitely not on par with Unity at any level.

          First reason is that it's quite easy to figure out that over 1000 dedicated programmers, selected by their skills, working all year long, every day on Unity has more horsepower than what Godot can propose today. The mere fact that Vulkan is still not available in Godot is a proof of that.

          Second reason is that if the feature is here, it does not mean it scales very well. What are the performance? How many characters can you animate at once? How many polygons can you have in your scene? Does streaming work so you can have very large landscapes? Is it easy to add ads so your game could be sustainable? Is it easy to propose DLCs? How many platforms are supported? etc. etc.

          Edit: To be clear, I'm glad Godot exists and is improving, and I'll certainly follow its progression, but if you want to give advice to someone who doesn't know which engine to choose, use real facts and not beliefs. Godot editor is officially supported on Linux, for instance.

          This comment on GamingOnLinux is pretty well done: https://www.gamingonlinux.com/articl...ment_id=150315
          Last edited by Creak; 03-15-2019, 09:41 AM.

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          • #15
            And the funny thing is, Unity is the worst "AAA" game engine. Unity is so slow and garbage that I believe GoDot actually has a chance to at least match it in features+speed the next couple years.

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            • #16
              Originally posted by Creak View Post

              Disclaimer, I'm a Unity dev, so I might be completely biased.

              Godot is great, and there are lots of reasons to prefer it over Unity, first of all it being open source, but I'm sure it's definitely not on par with Unity at any level.

              First reason is that it's quite easy to figure out that over 1000 dedicated programmers, selected by their skills, working all year long, every day on Unity has more horsepower than what Godot can propose today. The mere fact that Vulkan is still not available in Godot is a proof of that.

              Second reason is that if the feature is here, it does not mean it scales very well. What are the performance? How many characters can you animate at once? How many polygons can you have in your scene? Does streaming work so you can have very large landscapes? Is it easy to add ads so your game could be sustainable? Is it easy to propose DLCs? How many platforms are supported? etc. etc.

              Edit: To be clear, I'm glad Godot exists and is improving, and I'll certainly follow its progression, but if you want to give advice to someone who doesn't know which engine to choose, use real facts and not beliefs. Godot editor is officially supported on Linux, for instance.

              This comment on GamingOnLinux is pretty well done: https://www.gamingonlinux.com/articl...ment_id=150315
              That thread in general was an interesting read.

              Like that one post points out, it does have its flaws -- like how documentation on using other languages with GDNative is lacking (I'm looking at you, godot-rust) and how the console support isn't the best; but, overall, they're a small team and they make a good program with their limited resources. To me it seems like they're trying to get 2d nice and polished before fully tackling 3d while simultaneously trying to deal with the ever evolving graphics implementations...you think you find a good standard and come to find out it's craptasticly implemented...

              They way I look at it is like this: Godot might not have the manpower and commercial support behind it like Unity or Unreal, but they have been really consistent with releases, it usually gets better with each release, and they've made a gem in regards to 2d game making. The future is looking really nice for Godot. I wish them the best of luck.

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              • #17
                Originally posted by abott View Post
                And the funny thing is, Unity is the worst "AAA" game engine. Unity is so slow and garbage that I believe GoDot actually has a chance to at least match it in features+speed the next couple years.
                Please explain why you think so, and try to provide sources in order to make a real point.

                Also, did you know Unity is redoing entirely it's engine using their new tech called DOTS (Data Oriented Tech Stack). I'm actually working on it, and it is blazing fast, even if it's entirely written in C# (and that comes from an engine programmer that worked in C++ for more than 10 years).

                Source: https://unity.com/dots
                Last edited by Creak; 03-15-2019, 04:00 PM.

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                • #18
                  Originally posted by Creak View Post

                  Please explain why you think so, and try to provide sources in order to make a real point.

                  Also, did you know Unity is redoing entirely it's engine using their new tech called DOTS (Data Oriented Tech Stack). I'm actually working on it, and it is blazing fast, even if it's entirely written in C# (and that comes from an engine programmer that worked in C++ for more than 10 years).

                  Source: https://unity.com/dots
                  To wager some guesses -- all the crappy shovelware games made with Unity using premade asset packs; it being the go-to engine for beginners leading to less-than-optimized games; high-profile games like KSP that just don't perform very well. None of those are really the fault of Unity, but people blame Unity for them none-the-less. It's like blaming Python for crappy scripts and not the script writer since Python, like Unity, is considered easy to pick up and use.

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                  • #19
                    Originally posted by skeevy420 View Post

                    To wager some guesses -- all the crappy shovelware games made with Unity using premade asset packs; it being the go-to engine for beginners leading to less-than-optimized games; high-profile games like KSP that just don't perform very well. None of those are really the fault of Unity, but people blame Unity for them none-the-less. It's like blaming Python for crappy scripts and not the script writer since Python, like Unity, is considered easy to pick up and use.
                    That I agree. Unity definitely has an image issue for a simple reason: serious game devs (that do AA or AAA games with Unity) buy a license so they can remove the Unity logo, but beginners and starting indie studios keep the free version, where you don't have the choice to remove the Unity logo. So you end up seeing the Unity logo on games that aren't that good, but don't see on AA or AAA games that were also made with Unity.

                    And that's why Unity often make these quick videos showing the awesome games that's been made with Unity recently:

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