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Unreal Engine 4.22 Preview 1 Released With Real-Time Ray-Tracing

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  • Unreal Engine 4.22 Preview 1 Released With Real-Time Ray-Tracing

    Phoronix: Unreal Engine 4.22 Preview 1 Released With Real-Time Ray-Tracing

    Unreal Engine 4.21 back in November was a big update for Linux gamers in that this game engine now defaults to the Vulkan renderer and also had various other fixes. With today's Unreal Engine 4.22 Preview 1 release, there are no Linux/Vulkan-specific changes mentioned, but some other interesting changes in general...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...4.22-Preview-1

  • #2
    I think they could probably use profiling to figure out when and where to enable raytracing, and on what surfaces, by playing the game with rasterization, then re-running the recorded demo with raytracing on everything, and measuring the squared error on a surface-by-surface basis and then combining that with a model of the cost of adding raytracing to that surface.

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    • #3
      You mean Noise Tracing.

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      • #4
        Unreal is supposed to be cross platform engine, but Epic doesn't even support Linux on their in house games using the engine. Doesn't inspire much confidence..

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        • #5
          Originally posted by humbug View Post
          Unreal is supposed to be cross platform engine, but Epic doesn't even support Linux on their in house games using the engine. Doesn't inspire much confidence..
          Exactly my thoughts.
          Borderlands 2 was a great game though. Presequal is not bad either. I really hope BL3 will be released on Linux.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by humbug View Post
            Unreal is supposed to be cross platform engine, but Epic doesn't even support Linux on their in house games using the engine. Doesn't inspire much confidence..
            The fact that its a tremendous PITA to get UE4 to "work" on Linux isn't helping. Quotation marks, because I'm not even talking about having a working project, but really just about getting the engine to start, allowing it to compile projects from C++ source, and not having it crash every time you open the Project Settings dialogue...
            (This statement is based on my by the way successful attempt to get a GameJam project built for Linux, using UE 4.18. Maybe the situation improved meanwhile.)
            Last edited by soulsource; 02-13-2019, 03:25 AM.

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            • #7
              If I were so inclined to use a game engine, I'd put up with the problems with Godot (lack of documentation/tutorials etc.) to have something that was FOSS. The problems with Unity and UE far outweigh the problems with Godot in my eyes. It only makes sense to go with UE if you're doing AAA I think.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by soulsource View Post
                The fact that its a tremendous PITA to get UE4 to "work" on Linux isn't helping. Quotation marks, because I'm not even talking about having a working project, but really just about getting the engine to start, allowing it to compile projects from C++ source, and not having it crash every time you open the Project Settings dialogue...
                (This statement is based on my by the way successful attempt to get a GameJam project built for Linux, using UE 4.18. Maybe the situation improved meanwhile.)
                If the Linux userland wasn't such a fucking hot mess of API breaking garbage then perhaps it would "work" much better and devs would have an easier time porting their stuff.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Weasel View Post
                  If the Linux userland wasn't such a fucking hot mess of API breaking garbage then perhaps it would "work" much better and devs would have an easier time porting their stuff.
                  None of the problems I mentioned were in any way related to the Linux userland. The first issue I encountered was that the source code accessors for UE4 were all outdated, and incompatible with recent engine versions. After getting one of them (the QtCreator accessor) to compile with 4.18, the next issue was that the path to the compiler binary was hardcoded, instead of just querying or even trying to simply launch it from PATH.
                  Finally the bug with the Project Settings was another hardcoded path issue, namely the path to sh, which was just set to the value usually found on OS X...

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