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20-Way NVIDIA/AMD Vulkan Linux Gaming Performance Comparison

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  • #11
    Originally posted by ElectricPrism View Post
    I'm having difficulty wrapping my head around GTX 1080 Ti pushing 151.36 FPS on DOTA @ 1080p.

    And then pushing 147.83 FPS on DOTA @ 4k.

    That's 400% as many pixels, what dirty tricks or meaning does this have.
    A nice analogy would be a road. a Single lane would cope nicely with 50 cars / minute at 100kph, but trying to push 200 cars a minute @ 100kph does not work, a 6 lane freeway would have no problems.
    The 1080ti would be the 6 lane freeway so coping with 50 cars / minute is no problem.

    The limiting factor for this game is that it is CPU bound, it can only push so much game information a second. Turning that game information into pixels does not take lots more CPU time - the textures and objects are loaded into VRAM and then the scene is rendered.

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    • #12
      Originally posted by AlB80 View Post
      The kernel driver is the same - AMDGPU.
      OpenGL: Catalyst (fglrx) is slower than radeonsi.
      Vulkan: AMDVLK is faster than RADV. And AMDVLK is contributed to open source.
      I was talking about Vulkan. Specifically the driver included in the Radeon software package. It includes proprietary shader compiler which is fast. Sometimes there is no difference but sometimes there is a significant gap.
      https://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pa...oft-1810&num=3

      I am guessing that shader compiler is one of the reasons that in Windows AMD always beats Nvidia at Vulkan. Hopefully amdvlk can come up to that level in the next few months.
      Last edited by humbug; 07-27-2018, 03:12 AM.

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      • #13
        Originally posted by humbug View Post
        I am guessing that shader compiler is one of the reasons that in Windows AMD always beats Nvidia at Vulkan. Hopefully amdvlk can come up to that level in the next few months.
        I don't know if it will be "the next few months" but our goal is to get the LLVM-based compiler speed up to the point where it can replace the current proprietary compiler in all applications.

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        • #14
          Originally posted by bridgman View Post

          I don't know if it will be "the next few months" but our goal is to get the LLVM-based compiler speed up to the point where it can replace the current proprietary compiler in all applications.
          this really sounds good :-) [email protected] should write a news article for this alone.
          Phantom circuit Sequence Reducer Dyslexia

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          • #15
            Originally posted by bridgman View Post

            I don't know if it will be "the next few months" but our goal is to get the LLVM-based compiler speed up to the point where it can replace the current proprietary compiler in all applications.
            Excuse a noobish question, but who owns the licenses on AMD's drivers? I would have thought that AMD develops all of this in-house. If that's not the case, who does this? Is it private contractors (from India or Europe or whatever), is it maybe researchers from public sector (universities, institutes etc.) or maybe somebody else?

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            • #16
              Originally posted by Qaridarium View Post
              this really sounds good :-) [email protected] should write a news article for this alone.
              At least once we make more progress on it. I'm not a big fan of articles that just say "hey this random AMD guy said they're working on something

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              • #17
                Originally posted by IreMinMon View Post
                Excuse a noobish question, but who owns the licenses on AMD's drivers? I would have thought that AMD develops all of this in-house. If that's not the case, who does this? Is it private contractors (from India or Europe or whatever), is it maybe researchers from public sector (universities, institutes etc.) or maybe somebody else?
                I'll just tweak your question a bit to separate "license" from "copyright".

                The source code files are almost entirely X11-licensed (sometimes called "MIT license" but there are apparently over 50 different MIT licenses).

                Each contribution can have a different copyright holder (either the developer or the company that paid them to do the work, depending on local laws), so in practice the answer is "copyright is held by a bunch of individuals and companies". I imagine AMD is the largest contributor but a number of other companies and individuals are also actively contributing, and each holds copyright on their contributions.

                If developer A writes some code then they (or their employer) hold copyright on it. If developer B modifies that code (or uses portions of it for something else) then both developers (or their employers) hold copyright on the resulting code. Pretty soon you have hundreds of different entities holding copyright on something in the driver, and at that point it's basically the license and the maintainers that guide what happens from there.

                Pretty much all of the new HW support comes from AMD in-house developers, but new features (and fixes) come from a much broader range of people/companies including distro teams, game developers/porters and volunteers. I should also mention the radv Vulkan driver, which was developed by non-AMD folks (mostly Dave and Bas) leveraging radeonsi code used for Mesa GL.

                Our developers are scattered around the world (for a while it was pretty much "six developers, six countries") although the majority of the developers these days work in the Markham or Shanghai offices.
                Last edited by bridgman; 07-27-2018, 03:52 PM.

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                • #18
                  Originally posted by bridgman View Post

                  I'll just tweak your question a bit to separate "license" from "copyright".

                  The source code files are almost entirely X11-licensed (sometimes called "MIT license" but there are apparently over 50 different MIT licenses).

                  Each contribution can have a different copyright holder (either the developer or the company that paid them to do the work, depending on local laws), so in practice the answer is "copyright is held by a bunch of individuals and companies". I imagine AMD is the largest contributor but a number of other companies and individuals are also actively contributing, and each holds copyright on their contributions.

                  If developer A writes some code then they (or their employer) hold copyright on it. If developer B modifies that code (or uses portions of it for something else) then both developers (or their employers) hold copyright on the resulting code. Pretty soon you have hundreds of different entities holding copyright on something in the driver, and at that point it's basically the license and the maintainers that guide what happens from there.

                  Pretty much all of the new HW support comes from AMD in-house developers, but new features (and fixes) come from a much broader range of people/companies including distro teams, game developers/porters and volunteers. I should also mention the radv Vulkan driver, which was developed by non-AMD folks (mostly Dave and Bas) leveraging radeonsi code used for Mesa GL.

                  Our developers are scattered around the world (for a while it was pretty much "six developers, six countries") although the majority of the developers these days work in the Markham or Shanghai offices.
                  That's cool, what I meant though is who owns the "copyright" on proprietary compiler you were talking about, if not AMD?

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                  • #19
                    Originally posted by tildearrow View Post

                    The GTX 1070 is beating itself!
                    "Stop hitting yourself" I used to do that to my brothers when I was a kid, that's silly...

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                    • #20
                      Originally posted by IreMinMon View Post
                      That's cool, what I meant though is who owns the "copyright" on proprietary compiler you were talking about, if not AMD?
                      Ahh... all of the proprietary compiler code is AMD-authored (so we hold copyright), but because we use it across a number of OSes it builds on header files derived from files whose copyright is held by those OS vendors. Over the years it also accumulates content from various custom and semi-custom projects we have done for customers over the years, and our ability to use that content usually requires that it stay closed.

                      On the other hand the LLVM back end we originally developed for Mesa GL is already the go-to shader compiler for a lot of new AMD projects, including our compute stack and AMDVLK.
                      Last edited by bridgman; 07-28-2018, 12:10 PM.

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