Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

HID Updates For Linux 4.18 Add The Valve Steam Controller Kernel Driver

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • HID Updates For Linux 4.18 Add The Valve Steam Controller Kernel Driver

    Phoronix: HID Updates For Linux 4.18 Add The Valve Steam Controller Kernel Driver

    Just as we have been expecting of the Steam Controller kernel driver to land with Linux 4.18, it's happening and has just been submitted as part of the HID subsystem updates for this next kernel release...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...eam-Controller

  • #2
    It's interesting to see how the 2-year-old X1 S controller, which is more popular, gets a lot less attention than the Asset Flip Store Controller. If xpadneo wasn't a thing, we couldn't even talk about work in progress.

    Comment


    • #3
      Without per-game settings steam controller is not so useful. Afaik, it was possible to use it as a mouse earlier, you just have to have steam client running. Actual thing we need is steam controller virtualization for wine, to run windows steam games with correct controller profile.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by eydee View Post
        It's interesting to see how the 2-year-old X1 S controller, which is more popular, gets a lot less attention than the Asset Flip Store Controller. If xpadneo wasn't a thing, we couldn't even talk about work in progress.
        I know right? People should be more attracted to the "over 100 million" controller that have a faulty d-pad circuitry, is the most game incompatibility plagued controlled on Linux (and on Windows even with MS published game...), and have a expensive dongle with wireless protocol so complicated that developers had given up reverse engineering it.

        Why people are not attracted to that wonder...

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by eydee View Post
          the 2-year-old X1 S controller, which is more popular
          Surveys by gamingonlinux and boilingsteam both show the Steam Controller as being the most popular type of gamepad for Linux users.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by anth View Post

            Surveys by gamingonlinux and boilingsteam both show the Steam Controller as being the most popular type of gamepad for Linux users.
            I find that intriguing. While I don't use an XBox One S controller, I also think the Steam controller isn't the ideal solution for gaming.

            For analog input, I bought two "XBox 360 Controller for Windows" back before the XBox One came out and one is still sitting in its box in the closet for when this one breaks. For D-Pad stuff, I bought three broken OEM SNES controllers for $15 and repaired them into two working ones, which I hook up using a cheap USB adapter.

            (One SNES controller had a perfectly good PCB in a yellowed, destroyed shell with the cord ripped out. The other looked like-new but the PCB was dead. The third one was perfectly good and functioned except that some rage-gripping had flexed the shell enough to induce the support peg for Start and Select to press upward and crack the PCB, severing the traces for Start and Select in three places. A little scraping-off of the conformal coating and solder-bridging over the cracks resulted in a controller that is perfectly good in the hands of someone who won't once again try to dissipate their frustration into it.)

            I do have a Steam controller... I just only really use it as a way to remote-control my desktop without the bulk and weirdly-designed pointing stick of the Microsoft Media Center Keyboard that I also have kicking around.
            Last edited by ssokolow; 06-08-2018, 10:25 PM.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by anth View Post

              Surveys by gamingonlinux and boilingsteam both show the Steam Controller as being the most popular type of gamepad for Linux users.
              GamingOnLinux had 31% of their users running an Arch-based distro, so the numbers are definitely targeted towards enthusiasts which likely increases the use of Stream Controllers. Probably the same thing for boilingsteam.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by ssokolow View Post

                I find that intriguing. While I don't use an XBox One S controller, I also think the Steam controller isn't the ideal solution for gaming.

                For analog input, I bought two "XBox 360 Controller for Windows" back before the XBox One came out and one is still sitting in its box in the closet for when this one breaks. For D-Pad stuff, I bought three broken OEM SNES controllers for $15 and repaired them into two working ones, which I hook up using a cheap USB adapter.

                (One SNES controller had a perfectly good PCB in a yellowed, destroyed shell with the cord ripped out. The other looked like-new but the PCB was dead. The third one was perfectly good and functioned except that some rage-gripping had flexed the shell enough to induce the support peg for Start and Select to press upward and crack the PCB, severing the traces for Start and Select in three places. A little scraping-off of the conformal coating and solder-bridging over the cracks resulted in a controller that is perfectly good in the hands of someone who won't once again try to dissipate their frustration into it.)

                I do have a Steam controller... I just only really use it as a way to remote-control my desktop without the bulk and weirdly-designed pointing stick of the Microsoft Media Center Keyboard that I also have kicking around.

                The beauty of PC gaming is you can use whatever you want for gaming. I too have a Steam Controller and agree with you that it does not shine on certain types of games. Just for kicks I got to the 10th stage of NES Battletoads with the touchpad (and that includes the infamous 3th stage).

                You are not missing much not buying the Xbone Controller. It sure feel nicer on hand than the XB360, but you soon question where those 100 million where spent. They basically reduced the force on the sticks and triggers, and have thinner grips.

                It is noisier and at last in my hands the plastic around the inner part of the triggers where kinda sharp and distracting. The triggers vibration is a waste, because of the very few (I only know about Forza on Windows) games that use it. Also, the D-Pad is not a improvement, only different, and the contacts bellow on the PCB are flawed, since they tend to stop working over time. The disassembly is a nightmare, you cannot believe how complicated things are inside it, compared to the XB360.

                In the end it feels like a nice controller, but its game support on Linux is well bellow the XBox 360 controller and will not make you play better. Heck, my record on Assault Android Cactus was made with the 360, despite having almost all other famous controllers at my collection.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by [email protected] View Post
                  The beauty of PC gaming is you can use whatever you want for gaming. I too have a Steam Controller and agree with you that it does not shine on certain types of games. Just for kicks I got to the 10th stage of NES Battletoads with the touchpad (and that includes the infamous 3th stage).
                  *chuckle* For games with a control device in mind, I'm big on getting just the right feel. (I'd also like to have my N64 controller with replacement Gamecube-style stick in that "game at a moment's notice" spread, but ran out of room.) For example, I use the SNES controller with my copy of Castlevania: The Dracula X Chronicles and the Genesis controller for Freedom Planet.

                  One thing I've noticed via that loadout is that Nintendo actually tuned the NES Mario games and SNES Mario games differently to account for the different stiffnesses of the D-Pads on their respective controllers. If I try to play NES Mario games on the SNES controllers, Mario feels insufficiently responsive. (ie. The stiffer feel of the NES D-Pad "justifies" Mario's on-screen behaviour.)

                  Originally posted by [email protected] View Post
                  Also, the D-Pad is not a improvement, only different, and the contacts bellow on the PCB are flawed, since they tend to stop working over time. The disassembly is a nightmare, you cannot believe how complicated things are inside it, compared to the XB360.
                  The D-Pad is the only part of the 360 controller that I don't consider perfect as a default-choice controller, so thanks for telling me. (It's a shame that I can't use the best D-Pad I've ever tried on my desktop though.)

                  Speaking of repair, SNES/SFC controllers are the best. Every single part is keyed to prevent mis-assembly, the US, EU, and JP versions of the controllers all use the same moulds (aside from the convex vs. concave X and Y button tops), the cable can be detached from the PCB without desoldering, and, electrically, it's the same "just a shift register" design used in NES/Famicom pads.

                  (With a passive adapter, SNES/SFC controllers are actually electrically compatible with NES and Famicom Model 2 consoles to the point where the shift register's read-out sequence will map SNES B and Y to NES A and B, just like Super Mario World does compared to earlier Mario games.)

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by ssokolow View Post

                    *chuckle* For games with a control device in mind, I'm big on getting just the right feel. (I'd also like to have my N64 controller with replacement Gamecube-style stick in that "game at a moment's notice" spread, but ran out of room.) For example, I use the SNES controller with my copy of Castlevania: The Dracula X Chronicles and the Genesis controller for Freedom Planet.

                    One thing I've noticed via that loadout is that Nintendo actually tuned the NES Mario games and SNES Mario games differently to account for the different stiffnesses of the D-Pads on their respective controllers. If I try to play NES Mario games on the SNES controllers, Mario feels insufficiently responsive. (ie. The stiffer feel of the NES D-Pad "justifies" Mario's on-screen behaviour.)



                    The D-Pad is the only part of the 360 controller that I don't consider perfect as a default-choice controller, so thanks for telling me. (It's a shame that I can't use the best D-Pad I've ever tried on my desktop though.)

                    Speaking of repair, SNES/SFC controllers are the best. Every single part is keyed to prevent mis-assembly, the US, EU, and JP versions of the controllers all use the same moulds (aside from the convex vs. concave X and Y button tops), the cable can be detached from the PCB without desoldering, and, electrically, it's the same "just a shift register" design used in NES/Famicom pads.

                    (With a passive adapter, SNES/SFC controllers are actually electrically compatible with NES and Famicom Model 2 consoles to the point where the shift register's read-out sequence will map SNES B and Y to NES A and B, just like Super Mario World does compared to earlier Mario games.)


                    I have a small collection of Nintendo consoles. Recently I bough a SNES, to make company to my NES, N64, GB and SGB. Interesting the Mario games responsiveness thing, I never though of that.

                    A video of Retromancave on YouTube the guy had the audacity to call the NES controlller "terrible". He probably never had to play on some joypads I had when young. Another guy, Gaming Historian, said on one of his videos that the N64 d-pad "wan't great", and that also made me jump of my chair. To me is a great d-pad, its a shame it wasn't more used on N64 games. To me is a great controller overall, and the best on in my collection to play emulation games, because is the only one with a USB adapter.

                    Speaking of USB adapter, witch ones do you recommend for the NES, SNES and N64?

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X