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Ray-Tracing Is All The Rage At This Year's Game Developers Conference

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  • #21
    Originally posted by Leopard View Post
    Only capable devs like id Software team can do it properly for now
    do you know that all original id software devs are working for someone else for long time?

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    • #22
      Originally posted by blacknova View Post

      I'd rather prefer some additional programmable stage, fixed function might work for triangles, but would suck for other possible things, i.e. NURBS, parametric objects, CSG, etc.
      You can use the generic compute units for other possible things

      The point of having fixed function ray tracing units is performance.

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      • #23
        Originally posted by Naquatis View Post
        I only hear fancy stuff like yeah with Kernel 4.17 we have Vanilla Kernel support for ROCm.
        what is wrong with that? you could use amd kernel fork, it is open source

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        • #24
          Originally posted by OneTimeShot View Post
          It seems like every time the hardware people build something faster, software people come up with additional crazy!

          You’ve got a really fast GPU. Real time ray tracing!!!
          as article explained, software people came up with raytracing many years ago. they just were waiting for hardware people to catch up

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          • #25
            Clearly, not a group of commenters working with 3D Modeling/Rendering tools.

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            • #26
              Ray tracing requires random geometry and material and texture access. Since 1998, random access has only gotten slower compared to patterned access used by rasterization.

              What gamers need is actual curves in both graphics and geometry. Graphically, a curved surface can simply be a partially shaded polygon surface, just test whether the point being shaded projects onto the actual surface and don't shade, this requires less memory access and more computation which is good. Physically, it's very possible to compare polygon outlines and then do the polynomials.

              When will static geometry have curves?

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              • #27
                Originally posted by pal666 View Post
                what is wrong with that? you could use amd kernel fork, it is open source
                Before I would touch the kernel I would use other options to use ROCm but I can wait till 4.17 no problem.

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                • #28
                  Originally posted by msotirov View Post
                  I could live with grain to get such realistic reflections and lighting as in the Remedy demo. You could just squint and pretend it's "film grain"
                  Considering how good non-raytraced reflections have become I wouldn't consider it worth the side effects.

                  Maybe some point down the line when improvements in hardware allows for an increase in the number of rays to the point where most of the graininess goes away this makes sense, but with current hardware it just doesn't make all that much sense.

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                  • #29
                    Originally posted by eigenlambda View Post
                    Ray tracing requires random geometry and material and texture access. Since 1998, random access has only gotten slower compared to patterned access used by rasterization.
                    ...
                    It depends on the scene. Most of the time you can exploit ray coherence, at least for the primary rays. Neighbor rays will often hit the same object/area.

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                    • #30
                      Originally posted by InsideJob View Post
                      LOL, it was all the rage in 1998... give it another couple decades.
                      LOL indeed. I was about to say "it was all the rage in 1978 too" but I think 1979 was the first time ray tracing made it onto the presentation list for Siggraph.

                      By the time I started going to Siggraph (1981 in Dallas IIRC) ray traced movies were pretty common.

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