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Following RHEL, Oracle Linux 7 Brought To ARM

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  • Following RHEL, Oracle Linux 7 Brought To ARM

    Phoronix: Following RHEL, Oracle Linux 7 Brought To ARM

    Following Red Hat promoting Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 for ARM under general availability, Oracle with their RHEL7-derivative, Oracle Linux 7, also now supports ARM...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...le-Linux-7-ARM

  • #2
    Not that I'm complaining, but why? ARM is fantastic for stuff like web hosting and file sharing but not a whole lot else. I would argue Oracle's most relevant Linux ARM-compatible products are Java and MySQL, neither of which are ideal on a platform with limited processing power. There's also ZFS or btrfs, but for server usage I can't imagine they'd be all that useful, considering most ARM devices don't have the bandwidth for multiple drives, and again, limited processing power.

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    • #3
      If your a company and your a owner of something like Cavium ThunderX, then this will indeed be a good thing. A company like Red Hat throwing support behind the ARM platforms means you might get their services on that platform, this is a business move, though will it pay off? The advantage of running ARM over a x86 competitor is that you save cost on the energy bill, for a hobbyist running a few RPI3 servers this will be off little consequence. Though someone considering buing tens if not hundreds of ThunderX servers and already a Red Hat customer, this might mean cost savings in the long term.
      Desktop Environment poll:
      https://www.phoronix.com/forums/foru...de-do-you-like

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      • #4
        Originally posted by schmidtbag View Post
        Not that I'm complaining, but why?
        The article cites Cavium ThunderX, which is (up to) 48-core part with 135W of TDP, 512GB ram, a ton of PCIe lanes, 16 sata ports and 8x 10GBit ethernet ports (or better), so ok it's not a quad-CPU bigass computing xeon server, but it still is not a "platform with limited processing power" by a long shot.
        https://www.anandtech.com/show/10353...48-arm-cores/2

        The X-Gene 3 (another SoC mentioned) is trading blows with high end xeons. https://www.anandtech.com/show/11189...tarts-sampling

        Don't get yourself misguided by the mention of Raspi 3, ARM isn't just for low-power.

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        • #5
          For what it's worth, they don't really need much in the way of reasons to do this. They get it basically for free by being a RHEL derivative

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          • #6
            sure for oracle not to support it would have been work.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by microcode View Post
              For what it's worth, they don't really need much in the way of reasons to do this. They get it basically for free by being a RHEL derivative
              Not quite for free... as far as I know, they're not shipping the actual RHEL binaries, so to support additional architectures like ARM, they need to provide their own build infrastructure for those platforms. But yeah, certainly a lot of the work has been done for them...

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Delgarde View Post
                Not quite for free... as far as I know, they're not shipping the actual RHEL binaries, so to support additional architectures like ARM, they need to provide their own build infrastructure for those platforms. But yeah, certainly a lot of the work has been done for them...
                I mean, sure there's the minuscule incremental cost of adding one more cross toolchain to their build servers, and the even smaller cost of additional storage, but I think that's still "basically free".

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