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Mesa Is Up To About 8,000 Commits This Year, 2.2 Million Lines

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  • Mesa Is Up To About 8,000 Commits This Year, 2.2 Million Lines

    Phoronix: Mesa Is Up To About 8,000 Commits This Year, 2.2 Million Lines

    Now being into Q4, I've been meaning to run some fresh Mesa Git development statistics to see how this year is pacing for this important piece of the open-source graphics ecosystem and Linux desktop...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...art-Of-Q4-2017

  • #2
    What would be interesting is seeing where the commits are all going.. big spike around 2007.. that's about when AMD started their open source Radeon push wasn't it? Looking back at some Phoronix articles, how times have changed in 10 years.

    Excellent effort, and it's making sure I'm looking at a Vega card soon, and a Raven Ridge laptop next year (currently Radeon 380X on desktop, and i7-6700HQ + nVidia 970m laptop .. nope, definitely prefer Radeon under Linux).

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    • #3
      I'm really happy to see that there are so many contributions.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by lem79 View Post
        What would be interesting is seeing where the commits are all going.. big spike around 2007.. that's about when AMD started their open source Radeon push wasn't it? Looking back at some Phoronix articles, how times have changed in 10 years.
        Well, seeing as Marek alone might be reaching 1000 commits by the end of the year, I think it's safe to assume radeonsi/amdgpu are collectively the most active. Intel may be more feature-complete, but, their hardware is less complex and they spread out their development a lot more evenly over time. In other words, Intel has had a head start over AMD; AMD is still playing catch-up and as a result is more active in their development. I think Intel also focuses on things outside/instead of mesa that AMD doesn't spend as much time in, like open-source OpenCL (Beignet) and video encoding.

        Anyway, I figure Intel was actually the one who really did most of the contributions around 2007. That's around the time when the Core i series was starting to get popular, and had Intel's first "APU". AMD at the time made their promises toward open-source, but back then the open drivers were basically an unusable mess. To my understanding, the radeon drivers really started to evolve around 2009-2010. From what I recall, the radeon drivers weren't really a viable substitute to fglrx until right around 2011 or 2012 (so around the time when GCN was released).

        Interesting stuff to think about, though. Of course, I may be wrong about some of the things I said.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by schmidtbag View Post
          Well, seeing as Marek alone might be reaching 1000 commits by the end of the year, I think it's safe to assume radeonsi/amdgpu are collectively the most active. Intel may be more feature-complete, but, their hardware is less complex and they spread out their development a lot more evenly over time. In other words, Intel has had a head start over AMD; AMD is still playing catch-up and as a result is more active in their development. I think Intel also focuses on things outside/instead of mesa that AMD doesn't spend as much time in, like open-source OpenCL (Beignet) and video encoding.

          Anyway, I figure Intel was actually the one who really did most of the contributions around 2007. That's around the time when the Core i series was starting to get popular, and had Intel's first "APU". AMD at the time made their promises toward open-source, but back then the open drivers were basically an unusable mess. To my understanding, the radeon drivers really started to evolve around 2009-2010. From what I recall, the radeon drivers weren't really a viable substitute to fglrx until right around 2011 or 2012 (so around the time when GCN was released).

          Interesting stuff to think about, though. Of course, I may be wrong about some of the things I said.
          I think you're mostly correct.
          Radeon drivers were a substitute for desktop but nothing else but we have gotten very far thankfully

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          • #6
            This is great! Doesn't seem they are breaking their high score anytime soon though.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by schmidtbag View Post
              Well, seeing as Marek alone might be reaching 1000 commits by the end of the year, I think it's safe to assume radeonsi/amdgpu are collectively the most active. Intel may be more feature-complete, but, their hardware is less complex and they spread out their development a lot more evenly over time. In other words, Intel has had a head start over AMD; AMD is still playing catch-up and as a result is more active in their development. I think Intel also focuses on things outside/instead of mesa that AMD doesn't spend as much time in, like open-source OpenCL (Beignet) and video encoding.
              Intel also has more developers to spread the commits out over, whereas almost all the AMD commits in Mesa go through Marek or Nicolai.

              Anyway, I figure Intel was actually the one who really did most of the contributions around 2007. That's around the time when the Core i series was starting to get popular, and had Intel's first "APU". AMD at the time made their promises toward open-source, but back then the open drivers were basically an unusable mess. To my understanding, the radeon drivers really started to evolve around 2009-2010. From what I recall, the radeon drivers weren't really a viable substitute to fglrx until right around 2011 or 2012 (so around the time when GCN was released).
              I'm guessing it was mostly Intel and VMWare in 2007/08, with the radeon drivers contributing more during 2009-2010. Marek was independent back then, though.

              2007 added OpenGL 2.0/2.1.
              2008 brought around KMS/GEM/DRI2/etc. which was a big process.
              2009 added Gallium, and it may have been in-tree before that. Not sure exactly when that happened, but this also brought lots of new drivers which would bump those commit numbers a lot. r300g started, and continued getting work through 2010.
              2010 was when Intel added the new GLSL compiler, which was a giant project, and the start of the new r600g driver.

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