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Linux 4.13 Adding Write Hints To Allow For Better NVMe Performance

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  • Linux 4.13 Adding Write Hints To Allow For Better NVMe Performance

    Phoronix: Linux 4.13 Adding Write Hints To Allow For Better NVMe Performance

    The block changes for the Linux 4.13 kernel include some interesting changes...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...13-Write-Hints

  • #2
    It would be really cool if browsers could implement support for this... for thier cache and databases.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by cb88 View Post
      It would be really cool if browsers could implement support for this... for thier cache and databases.
      Meh. NVMe is so ridiculously fast that this is hardly worthwhile. But I guess you could. It will probably end up in browsers just because it gets added to SQLite at some point and they integrate it.

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      • #4
        Low end NVMe SSD will be a thing, I suppose. There's even one right now in a way. I casually looked up NVMe SSDs the other day : Intel 600p 128GB is surprisingly cheap, and suprisingly slow.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by debianxfce View Post

          Armbian setups a ram disk and launches Chromium as follows:
          https://github.com/armbian/build/blo.../chromium.conf
          That's the other way. Hoping someone does an eight core Cortex A53 that supports 32GB or 64GB ddr4 then, just so I can read text and watch video on web sites.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by grok View Post
            Intel 600p 128GB is surprisingly cheap, and suprisingly slow.
            why surprisingly ? intel is slow and cheap is slow

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            • #7
              Because Intel is a high end SSD brand, historically at least, and it's slower on writes than SATA SSDs. Albeit 128GB is the new "extra small" size I guess and this explains it being "slow".
              Note that I don't see anything wrong with this, and if PCIe 2x SSD can be cheaper I'll welcome them as well.
              In fact this 600p 128GB still is a tad expensive for an OS + /home drive (for those of us who pay fairly more than the USD with no sales tax price)

              If flash prices come down, flash density get bigger so that small capacity SSD use fewer chips and get slower, low end PC hardware gets NVMe slot(s) -> I think we will see "slow" NVMe drives.

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