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USB Type-C Port Manager Coming To Linux 4.12

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  • starshipeleven
    replied
    Originally posted by torsionbar28 View Post
    I forgot about Thunderbolt, that's another external PCI-E interface with DMA access.
    IOMMU/VT-d to the rescue.

    Leave a comment:


  • torsionbar28
    replied
    Originally posted by torsionbar28 View Post
    Not really. If you have physical access to the machine, you have physical access to the machine. Also, SATA and SAS can both have external interfaces. PCI-E does as well, at least on laptops via ExpressCard.
    I forgot about Thunderbolt, that's another external PCI-E interface with DMA access.

    Leave a comment:


  • ChamPro
    replied
    Originally posted by ckruetze View Post

    Interesting. We are using 4 WD15s in the office with Ubuntu 16.10 (and I think 16.04). And for us the only thing that doesn't work always is the display port. Frequently after a wake up from suspend the monitor on the display port connection will flicker. No problems with the other one connected to HDMI.

    Using a very recent kernel and MESA version improved that a lot, guessing I'd say there is now a 20% chance that the monitor doesn't wake up properly. However turning off the monitor for a minute while using the dock will in most cases restore everything to working again.
    The DisplayPort issue with the WD15 seems to be a hardware issue. We have the same problem with Windows 10.
    There is the newer TB16 Thunderbolt dock. It's a little more than the WD15, but you should get better performance than USB. Unknown about Linux compatibility.

    Leave a comment:


  • uid313
    replied
    Originally posted by H3g3m0n View Post

    It gets worse, physical keyboards are insecure! Anyone can type on them and execute commands as if they are a user!
    At least when I plug in a keyboard then I know that is a keyboard.

    But if I plugin a webcam, a printer or a scanner then I don't want it to identify as a USB HID keyboard and execute commands.

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  • H3g3m0n
    replied
    Originally posted by uid313 View Post
    But USB is insecure.
    A device can act as a keyboard and execute commands as if they were typed by a user.

    FireWire and Thunderbolt are even worse, they have DMA and can read the RAM.
    It gets worse, physical keyboards are insecure! Anyone can type on them and execute commands as if they are a user!

    Leave a comment:


  • FireBurn
    replied
    I wonder if that means my phone will show up when I plug it in via usb-c, currently it's ignored unless it's booted up already connected

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  • torsionbar28
    replied
    Originally posted by Vistaus View Post
    Trump Interfaces???
    No, those are the ones that *improve* security, and clean up all the bugs and memory leaks from the previous interface.

    Originally posted by LEW21 View Post

    There is a big difference between an internal port and an external port.
    Not really. If you have physical access to the machine, you have physical access to the machine. Also, SATA and SAS can both have external interfaces. PCI-E does as well, at least on laptops via ExpressCard.
    Last edited by torsionbar28; 01 May 2017, 10:01 AM.

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  • ckruetze
    replied
    Originally posted by zboson View Post
    I have a Dell Dock WD15 which is a USB type-C to USB type-A hub with ethernet and HDMI/DisplayPort ports. The only thing that really works on with my Ubuntu 16.10 system is the Display Port pass through. At first everything works but then after a say a minute only the video pass through still works. I'm greatly looking forward to better Type-C port support.
    Interesting. We are using 4 WD15s in the office with Ubuntu 16.10 (and I think 16.04). And for us the only thing that doesn't work always is the display port. Frequently after a wake up from suspend the monitor on the display port connection will flicker. No problems with the other one connected to HDMI.

    Using a very recent kernel and MESA version improved that a lot, guessing I'd say there is now a 20% chance that the monitor doesn't wake up properly. However turning off the monitor for a minute while using the dock will in most cases restore everything to working again.

    Leave a comment:


  • zboson
    replied
    I have a Dell Dock WD15 which is a USB type-C to USB type-A hub with ethernet and HDMI/DisplayPort ports. The only thing that really works on with my Ubuntu 16.10 system is the Display Port pass through. At first everything works but then after a say a minute only the video pass through still works. I'm greatly looking forward to better Type-C port support.

    Leave a comment:


  • nanonyme
    replied
    Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
    Having it work kinda like Bluetooth where you need to pair the devices would solve most of the issues. Of course this should be required only by input devices. I don't think there is massive need to encrypt the communication over the wire to avoid hardware keyloggers, but that might be cool to have too.

    When you connect a HID device you get a popup saying "hey I detected keyboard with serial number 536827474, authorize its use with your root password" (and you can write your root password with it but it cannot do anything else like using desktop shortcuts or whatever to try to break into your system)

    With mice it can show an on-screen keyboard and limit mouse input from that device on that part.

    But something like this is not exactly trivial to implement and would break compatibility with most HID devices around. It would be a slaughter the same as the "free upgrade" to Win10.

    Fun fact: when pairing bluetooth keyboards they ask you to write the keyboard's own password by typing on it, and it's plain retarded for a security standpoint, but we all know Bluetooth is unsafe anyway.
    And the first keyboard would need to skip this check since otherwise you end up with catch-22 where you can't connect a keyboard to the machine because you need an already connected keyboard to type the root password. In reality you can't really solve this except for laptops with builtin keyboards properly since any software solution would be laughably complex and require changes in most parts of display and input stack
    Last edited by nanonyme; 01 May 2017, 02:42 AM.

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