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Kernel Lockdown: Tightening Up Linux Kernel Access From User-Space

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  • Kernel Lockdown: Tightening Up Linux Kernel Access From User-Space

    Phoronix: Kernel Lockdown: Tightening Up Linux Kernel Access From User-Space

    Red Hat developer David Howells has posted a series of patches to make it possible to lock-down the running Linux kernel image in an effort to prevent user-space from modifying the running kernel image...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...ckdown-Patches

  • #2
    Any reason stated *why* he is posting these patches?

    Comment


    • #3
      I would like GRUB to display a warning when the system is not configured to use secure boot.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by AdamOne View Post
        Any reason stated *why* he is posting these patches?
        because he wrote them

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by AdamOne View Post
          Any reason stated *why* he is posting these patches?
          To increase security for those that want it?

          Comment


          • #6
            Hm, this seems to overlap in functionality with GRSec a bit.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by AdamOne View Post
              Any reason stated *why* he is posting these patches?
              Because hacking servers is big business right now, and people are trying to stop that?

              Comment


              • #8
                More security is always better, but there's the other side too: Has anyone an idea how this would influence the desktop experience of a normal user? Ideally, there would be no difference, but seeing the depth of some (/dev/port, hibernation) of the changes makes me wonder.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by lowflyer View Post
                  More security is always better...
                  No it isn’t. Better for what? Security is a means to an end, not an end in itself.

                  Has anyone an idea how this would influence the desktop experience of a normal user?
                  Has your “experience” been impacted much by the coming of SELinux or AppArmor?

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by smitty3268 View Post

                    Because hacking servers is big business right now, and people are trying to stop that?
                    But people already stopped that: the GRsec kernel team.

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