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Linux 4.11 Doesn't Change The Game For AMD's Ryzen

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  • Linux 4.11 Doesn't Change The Game For AMD's Ryzen

    Phoronix: Linux 4.11 Doesn't Change The Game For AMD's Ryzen

    Linux 4.11 is worthwhile in that it's bringing ALC1220 audio support, the codec used by many Ryzen (and Intel Kabylake) motherboards, but this next kernel version doesn't appear to change Ryzen's performance...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...n-7-Linux-4.11

  • #2
    phoronix Michael could you please update the Ryzen CPU Core Scaling article? You did not really test what you were thinking to test. We made it clear in the comments.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by juno View Post
      phoronix Michael could you please update the Ryzen CPU Core Scaling article? You did not really test what you were thinking to test. We made it clear in the comments.
      i had already updated it.
      Michael Larabel
      https://www.michaellarabel.com/

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      • #4
        http://wccftech.com/amd-ryzen-launch...-amd-response/

        1) Early motherboard BIOSes were certainly troubled: disabling unrelated features would turn off cores. Setting memory overclocks on some motherboards would disable boost. Some BIOS revisions would plain produce universally suppressed performance.

        2) Ryzen benefits from disabling High Precision Event Timers (HPET). The timer resolution of HPET can cause an observer effect that can subtract performance. This is a BIOS option, or a function that can be disabled from the Windows command shell.

        3) Ryzen benefits from enabling the High Performance power profile. This overrides core parking. Eventually we will have a driver that allows people to stay on balanced and disable core parking anyways. Gamers have been doing this for a while, too. I misspoke, here. I want to clarify the benefit: High Performance mode allows the CPU to update its voltage/clockspeed in 1ms, vs. the 30ms that it takes balanced mode. This is what our driver will accomplish. Apologies for the confusion!
        looks like a BIOS update and additional kernel changes are needed for windows. A similar thing would be needed for linux

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        • #5
          new tech is not alway's great better wait a few day's....

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          • #6
            The performance improvements in dota are pretty significant. Wish more games were tested.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by molecule-eye View Post
              The performance improvements in dota are pretty significant. Wish more games were tested.
              These improvements are likely tied to AMDGPU code changes.

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              • #8
                He, he, that reminds me on AMDGPU-PRO users with Ryzen will probably wait for a driver to support appropriate kernel at about Christmas.

                Till that happen, professional AMD users will use Raspberry Pi
                Last edited by dungeon; 05 March 2017, 12:03 PM.

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                • #9
                  What I find very interesting would be a comparison of cinebench R15 on windows 7, windows 10 and linux (wine) to show differences in scheduling performance. Ryzen is said to be faster on win 7 then on win 10 in some workloads, so maybe it is even faster on linux?

                  Also, would wine have a big difference on cinebench perormance due to overhead?
                  Last edited by kiffmet; 05 March 2017, 12:38 PM.

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                  • #10
                    The ... testing configuration sheet (?) at the beginning of the articles seems to have a typo specifying that the Processor has '(16 cores)', instead of '(16 threads)'.

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