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Ten Exciting Features Of The Linux 4.10 Kernel

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  • BangoMopar
    replied
    Originally posted by L_A_G View Post

    Thanks! I'll look into that when I have the time (some hardware my employer ordered in mid December arrived yesterday and we're probably going to be pretty busy for the next few weeks because of it).
    Good luck let us know how it goes!

    Leave a comment:


  • L_A_G
    replied
    Originally posted by BangoMopar View Post
    Assuming you're on an Ubuntu-based distro, here's a super easy script to always keep your kernel to the latest and greatest: https://gist.github.com/mmstick/8493727. Keep in mind that should you run into a kernel issue (I haven't yet) the previous kernel is always saved to allow you to boot into that one and get rid of the offending one. In my case, I'm running kernel 4.9.10, which was released today. Don't let the fact that these kernels are not official scare you. They are stock Linux kernels that automatically have any Ubuntu-specific patches applied.
    Thanks! I'll look into that when I have the time (some hardware my employer ordered in mid December arrived yesterday and we're probably going to be pretty busy for the next few weeks because of it).

    Leave a comment:


  • edoantonioco
    replied
    brightness buttons finally works on ASUS laptops since this kernel, this is great

    Leave a comment:


  • BangoMopar
    replied
    Originally posted by debianxfce View Post

    Xfce is most stable desktop in the world, [blah blah blah]
    I sure hope you get paid to shill Xfce as much as you do. I'm running KDE Neon, and no matter how many posts you evangelize and worship Debian + Xfce, I'm not changing. It's one thing to be a fan...or even a super-fan perhaps...but you take things to a level that, when appearing in almost every thread, becomes a bit too much. Also, please stop telling free software users what they do or don't want. kthxbye.

    Leave a comment:


  • BangoMopar
    replied
    Originally posted by L_A_G View Post
    I hope they backport those Ryzen patches to earlier kernel versions.

    I'm planning on buying a Ryzen CPU day one and because most distros don't update the kernel willy-nilly I'd hate to have to have to start messing with the kernel break the "If you don't need to fiddle with it, THEN DON'T FIDDLE WITH IT!!!" policy I try to follow with things like this.
    Assuming you're on an Ubuntu-based distro, here's a super easy script to always keep your kernel to the latest and greatest: https://gist.github.com/mmstick/8493727. Keep in mind that should you run into a kernel issue (I haven't yet) the previous kernel is always saved to allow you to boot into that one and get rid of the offending one. In my case, I'm running kernel 4.9.10, which was released today. Don't let the fact that these kernels are not official scare you. They are stock Linux kernels that automatically have any Ubuntu-specific patches applied.

    Leave a comment:


  • bug77
    replied
    Originally posted by debianxfce View Post

    Xfce is most stable desktop in the world, you do not want that desktop code is under heavy development all the time like it is with buggy ubuntu unity, gnome3, kde, bugie etc.Xfce is ready, because it is freely configurable. other desktops are not freely configurable and they are developed towards Xfce, for example:
    Video recorded on Arch Linux with GNOME 3.22Dash To Dock Extensionhttps://github.com/micheleg/dash-to-dockDash To Panelhttps://github.com/jderose9/dash-to-pa...


    Gnome3 and Unity are great example of stupidity, several years of non sense development and they are starting to look like Xfce.
    Actually, I do. And I also want a compositor. Did that ever cross your mind?
    Last edited by bug77; 14 February 2017, 05:52 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • L_A_G
    replied
    Originally posted by tegs View Post
    You could always use something like Solus where you will get the latest kernel and MESA without the wild west nature of Arch.
    The only problem with that is that I don't need the latest kernel version all that often. Come to think about it, this is the first time I've actually wanted to have the latest kernel version. However it would probably be different if I was using an AMD graphics card rather than an Nvidia one with the binary blob drivers,


    Originally posted by debianxfce View Post
    There is Debian testing and bugs are fixed. Debian stable has about 400 bugs that newer gets fixed and it breaks when using testing,sid, experimental and ubuntu packages. With Debian testing you can use all of the packages, and it is Oipaf ppa yakkety compatible.
    One of the reason why they make testing builds in the first place is that they can be used to test bugfixes and ensure they actually fix bugs and don't introduce new bugs of their own before said fixes are merged into the next stable build. Because of that it's completely stupid to compare stable builds to testing ones on pure bug counts.

    Software is quicker and easier to test and bug fixing is faster than with cars. In the distributions there are many software that are under heavy development. In Debian stable you have buggy kde and device drivers.
    Yes and conversely it's also much quicker and easier to add new faults into software. With cars the manufacturers release new models every few years and spend the years in between improving them by fixing faults that weren't discovered during initial development.

    Leave a comment:


  • tegs
    replied
    Originally posted by L_A_G View Post
    I hope they backport those Ryzen patches to earlier kernel versions.

    I'm planning on buying a Ryzen CPU day one and because most distros don't update the kernel willy-nilly I'd hate to have to have to start messing with the kernel break the "If you don't need to fiddle with it, THEN DON'T FIDDLE WITH IT!!!" policy I try to follow with things like this.
    You could always use something like Solus where you will get the latest kernel and MESA without the wild west nature of Arch.

    Leave a comment:


  • gilboa
    replied
    Originally posted by debianxfce View Post

    Back porting and "stable" distributions are waste of resources.

    1 It is very easy to compile kernel with Debian after you have valid .config file:
    git clone -b drm-next-4.11-wip git://people.freedesktop.org/~agd5f/linux
    cd linux/
    export CONCURRENCY_LEVEL=4
    fakeroot make-kpkg --initrd kernel_image

    2. Stable distros have old and buggy software, see bugzillas.
    Yeah. Lets tell all the people that run 5'9s databases on 1M USD servers to throw away RHEL and start rolling their own kernel on Debian unstable.
    Your ignorance is only rivaled by the utter conviction in which you spew this bullshit.

    - Gilboa

    Leave a comment:


  • bug77
    replied
    Originally posted by L_A_G View Post

    What you're saying is basically the same as saying that brand new models of cars are better and have fewer faults than models that have been on the market for a few years and actually had the time to start manifesting problems like leaking seals, electrical faults, and failures of belts, bearings, hinges and other moving parts susceptible to wear and tear.
    Nope. What he's saying is everybody should run Debian testing+Xfce+Wicd. Conversely, you absolutely shouldn't use PulseAudio (because Xfce doesn't) or a compositor (because Xfce's is buggy as hell).
    Come to think about it, he's not saying, he's parroting it.

    Leave a comment:

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