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4-Disk Btrfs Native RAID Performance On Linux 4.10

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  • #71
    Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
    Seems like there is a guy on mailing list that reports btrfs on kernel 4.11-rc8 is able to scrub and fix correctly (manually-induced) corruption on a RAID5 array. http://www.spinics.net/lists/linux-btrfs/msg64917.html
    Isn't the bugfix supposed to be on 4.12 onwards?

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    • #72
      Originally posted by Zucca View Post
      Isn't the bugfix supposed to be on 4.12 onwards?
      Kernel 4.12 does not "exist" yet, it's still a pile of patches on top of 4.11 https://www.kernel.org/

      He has applied the same patches on top of the most new existing kernel.

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      • #73
        Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
        Kernel 4.12 does not "exist" yet, it's still a pile of patches on top of 4.11
        I kinda meant that there isn't a fix yet, unless backporting/patching.

        I can wait for 4.12, since I currently use btrfs-raid10.

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        • #74
          Originally posted by starshipeleven View Post
          Unless Intel in their great understanding decides to add the hotswap feature to the new PCIe revision. After all we have already reached a level where the bandwith is effectively ridicolous even for GPUs so they do need a good reason to keep newer revisions interesting.
          PCIe already does support hot plugging. The problem is that it doesn't work well if you just yank it out. It's like a USB flash drive. If you yank it out while it's writing, who knows what will happen.

          The operating system needs to support it, by providing some kind of GUI (I think there already are command-line tools in Linux and Windows) to show the device visually, so you get the correct one and buttons to turn it off. A fancy server motherboard might have status lights and maybe a button or switch to notify the OS that you're about to pull a card.

          This has some details: https://electronics.stackexchange.co...rk-in-practice

          If you've ever played with a Microsoft Surface Book, you will have seen their clever hardware / software latch that connects the screen and the base. The base has an Nvidia GPU in it and it's connected with PCIe. The switch means that it won't physically disconnect until the software is ready for it.

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