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Persistent Memory Was A Popular Topic At This Week's LinuxCon Europe

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  • Persistent Memory Was A Popular Topic At This Week's LinuxCon Europe

    Phoronix: Persistent Memory Was A Popular Topic At This Week's LinuxCon Europe

    With Intel's 3D Xpoint Optane technology beginning to appear as extremely fast non-volatile memory and other advancing efforts in the NVDIMM space like ReRAM, persistent memory was a popular topic at this week's LinuxCon Europe event in Berlin...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...ory-Linux-2016

  • #2
    Very interresting, this persistent memory can make systems evolve in a great way. Does anyone have informations about the cost / GB of this future technology?

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Passso View Post
      Very interresting, this persistent memory can make systems evolve in a great way. Does anyone have informations about the cost / GB of this future technology?
      You hit the spot with that question.
      Also we need to have into account that SSDs are (finally) becoming the norm. This tech would be way more usefull and ground breaking if that wasn't the case...

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Passso View Post
        Very interresting, this persistent memory can make systems evolve in a great way. Does anyone have informations about the cost / GB of this future technology?
        persistent memory technology has no cost, it is a way of talking to storage via memory interface. implementations of it do have cost, but cost depends on implementation. most of current nvdimms are dram with battery so they cost as dram with battery

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        • #5
          While I applaud the progress, I can't prevent getting a deja vu feeling of EMS. Of course EMS was paged in, but could then be DMA'd to another part of memory.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by pal666 View Post
            persistent memory technology has no cost, it is a way of talking to storage via memory interface. implementations of it do have cost, but cost depends on implementation. most of current nvdimms are dram with battery so they cost as dram with battery
            There's MRAM too.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by pal666 View Post
              persistent memory technology has no cost, it is a way of talking to storage via memory interface. implementations of it do have cost, but cost depends on implementation. most of current nvdimms are dram with battery so they cost as dram with battery
              Hmmm... From what I understand it is a brand new technology so that no battery is needed, so there will be a new process and a new price/GB.

              This may merge memory and storage on the same component and modify the way a computer works.

              But OFC you can add a battery, or even let your computer running and say it is persistent... as long as you have battery XD

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              • #8
                Finally: I talked of this before SSD was developed.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Passso View Post
                  Hmmm... From what I understand it is a brand new technology so that no battery is needed
                  yes, if "technology" is intel 3d xpoint. no, if "technology" is persistent memory

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Passso View Post
                    But OFC you can add a battery, or even let your computer running and say it is persistent... as long as you have battery XD
                    They early 2000s' Palm PDAs would like to say "hi" to you.

                    Note: Back then some other company had managed to land a patent on using flash memory as storage medium on PDAs. Instead of paying the patent, Palm went for using only RAM + batteries in their PDAs. Part of this memory is used as actual RAM for the programms, the rest is used as a form of persistent storage (Thanks to the battery) on which databases where used to store the data.

                    In other words: it's been 20 years since mass produced computers have been using persistent RAM as storage.

                    Even back then, this permitted extremely fast application swtiching, searching of storage, etc.

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