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Linux 4.9: F2FS Gets Performance Enhancements, EXT4 Gets Fixes

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  • Linux 4.9: F2FS Gets Performance Enhancements, EXT4 Gets Fixes

    Phoronix: Linux 4.9: F2FS Gets Performance Enhancements, EXT4 Gets Fixes

    The F2FS (Flash-Friendly File-System) and EXT4 file-system feature updates have been sent in for the Linux 4.9 merge window...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...F2FS-Linux-4.9

  • #2
    "Lots of bug fixes and cleanups" - Theodore Ts'o isn't quite clear in his statement and makes it sound as if Ext4 is heavily bugged. Seems however it's primarily code refactoring, clean-ups and only a few bug fixes. Nothing too serious or to worry about.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by sdack View Post
      "Lots of bug fixes and cleanups" - Theodore Ts'o isn't quite clear in his statement and makes it sound as if Ext4 is heavily bugged. Seems however it's primarily code refactoring, clean-ups and only a few bug fixes. Nothing too serious or to worry about.
      Good, that worried me too. Glad that's the case. Wonder if there will ever be a kernel update that doesn't mention fixing bugs in a filesystem I use :/ filesystem bugs are some of the most scary bugs to me, wouldn't want to lose my data (yeah, keep backups blah blah blah)

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      • #4
        Ok, but how long to use the F2FS to install an operating system as lubuntu or other to an USB flash memory?

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Azrael5 View Post
          Ok, but how long to use the F2FS to install an operating system as lubuntu or other to an USB flash memory?
          You can always do your own partitioning and formatting and install whichever distro to those filesystems you create which could be F2FS if you so desire.

          You just need to make sure that your boot partition uses a filesystem that your bootloader (e.g. GRUB or whatever you use) can read, and that your root partition is something your kernel can read without needing to load modules on that very same root filesystem (i.e. you need F2FS either compiled into your kernel or you need it in an initramfs).

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Azrael5 View Post
            Ok, but how long to use the F2FS to install an operating system as lubuntu or other to an USB flash memory?
            generic PC operating system would kill your USB flash memory pretty fast, regardless of the file system being used. Too many writes happening all the time for USB flash to last long. My 2 cents.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by aht0 View Post
              generic PC operating system would kill your USB flash memory pretty fast, regardless of the file system being used. Too many writes happening all the time for USB flash to last long. My 2 cents.
              While the general statement still true, most post 2010 USB flash drives implement some kind of wear leveling in their firmware, so they tend to last much much longer than before.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Azrael5 View Post
                Ok, but how long to use the F2FS to install an operating system as lubuntu or other to an USB flash memory?
                You need to ask the bootloader developers (people making GRUB2) to add support for that, linux kernel works fine in a f2fs partition, the issue is the bootloader that can't read f2fs so cannot read/load/start linux kernel in a f2fs partition when you power up the PC.

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                • #9
                  Which can be easily resolved by simply creating a boot partition based on any EXT# FS whuch will also give you that real basic fallback in the event your root partition gives out (and in the case of unjournalled FS's, will likely be often if thres lots if writing)

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