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Vim 8.0 Released With GTK3 Support, Async I/O & DirectX Support

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  • gilboa
    replied
    Using it right now on Fedora via vim-unstable copr.
    No issues what-so-ever.
    Large file support, at least as far as I can see, has improved considerably.

    - Gilboa

    Leave a comment:


  • SystemCrasher
    replied
    Originally posted by Tomin View Post
    It's just font rendering stuff.
    Still, DirectX support in text editor sounds quite funny to my taste, especially in vim, sorry .

    Leave a comment:


  • Tomin
    replied
    Originally posted by SystemCrasher View Post
    Oh, wow, it isn't first april today, right? Then it sounds like Emacs got a heavy blow from its ancient rival. Has Emacs got DirectX support? Though most recent trend is Vulkan so I wold vouch for Vulkan instead. DirectX is way too vendor locked, after all.
    It's just font rendering stuff.

    Leave a comment:


  • SystemCrasher
    replied
    Vim 8.0 adds support for the GTK+ 3 tool-kit and Microsoft Windows users even have DirectX support.
    Oh, wow, it isn't first april today, right? Then it sounds like Emacs got a heavy blow from its ancient rival. Has Emacs got DirectX support? Though most recent trend is Vulkan so I wold vouch for Vulkan instead. DirectX is way too vendor locked, after all.

    Leave a comment:


  • AppTeF
    replied
    Originally posted by renox View Post
    It's useful on a laptop's keyboard but on my full keyboard the Home, page-up, page-down keys are easier and faster to find than the equivalent keys you listed,
    so YMMV.
    Your hand move less when using C-f / C-b / $ / ^ or 0 than pg-up/pg-dn/home/end

    Plus, put your cursor in the middle of a line and try to perform d$ (press u to undo) and d "end-key" you'll see the result isn't the same.


    You have to try it few weeks to see how powerful (neo)vim is.

    Leave a comment:


  • oneofone
    replied
    About time... a little bit late though, I have moved few years ago to sublime 3 and recently to vscode which just works perfectly on Linux.

    Leave a comment:


  • renox
    replied
    Originally posted by Michael_S View Post
    Ctrl-f or Ctrl-b to go up or down a page at a time without reaching for the page-down and page-up keys or scrolling a mouse. ^ (caret) to jump to the beginning of the current line without reaching for the Home key.
    It's useful on a laptop's keyboard but on my full keyboard the Home, page-up, page-down keys are easier and faster to find than the equivalent keys you listed,
    so YMMV.


    Leave a comment:


  • Michael_S
    replied
    Originally posted by ElectricPrism View Post

    I have to poise the possibility that more work may "appear" to be getting done but more work not "actually" getting done in the same timeframe.

    It's like when mr computer illiterate hear furious keyboard typing they assume lots of things are happening, and for a non VIM user to watch someone in VIM it might appear as if lots of things are happening.

    When you have clients just just throw down some $tree / and $cmatrix and $sl, and throw up a VIM editor in a i3 window manager and maybe some $rsync $ranger and $htop and $iftop and $iotop while you're at it to impress.
    Often a lot of things are happening, though. Little things add up. Ctrl-f or Ctrl-b to go up or down a page at a time without reaching for the page-down and page-up keys or scrolling a mouse. ^ (caret) to jump to the beginning of the current line without reaching for the Home key. (line number)G to jump to a specific line. gg to jump to the first line. GG to jump to the last line. $ to jump to the end instead of hitting the end key. 5e to jump to the end of the 5th word in front of you. v to start selecting text at the cursor for copy or paste without grabbing the mouse. "ey to copy the current highlighted text into a buffer named "e" for pasting later. "fy to delete the current highlighted text and put it into a buffer named "f" for pasting later. /\cint to search the file in a forward direction for any string matching "int", case insensitive. ?Int to search the file backwards for any string matching "Int", case-sensitive. Other editors often let you search with Ctrl-f or similar, but you usually have to click back and forth between the search box and your editor.

    And that's just most of the tricks I know off-hand. I haven't become skilled with using multiple buffers or split screen. I also haven't bothered to learn bookmarks. I admit, I usually switch between terminal tabs to execute external commands instead of using :! to run the command from within Vim. But when you're familiar with enough of these tricks, you really are able to work more quickly than you could with many other editing tools.

    Now to be fair, IDEs give you auto-complete and jump-to-declaration and Vim doesn't. I understand there are Vim plugins that add forms of it, but as far as I know they're not as feature-full as Eclipse or IntelliJ. I do use an IDE a lot at work.

    Leave a comment:


  • ElectricPrism
    replied
    Originally posted by emblemparade View Post
    Why not use both?
    Is that really practical for the average programmer?

    Originally posted by emblemparade View Post
    I disagree with all of this. I'm not a vim expert myself, but I've seen experts at work and they can do complicated things much faster than I can with my derp derp skills.
    I have to poise the possibility that more work may "appear" to be getting done but more work not "actually" getting done in the same timeframe.

    It's like when mr computer illiterate hear furious keyboard typing they assume lots of things are happening, and for a non VIM user to watch someone in VIM it might appear as if lots of things are happening.

    When you have clients just just throw down some $tree / and $cmatrix and $sl, and throw up a VIM editor in a i3 window manager and maybe some $rsync $ranger and $htop and $iftop and $iotop while you're at it to impress.

    Leave a comment:


  • emblemparade
    replied
    Originally posted by Michael_S View Post
    There's tons of value - no sarcasm or snark in tended - in a tool with a short learning curve. Atom, or SublimeText, or similar tools are great for all of the things they can manage and the fact that you can do most of them within an hour of first installing the tool.
    Why not use both?

    Originally posted by Michael_S View Post
    Vim is a poor substitute until you have enough skill with it to use many of its features quickly.
    I disagree with all of this. I'm not a vim expert myself, but I've seen experts at work and they can do complicated things much faster than I can with my derp derp skills.

    Still, even the basics I know make vim superb for console work. I end up using vim quite a lot indeed. I guess I should learn how to become an expert in it.

    Leave a comment:

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