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Vim 8.0 Released With GTK3 Support, Async I/O & DirectX Support

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  • Vim 8.0 Released With GTK3 Support, Async I/O & DirectX Support

    Phoronix: Vim 8.0 Released With GTK3 Support, Async I/O & DirectX Support

    Vi IMproved has been further improved with today's Vim 8.0 release. In fact, this is the first major release of Vim in the past decade!..

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...m-8.0-Released

  • #2
    Wow what happened?! Did NeoVim force Bram M to forcefully wake up? Interesting release anyhow, I'm surprised by the scope in the release! I'm still mainly a Vim-user (since NeoVim has some ways to go before being fully stable on Linux and also usable on Windows (at work) out-of-the-box for instance) so I'll be welcoming the update.

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    • #3
      I switched from zillions of text editors to vim and have loved it, but the slowness of the progress and some platform differences in plugins is making me consider emacs

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      • #4
        I love vim. Have been using it since a year ago, but I also want it to be usable in windows. Some unbearable plugin platform difference like fzf and neovim not being supported properly in windows is making me think about emacs.

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        • #5
          I use Atom. Vim is too confusing for me to understand how to use. Also Atom feels more modern than Vim for me.
          Vim feels like a TUI-application that is shoehorned to fit into the GUI world which is the post-TUI world.

          Nice with GTK 3 support though. It would be cool if Vim and Neovim could merge or something, to reduce duplicate effort and resources.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by uid313 View Post
            I use Atom. Vim is too confusing for me to understand how to use. Also Atom feels more modern than Vim for me.
            Vim feels like a TUI-application that is shoehorned to fit into the GUI world which is the post-TUI world.
            Nice, I like Atom as well, at least after adding lots of extensions. But that's good, the editor should be lean, as long as it's extendable. But I still like Vim, the editing commands are so wonderful. There are Vim-plugins to Atom though, so that's always a possibility.

            Originally posted by uid313 View Post
            Nice with GTK 3 support though. It would be cool if Vim and Neovim could merge or something, to reduce duplicate effort and resources.
            Well, yes and no. NeoVim is doing something that Vim will never do, that is "Remove all the old cruft that hinders a quicker development pace, by dropping backwards compatibility.". They are diverging more and more, so even though it might be a good idea to not duplicate development effort (and resources), it might not be applicable in this case.

            Vim are currently saying "no" to patches that is written in C89 and break compilers from before 1989, The reason for that is that they think that the code should always be backwards compatible for the developers that maintain those architectures/platforms. NeoVim thought that that reasoning was the big reason for Vim not doing a release more often than every 10 years, and that every change was a horror to merge, because you never knew what platform would break (and there were no tests for the older ones).

            Here's a nice link for you to read: http://geoff.greer.fm/2015/01/15/why...tter-than-vim/

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            • #7
              Originally posted by uid313 View Post
              I use Atom. Vim is too confusing for me to understand how to use. Also Atom feels more modern than Vim for me.
              Vim feels like a TUI-application that is shoehorned to fit into the GUI world which is the post-TUI world.

              Nice with GTK 3 support though. It would be cool if Vim and Neovim could merge or something, to reduce duplicate effort and resources.
              Since Atom is GUI only it's another category than emacs/vim IMHO.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Kemosabe View Post

                Since Atom is GUI only it's another category than emacs/vim IMHO.
                Atom is an embedded web browser, emacs is an embedded operating system, vim is a text editor.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by uid313 View Post
                  I use Atom. Vim is too confusing for me to understand how to use. Also Atom feels more modern than Vim for me.
                  Vim feels like a TUI-application that is shoehorned to fit into the GUI world which is the post-TUI world.

                  Nice with GTK 3 support though. It would be cool if Vim and Neovim could merge or something, to reduce duplicate effort and resources.
                  Agree, hope neovim raises this bar up

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by uid313 View Post
                    I use Atom. Vim is too confusing for me to understand how to use. Also Atom feels more modern than Vim for me.
                    Vim feels like a TUI-application that is shoehorned to fit into the GUI world which is the post-TUI world.
                    There's tons of value - no sarcasm or snark in tended - in a tool with a short learning curve. Atom, or SublimeText, or similar tools are great for all of the things they can manage and the fact that you can do most of them within an hour of first installing the tool.

                    Vim is a poor substitute until you have enough skill with it to use many of its features quickly. Multiple copy-paste buffers, macros, macro recording, multiple-macro execution, whole file regex substitutions, selective line regex substitutions, multiple editing buffers, undo/redo, fast document navigation, easy ability to run terminal commands while you're editing, easy ability to run terminal commands and capture the output in one of your open buffers, free-form select and delete. And crucially, all of those things without taking your fingers off the home row keys.

                    Even then, I don't know Vim is worth the effort to learn unless you use ssh a lot. I do, so being able to work one things remotely with a tool that I can use almost as quickly as Atom is really handy.

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