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Reaper Audio Software Is Coming To Linux

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  • Reaper Audio Software Is Coming To Linux

    Phoronix: Reaper Audio Software Is Coming To Linux

    If Audacity and Ardour aren't cutting it for your audio editing needs on Linux, there's another Digital Audio Workstation (DAW) option coming to Linux: Reaper...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...-DAW-For-Linux

  • #2
    Cool. I would love for there to be a comparable free software package so I don't need to virtualize; but Reaper is an excellent DAW and I'm excited to see it come to Linux; it's one of the reasons my brother remains on Windows for recording.

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    • #3
      There is also Bitwig, which was developed by ex-ableton employees. The big problem we still have though if that is still too difficult to get Jack running on any normal distribution

      In Windows and osx, latency free audio is almost seamless

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Auzy View Post
        There is also Bitwig, which was developed by ex-ableton employees. The big problem we still have though if that is still too difficult to get Jack running on any normal distribution

        In Windows and osx, latency free audio is almost seamless
        Bitwig does not require Jack and latency without Jack is also not that bad.

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        • #5
          Hi, Its been over 4-6 year i check phoronix everyday, and its been a while i should have registered on the forum... but now here I am. It is funny, since yesterday, i was looking at reaper and i was checking if it was compatible with linux (every 5 month, i check DAW). And today, it is. It happen to me quite often i look for something and the day after, it is on phoronix (coincidence, i know, but its quite funny).

          Just wanted to point out that from the page you posted, it seem they got a build for armv7. Raspberry PI as audio workstation ?!?!?! Well, only future will tell.

          I now intend to set up a Renoise + Reaper workflow. There is just one thing that lack in my current equation... which audio interface to take. I need a cheap audio interface with 1 audio(16 bit is enough, more is better) in, 1 Midi and.... thats all. I want to create some hardware synthesizer, thus i need a audio in and a midi out to control them. And compatible with linux of course.

          On the side question, anyone know good VST that can work in linux (not trough wine).

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          • #6
            All my audio equipment run smoother on Linux. On MS OS it would freeze on recording-peaks, but less common with my Red Hat distro.

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            • #7
              I was using Reaper in Wine. That stopped working when WineASIO stopped working. So now I switched to Windows for Reaper.

              However, I need VSTs. Do they work in the Linux Reaper version? Without access to Windows VSTs, Reaper would be useless.

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              • #8
                If Ardour wasn't so good, this would be very welcome news, but it's still nice

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                • #9
                  Awesome!! Starting to get spoilt for choice Bitwig,T7 tracktion,the usual suspects and my current non bloated favourite the NON family (used together or separate,non-timeline,non-mixer, non-sequencer,non-session manager) and now Reaper

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Auzy View Post
                    There is also Bitwig, which was developed by ex-ableton employees. The big problem we still have though if that is still too difficult to get Jack running on any normal distribution

                    In Windows and osx, latency free audio is almost seamless
                    I would say that is true of OSX but definately not Windows. Last time I had to set up a machine for audio production I had a hell of time with Asio4all vs the Soundcards Asio drivers vs the Windows sound system. Only one of these drivers can have access to the soundcard at any given time and you still have to know about turning cpu reclocking off if you want reliability at low latencies. This in practice was even more fiddly than setting up a Linux box for professional recording.

                    Jack setup on Debian based systems is a *lot* easier than it used to be, When jack is installed it will ask you if you want to allow it realtime access privelages as long as you say yes the rest of it should be pretty easy.

                    It would be nice though if Cadence was in the standard Debian repository. When setting up a linux system for audio work I really reccomend the tools that come with KXStudio. Cadence is a really nice control center professional audio on Linux.

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