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Samba 4.4 Is Coming With Asynchronous Flush Requests

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  • Samba 4.4 Is Coming With Asynchronous Flush Requests

    Phoronix: Samba 4.4 Is Coming With Asynchronous Flush Requests

    Samba 4.4 Release Candidate 1 was tagged today in getting ready the next major version of this open-source SMB/CIFS implementation...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...=Samba-4.4-RC1

  • #2
    Samba is a piece of garbage through and through, can't we get a usable alternative, I mean at least for linux to linux file sharing?

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    • #3
      Originally posted by rabcor View Post
      Samba is a piece of garbage through and through, can't we get a usable alternative, I mean at least for linux to linux file sharing?
      Why? It works quite well. It just has some old warts. The samba wiki is quite good. You could try to read: https://wiki.samba.org/index.php/Standalone_server? But perhaps sshfs is what you are looking for?

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Wilfred View Post
        Why? It works quite well. It just has some old warts. The samba wiki is quite good. You could try to read: https://wiki.samba.org/index.php/Standalone_server? But perhaps sshfs is what you are looking for?
        Or nfs?

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        • #5
          How does NFS work anyway? Probably just misconfigured something with OpenMediaVault, but it seems like anyone can freely just look through my NFS shares without any authentication. I thought NFS worked with the actual Linux account info of the client machine.

          In any case, I use regular FTP on my own network for file transfers, NFS for media sharing to Kodi, and SMB for a PS2 ISO loader

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          • #6
            I did some search and NFSv4 has support for security and authentication. Probably via Kerberos. More information can be found in Ubuntu's NFSv4 community help page, even though this is more for Ubuntu users and not CentOS. I'm unsure if there are packages for krb5-user and libpam-krb5. Arch Linux has only krb5 when searched through pacman and that's it.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by rabcor View Post
              Samba is a piece of garbage through and through, can't we get a usable alternative, I mean at least for linux to linux file sharing?

              If you're using Samba for sharing files between Linux boxes, then you're doing it wrong. Samba is designed for a user (client) to connect to a share on a server. If a Linux box has mounted a SMB share. The users on the box will be mapped to a single user on that share. That is not what you want for a server. NFS, on the other hand, is for SERVERS to share files with SERVERS, independent of the user. When a user on a server accesses a file on the other server via NFS, the user information is passed along automatically. Since there can be multiple users logged into a system at once, and all of the users can access the NFS share at the same time, it would be bad if the share was authenticated by a single user. Unix was designed from the ground up to be a multi-user system, so NFS had to support this idea from the start.

              There is more security in NFS these days than just saying, "This server can mount this path". The basics of NFS was that a server would trust another server without credentials! Later, Kerberos was tied into NFS so a server would have to present a service ticket to mount and access the share. Again, the SERVER is presenting a ticket to mount the NFS share, not a user.

              Try NFS with your boxes, MUCH better than trying to use Samba. NFS is the native protocol for Unix, so use it!
              Last edited by jeffgus; 01-27-2016, 04:04 AM.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Espionage724 View Post
                How does NFS work anyway? Probably just misconfigured something with OpenMediaVault, but it seems like anyone can freely just look through my NFS shares without any authentication. I thought NFS worked with the actual Linux account info of the client machine.
                Yes, that is how NFS works. That is why it was important to use 'netgroups' or IP blocks to mask which servers were allowed to talk to NFS. The problem is that IP's can be spoofed, so it isn't serious security. NFS networks had to be firewalled from untrusted networks.

                The proper way to auth NFS is to use Kerberos which has the concept of users, hosts, and services. Kerberos can grant a ticket to a host so that is can access a particular service like NFS.
                Last edited by jeffgus; 01-27-2016, 04:04 AM.

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                • #9
                  But Samba 4.4 will be the only way on Linux to achieve multichannel, either on a single adapter with RSS or across multiple adapters for a major boost in throughput.

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                  • #10
                    So in short there is no real alternative to SAMBA for linux ? if you want a design like a Server and multiple clients connected, the typical use case being a NAS at home

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