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    erendorn
    Senior Member

  • erendorn
    replied
    Originally posted by Cyber Killer View Post
    Pretty much this - every reasonable organisation with more than 10 employees and multiple printers has some proper print server set up to manage this and doesn't require employees fiddling with adding printers manually.

    In other words - this is an issue for you because you want to make this an issue.
    Doesn't that makes it awkward for choosing the actual printer you want to use each time? Unless you have a pull infrastructure for printing, but I doubt every organization has that.

    Leave a comment:

  • Cyber Killer
    Senior Member

  • Cyber Killer
    replied
    Originally posted by Luke_Wolf View Post
    I'm a software dev not a sys admin so I may be offbase here but wouldn't the right way to handle that be to set up one computer (could even just be a virtual machine or jail/chroot on a local server) as a CUPS print server and then have all the other computers set up to talk to it, which will then go across the network to talk to your printers, that way configuration is centralized and everything.
    Pretty much this - every reasonable organisation with more than 10 employees and multiple printers has some proper print server set up to manage this and doesn't require employees fiddling with adding printers manually.

    In other words - this is an issue for you because you want to make this an issue.

    Leave a comment:

  • Luke_Wolf
    Senior Member

  • Luke_Wolf
    replied
    Originally posted by erendorn View Post
    C) There are multiple printers on site because you work in place with more than 10 employees, and admins choose neither to add every frigging printer to every account/PC nor to add them after ticket request, since both the PCs and the printers are trusted and on the company's network and employees can certainly do that themselves.


    In other words, "it works for me so it must works for everyone", with a bit of "you're doing in wrong?".
    I'm a software dev not a sys admin so I may be offbase here but wouldn't the right way to handle that be to set up one computer (could even just be a virtual machine or jail/chroot on a local server) as a CUPS print server and then have all the other computers set up to talk to it, which will then go across the network to talk to your printers, that way configuration is centralized and everything.

    Leave a comment:

  • rdnetto
    Senior Member

  • rdnetto
    replied
    Originally posted by horizonbrave View Post
    the only thing I worry about openSUSE at this stage is how to prevent (in a default installation with a btrfs filesystem) the filesystem from overfilling with snapshots: will be snapper parameters be enough? I'm just surprised (I'm a linux noob) that the filesystem itself doesn't have mechanism for preventing such a scenario and related problems.
    There isn't much that can be done at the file system level - if you tell btrfs to create a snapshot, it will make sure to preserve that snapshot until you delete it. Given that it's snapper that automatically creates snapshots, it's Snapper's responsibility to clean them up as necessary.

    (There are some legitimate file-system level issues regarding determining how much free space is actually available, but I suspect Snapper takes those into account.)

    Originally posted by Chousuke View Post
    You should also note that snapshots don't actually consume any space (except for negligible metadata) and no copying will occur unless you're actually writing new data to the disk. Snapshots won't prevent space from being freed either, unless the "deleted" data is needed by snapshots.
    While I don't use OpenSUSE, I do snapshot my root FS everytime I do my weekly updates, and deleted files being kept around by old snapshots can be a real issue if you accidentally fill up your drive. (There's also some weirdness where you need to reboot (or remount? same thing for rootfs) the system after deleting snapshots before it realises it can use that space.) So while in theory snapshots don't consume any additional space, in practice they consume a size equal to all files changed by the updates + anything else that changed in the last week. (OpenSUSE avoids the latter by using a separate subvolume for everything, but I dislike that approach as it tends to make things unmanageably complex.)


    tldr; as long as you never cross 80% disk utilization with btrfs, you'll be fine.

    Leave a comment:

  • Espionage724
    Senior Member

  • Espionage724
    replied
    Originally posted by Slartifartblast View Post
    Easy, use EXT4
    XFS master-race

    That's one of the the neat things I like about openSUSE; it's easy to choose what filesystem you want (out of ext4, XFS, and Brtfs) to use without dealing with manual partitioning.

    Leave a comment:

  • horizonbrave
    Senior Member

  • horizonbrave
    replied
    Originally posted by Slartifartblast View Post
    Easy, use EXT4
    No thanks
    I just realised that btrfs+snapper is not all that pain/drama.. and still worth even with disabled snapshots: copy on write

    Leave a comment:

  • erendorn
    Senior Member

  • erendorn
    replied
    Originally posted by Luke_Wolf View Post
    You might as well say you have a gripe with Linux in general, I'd need to check (I haven't used printers in years) but I don't think there's a distro that doesn't work that way out of the box. You might be able to change that with policykit, but honestly it's a non-issue. Either A). the computer is someone else's property who doesn't trust you with admin access, and likely doesn't want you using your computer outside of the network and thus don't want you adding new printers. or B). You own the computer resource in which case you know the password and it's nothing more than a mild inconvenience.

    If you're the kind of individual who feels that your teenage daughter shouldn't have root access on her own laptop, then the only one you can blame is yourself when you have to go down to the school to type it in to allow the printer to be added.

    Also you don't need to enter a password to change networks, Networkmanager solved that problem years ago.
    C) There are multiple printers on site because you work in place with more than 10 employees, and admins choose neither to add every frigging printer to every account/PC nor to add them after ticket request, since both the PCs and the printers are trusted and on the company's network and employees can certainly do that themselves.


    In other words, "it works for me so it must works for everyone", with a bit of "you're doing in wrong?".

    Leave a comment:

  • Chousuke
    Junior Member

  • Chousuke
    replied
    Originally posted by Chousuke View Post
    I wouldn't worry too much about the snapshots. The system should warn you if disk space is low, in which case you can just manually delete snaphots if snappy doesn't handle expiring old snapshots automatically (which it probably does).

    You can also write a small script to clean old snapshots if space is low and run it periodically from cron.
    Replying to myself because edit timer expired:

    You should also note that snapshots don't actually consume any space (except for negligible metadata) and no copying will occur unless you're actually writing new data to the disk. Snapshots won't prevent space from being freed either, unless the "deleted" data is needed by snapshots.

    Leave a comment:

  • Chousuke
    Junior Member

  • Chousuke
    replied
    Originally posted by horizonbrave View Post
    the only thing I worry about openSUSE at this stage is how to prevent (in a default installation with a btrfs filesystem) the filesystem from overfilling with snapshots: will be snapper parameters be enough? I'm just surprised (I'm a linux noob) that the filesystem itself doesn't have mechanism for preventing such a scenario and related problems.
    Maybe a bit OT... of course all these coming updates are welcomed and as soon as it's available I'll give it a try, hopefully gnome will be nice and polished as in Fedora 22
    I wouldn't worry too much about the snapshots. The system should warn you if disk space is low, in which case you can just manually delete snaphots if snappy doesn't handle expiring old snapshots automatically (which it probably does).

    You can also write a small script to clean old snapshots if space is low and run it periodically from cron.

    Leave a comment:

  • nanonyme
    Senior Member

  • nanonyme
    replied
    Originally posted by Slartifartblast View Post
    Easy, use EXT4
    Well, once you run LVM2 under that to get the snapshotting, you're even worse off than before

    Leave a comment:

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