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openSUSE Tumbleweed Is Moving To Systemd's Journal, GNOME 3.16, Plasma 5

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  • openSUSE Tumbleweed Is Moving To Systemd's Journal, GNOME 3.16, Plasma 5

    Phoronix: openSUSE Tumbleweed Is Moving To Systemd's Journal, GNOME 3.16, Plasma 5

    The openSUSE Tumbleweed rolling-release distribution has already been using systemd for some time, but they've kept to using syslog for system messaging logging. However, that's going to change as Tumbleweed integrates systemd's journal...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...ystemd-Journal

  • #2
    Good investigation, as always ...

    There is no switch to systemd-journal in TW. Systemd-journal has been used since 13.2, which was released Nov. 4th, 2014.

    There was an upstream change in systemd 212, which changed the default value of ForwardToSyslog [1]. TW changed from systemd 210 to 219, so this change is included.

    [1] http://www.freedesktop.org/software/...rwardToSyslog=

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    • #3
      the only thing I worry about openSUSE at this stage is how to prevent (in a default installation with a btrfs filesystem) the filesystem from overfilling with snapshots: will be snapper parameters be enough? I'm just surprised (I'm a linux noob) that the filesystem itself doesn't have mechanism for preventing such a scenario and related problems.
      Maybe a bit OT... of course all these coming updates are welcomed and as soon as it's available I'll give it a try, hopefully gnome will be nice and polished as in Fedora 22

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      • #4
        My one gripe with Opensuse is their default security setup.

        I mean ffs I need to enter a password to hook up a printer or change networks?

        Yast needs to have a page where you can turn off security settings for individual components to make life easier.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by grndzro View Post
          My one gripe with Opensuse is their default security setup.

          I mean ffs I need to enter a password to hook up a printer or change networks?

          Yast needs to have a page where you can turn off security settings for individual components to make life easier.
          You might as well say you have a gripe with Linux in general, I'd need to check (I haven't used printers in years) but I don't think there's a distro that doesn't work that way out of the box. You might be able to change that with policykit, but honestly it's a non-issue. Either A). the computer is someone else's property who doesn't trust you with admin access, and likely doesn't want you using your computer outside of the network and thus don't want you adding new printers. or B). You own the computer resource in which case you know the password and it's nothing more than a mild inconvenience.

          If you're the kind of individual who feels that your teenage daughter shouldn't have root access on her own laptop, then the only one you can blame is yourself when you have to go down to the school to type it in to allow the printer to be added.

          Also you don't need to enter a password to change networks, Networkmanager solved that problem years ago.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by grndzro View Post
            My one gripe with Opensuse is their default security setup.

            I mean ffs I need to enter a password to hook up a printer or change networks?

            Yast needs to have a page where you can turn off security settings for individual components to make life easier.
            Fedora, and on a non-tweaked Arch setup with KDE or GNOME (I could be mistaken) do this as well. Only distro I'm aware of that doesn't require a password for network and printer changes is Ubuntu (and derivatives).

            How often are you changing/adding/removing printers though for a one-time password to be an issue? I'm also not aware of needing a password to change simple network options (IP address and etc, and wireless networks), but I could be wrong.

            I forget what issue I had with openSUSE, but it was my distro of choice for a good bit. Now I'm on Fedora, but one of these days I do plan on returning to TW (rolling release ftw). I'm over with using Ubuntu for the most part, but I find it interesting they still haven't fixed UEFI installations with Vivid.
            Last edited by Espionage724; 03 April 2015, 12:43 AM.

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            • #7
              GNOME 3.16 seems to also be on Tumbleweed now according to this G+ post.

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              • #8
                the news are misleading in whats going to happen to kde4. according to the mailing list discussion on factory they will not drop kde4 but change the default to plasma5 IF everything pans out as expected (no major features missing / no big bugs in plasma 5.3)

                cheers t

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by horizonbrave View Post
                  the only thing I worry about openSUSE at this stage is how to prevent (in a default installation with a btrfs filesystem) the filesystem from overfilling with snapshots: will be snapper parameters be enough? I'm just surprised (I'm a linux noob) that the filesystem itself doesn't have mechanism for preventing such a scenario and related problems.
                  Maybe a bit OT... of course all these coming updates are welcomed and as soon as it's available I'll give it a try, hopefully gnome will be nice and polished as in Fedora 22
                  It's curious if Btrfs snapshots are that expensive for you since it's CoW. Anyway, snapper indeed is pretty thoroughly configurable

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by horizonbrave View Post
                    the only thing I worry about openSUSE at this stage is how to prevent (in a default installation with a btrfs filesystem) the filesystem from overfilling with snapshots: will be snapper parameters be enough? I'm just surprised (I'm a linux noob) that the filesystem itself doesn't have mechanism for preventing such a scenario and related problems.
                    Easy, use EXT4

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