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Ubuntu Cloud Switches Over To Using Systemd By Default

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  • Ubuntu Cloud Switches Over To Using Systemd By Default

    Phoronix: Ubuntu Cloud Switches Over To Using Systemd By Default

    As of last night, the Ubuntu 15.04 Cloud daily ISOs have switched to booting with systemd by default rather than Upstart...

    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?pag...ystemd-Default

  • #2
    best get the popcorn ready if they're releasing 15.04 with this...

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    • #3
      Originally posted by stevenc View Post
      best get the popcorn ready if they're releasing 15.04 with this...
      Why is that? Didn't the esteemed forum members (zealots) here get all emotional over Ubuntu not using systemd? You'd think that they'd be appeased.

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      • #4
        excited

        I'm excited... Not so much for systemd(-init) (I liked the ideas behind upstart a bit better), but for:
        * less fragmentation between Linux distros
        * the journal. Which gives much better, more consistant information on the state of your PC.

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        • #5
          It's been the default in Debian sid/jessie for over a year? And still it's the cause of many release-blocker issues there; it's caused some users and developers to leave that distro. Ubuntu plan to switch to and be able to release with it in the space of about 6 weeks?

          Originally posted by dh04000 View Post
          idn't the esteemed forum members (zealots) here get all emotional over Ubuntu not using systemd? You'd think that they'd be appeased.
          Sure, among Ubuntu users there'll be some who were hyped about it but this could be the first time they've actually used it; some who specifically don't want it; and many who didn't know/care about it yet who are about to get a taste of it. This should be fun to watch.

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          • #6
            "Cloud is when somebody else reboots your machines."

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            • #7
              Finally! No more stupid upstart behavior. When I install something it doesn't mean I want to have it started automatically. When I want to disable some service I don't want to mess with stupid configuration files and put strange things in there. I want to be able to disable it via a simple command. Welcome, systemd. You're saving my time!

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Pawlerson View Post
                Finally! No more stupid upstart behavior. When I install something it doesn't mean I want to have it started automatically. When I want to disable some service I don't want to mess with stupid configuration files and put strange things in there. I want to be able to disable it via a simple command. Welcome, systemd. You're saving my time!
                you are a sysadmin that administrates cloud things ?

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by gens View Post
                  you are a sysadmin that administrates cloud things ?
                  No, just a power user who plays a lot with his computer.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by gQuigs View Post
                    I'm excited... Not so much for systemd(-init) (I liked the ideas behind upstart a bit better), but for:
                    * less fragmentation between Linux distros
                    * the journal. Which gives much better, more consistant information on the state of your PC.
                    only until you start digging into all the features. at that point upstart, sysv only exist as bad dream.

                    there is one other thing that will be really positive for move on systemd. it seems cockpit is receiving a lot of love for ubuntu too, at least on mailing list. cockpit is just awesome

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