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F2FS Might Get Enabled In Fedora

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  • F2FS Might Get Enabled In Fedora

    Phoronix: F2FS Might Get Enabled In Fedora

    On Sunday I wrote about how I found it surprising that Fedora didn't enable F2FS support within its Linux kernel while it packaged the user-space F2FS tools and contains plenty of other experimental/early-adoption features. The discussion resulting from this article about F2FS for Fedora has been both good and bad...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTg3MTM

  • #2
    What do you know, my suspicions were correct. Use common sense, folks.

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    • #3
      Thankfully!

      Thankfully they will enable it! Its not like we are looking to see it become the default. BTRFS will probably become the Fedora default in the next handful of releases.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by halfmanhalfamazing View Post
        Thankfully they will enable it! Its not like we are looking to see it become the default. BTRFS will probably become the Fedora default in the next handful of releases.
        that would be good, btrfs is in a ok state its very unlikely that it eats your data, but in some cases it maybe can produce verz slow results and high io. I dont think it will get much better in next years if it becomes not finaly the default os in big distros.

        The problems are all/most known so it just needs more developers to fix them. Maybe some better guides would help too, where should u use it where not... maybe also my boot scheme gets better support when its default (btrfs without partition on the ssd so that I dont have to grub-mkconfig ... every time I get a new kernel

        and also some better integration in other tools like the normal df tools.

        Dedub is also still a bit broken or you have to first activate it somehow (most likely because its broken) and stuff like that. Hope this small things (or are they big) get sorted out when more people using it.
        Last edited by blackiwid; 23 December 2014, 10:47 AM.

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        • #5
          A lot of shit hit the fan just because some kids who think they're cool cause they try to use bleeding-edge Fedora actually don't know how to build they own kernel and enable/disable any feature they want. LMAO

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          • #6
            Originally posted by asavah View Post
            A lot of shit hit the fan just because some kids who think they're cool cause they try to use bleeding-edge Fedora actually don't know how to build they own kernel and enable/disable any feature they want. LMAO
            End-users should NEVER be building their own kernel, and that should never be encouraged. If they really, seriously know what they are doing then that's fine but a misconfigured kernel leads to random bugs as it's impossible for the maintainers to test every combination of options. Years ago it might have been a different story but as the complexity of desktop OS's increases (which is necessary for end-users to be able to use the OS) the ability to hack different parts of the OS decreases. For servers obviously it's a different case but F2FS isn't even aimed at servers so that's not the topic at hand.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by asavah View Post
              A lot of shit hit the fan just because some kids who think they're cool cause they try to use bleeding-edge Fedora actually don't know how to build they own kernel and enable/disable any feature they want. LMAO
              My sentiments.

              Though I'd go one step further and say that any Linux user who does not know how to build at least one component of the Linux desktop OS stack (any component, not necessarily the kernel) is just a poser and a mooch.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Sonadow View Post
                My sentiments.

                Though I'd go one step further and say that any Linux user who does not know how to build at least one component of the Linux desktop OS stack (any component, not necessarily the kernel) is just a poser and a mooch.
                Just because somebody isn't contributing makes them a mooch? I guess that is basically the feeling the GPL gives off...but I don't think most people feel the same way. That is a little harsh.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by jimbohale View Post
                  What do you know, my suspicions were correct. Use common sense, folks.
                  You do understand that the Fedora kernel developers do not owe you, or anyone else for that matter, anything, right?
                  What you consider common sense != common sense for people who maintain the Fedora kernel.
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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by vadix View Post
                    Just because somebody isn't contributing makes them a mooch? I guess that is basically the feeling the GPL gives off...but I don't think most people feel the same way. That is a little harsh.
                    Where did I say anything about contributing?

                    I just said that they should know how to build at least 1 component of the desktop Linux stack. It can be anything from as major as building a component of X, or the kernel. Or it can be as simple as building a simple userspace program like an IRC client from the published source code. Building != contributing.

                    And in all seriousness, I fail to see how
                    Code:
                    ./configure --prefix=/home/<insert path>
                    make
                    make install
                    can be rocket science or geekspeak to any computer user.

                    The whole fun of Linux is the ability to build any component of the entire desktop OS and application stack at any point of time.

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