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V2 Of KDBUS Published For Linux Kernel Review

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  • V2 Of KDBUS Published For Linux Kernel Review

    Phoronix: V2 Of KDBUS Published For Linux Kernel Review

    The second revision to the Linux kernel based D-Bus implementation is now available for review...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTg0NTM

  • #2
    I like Andy Lutomirski:
    > + .starttime = current->start_time,

    I'm repeating myself here, but... why?

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    • #3
      Why not call the version it gets included in 4.0?
      If we get a complete set of ABIs we can elect to use it would probably be easier to understand for alot of people compared to just randomly some changes chamging the major version..
      Or is the something else that would seem downplayed by that? or may it just be a bit too "pro-Lennart" or something?

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      • #4
        Originally posted by nilssab View Post
        Why not call the version it gets included in 4.0?
        If we get a complete set of ABIs we can elect to use it would probably be easier to understand for alot of people compared to just randomly some changes chamging the major version..
        Or is the something else that would seem downplayed by that? or may it just be a bit too "pro-Lennart" or something?
        Linus Torvalds said a major version bump occurs when the minor version gets up to like 40. No major version bump based on features, google for more info from Torvalds.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by nilssab View Post
          Why not call the version it gets included in 4.0?
          If we get a complete set of ABIs we can elect to use it would probably be easier to understand for alot of people compared to just randomly some changes chamging the major version..
          Or is the something else that would seem downplayed by that? or may it just be a bit too "pro-Lennart" or something?
          As a followup to the first poster who replied to you... The only reason Linus dropped 2.6.x was because we hit like 2.6.39 and it just got unwieldy. 3.0 wasn't anything special or major, it was just another kernel version. Whenever Linus feels like the numbers are too stupidly high again we'll get 4.0 and then eventually 5.0. Its not based on features or ABI
          All opinions are my own not those of my employer if you know who they are.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by mark45 View Post
            Linus Torvalds said a major version bump occurs when the minor version gets up to like 40. No major version bump based on features, google for more info from Torvalds.
            IIRC he said that he doesn't like high numbers like 40, so 4.0 can be released instead 3.20. Unfortunatelly I can not find an email with this information on lkml.org

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            • #7
              Originally posted by michal View Post
              IIRC he said that he doesn't like high numbers like 40, so 4.0 can be released instead 3.20.
              Whih is what I said. And he also mentioned he won't do a major version bump because of any new functionality.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by michal View Post
                [?]so 4.0 can be released instead 3.20[?]
                In the back of my head I remember sth similar. There was also some thoughts about not adding features and focus on stability, but I am not sure. -- Well found it with this information: http://www.infoworld.com/article/261...-features.html But I think this is off the table, when there is no announcement yet and the commit window is closed in DRM next for new features and for all the other stuff it will close in a month or so.

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                • #9
                  But from 2.4 to 2.6 or from 2.2 to 2.4 the differences were tremendous, correct?

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Apopas View Post
                    But from 2.4 to 2.6 or from 2.2 to 2.4 the differences were tremendous, correct?
                    AFAIK, the Linux kernel's development process was different back then. Now it's much more of an evolutionary process than before. Revolutionary changes probably won't happen again.

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