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Systemd Continues Getting Bigger, Almost At 550k Lines Of Code

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  • #51
    Originally posted by berarma View Post
    ... comments likes those from you since I think they don't deserve them.
    in this case they do! .. in so many ways...

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    • #52
      Originally posted by Ericg View Post
      Not necessarily. Personally I like to write my little pet projects rather verbosely so that it's easier to debug and follow, and so if I don't look at it for months I can go back and pick it right up. Systemd devs could be the same way
      This is true, i'm the same way. But we are talking thousands and thousands of new lines of code guys.

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      • #53
        Originally posted by slojam View Post
        This is true, i'm the same way. But we are talking thousands and thousands of new lines of code guys.
        We're also talking about more than just one developer, and a very comprehensive project.

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        • #54
          Originally posted by randomizer View Post
          Agreed. They should have stopped after they got it printing "hello world".
          YES!! So to speak.. I thought it was a promising project at first, the way it was sold. An easier way to start services at boot time, and to control services. SysV init was working fine for me, but systemd sounded like a good idea. And the boot graph / timing thingy is pretty cool. But the /bin merge, and the new binary log-journal is where I started to grumble.. :/

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          • #55
            Originally posted by slojam View Post
            YES!! So to speak.. I thought it was a promising project at first, the way it was sold. An easier way to start services at boot time, and to control services. SysV init was working fine for me, but systemd sounded like a good idea. And the boot graph / timing thingy is pretty cool. But the /bin merge, and the new binary log-journal is where I started to grumble.. :/
            Are you talking about the /usr/bin + /bin merge? Because I'm pretty sure that was a decision Fedora made completely unrelated to systemd.

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            • #56
              reminds me of an old horror movie called the Blob. In the movie, there was a gelatinous monster that was absorbing everything it could eat and each time it was eating, it become bigger.

              Seriously, what was wrong with the existing dhcp packages that systemd fix and improve with their own version?

              Just trying to understand what they are trying to achieve. At some point, they need to draw a line where they say here: this is what systemd is for, nothing more.

              Now it is getting silly where everything gets absorbed into systemd.

              Just looking for systemd web browser and email client. (I wouldn't be even shocked to learn that it is already managing emails).

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              • #57
                Originally posted by Ancurio View Post
                Are you talking about the /usr/bin + /bin merge? Because I'm pretty sure that was a decision Fedora made completely unrelated to systemd.
                Installed arch in a vm a while ago to get a feel for the new world order. /bin, /sbin, and /usr/sbin are symlinks to /usr/bin which holds everything.
                Originally posted by lano1106 View Post
                Just looking for systemd web browser and email client. (I wouldn't be even shocked to learn that it is already managing emails).
                Fortunately there's no /etc/fstab.sqlite ...yet.

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                • #58
                  Originally posted by rice_nine View Post
                  Installed arch in a vm a while ago to get a feel for the new world order. /bin, /sbin, and /usr/sbin are symlinks to /usr/bin which holds everything.

                  Fortunately there's no /etc/fstab.sqlite ...yet.
                  The arch change has no connection to systemd. Some distributions including Fedora and Arch have merged but others haven't and systemd runs fine either way. I know you were joking but just FYI, systemd uses mount units and if /etc/fstab is used, mount units are automatically generated from it.

                  http://www.freedesktop.org/software/...generator.html

                  So there is no need for a sqlite database

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                  • #59
                    Originally posted by DanL View Post
                    So, you're free not to use it, but gnome is probably not the best desktop choice if you don't want to run it...
                    But don't fixate on Gnome as a unique case - they're merely the ones leading the charge. Don't be surprised to find KDE and others following the same trend, because they *have* expressed interest in using systemd-provided services, just as Gnome does now.

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                    • #60
                      Originally posted by Ericg View Post
                      Little misleading since its everything under the systemd umbrella. That being said, before someone freaks out: all features are modular and can freely be disabled at compile time except for core systemd and the journal
                      Lies. Systemd is advertised as modular but in practice it is not. Moreover systemd developers do everything in their power to ensure that it's as pervasive as possible (dbus, kdbus, journald, logind, etc.).

                      Systemd is cancer that is slowly killing Linux.
                      Last edited by prodigy_; 22 May 2014, 01:51 AM.

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