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Libav Merges Its Native Opus Decoder

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  • #11
    Ah, there we go. Opus defeating AAC in movies was the easiest path to mass adoption. I guess it'll have to make it the long and hard way.

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    • #12
      Originally posted by Prescience500 View Post
      Ah, there we go. Opus defeating AAC in movies was the easiest path to mass adoption. I guess it'll have to make it the long and hard way.
      Opus won't supplant AAC any more than vorbis supplanted mp3.

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      • #13
        Originally posted by mudig View Post
        A lot actually. I read somewhere on the internet that (at small bitrates or something) better sound quality has a bigger effect on viewer pleasure than better video quality, within bounds of course. So basically, to control bandwidth, keep sound quality at "CD quality" at all times and only adjust the video quality. That keeps viewer pleasure high. At least that's my interpretation. Opus makes that easier.
        Afaik that's how youtube works: video quality can go up & down, audio quality steady.

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        • #14
          Originally posted by DanL View Post
          Opus won't supplant AAC any more than vorbis supplanted mp3.
          You clearly know very little of Opus and the impact that it has had. It by no means with supplement; it will replace. Flac is the most popular lossless compession codec, and Opus is quickly becoming the most popular lossy codec. Technically speaking it is superior to all other lossy audio codecs.

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          • #15
            Originally posted by profoundWHALE View Post
            You clearly know very little of Opus and the impact that it has had. It by no means with supplement; it will replace. Flac is the most popular lossless compession codec, and Opus is quickly becoming the most popular lossy codec. Technically speaking it is superior to all other lossy audio codecs.
            +1
            but I think it will take 5-10 years for Opus to gain most of the lossy audio market share, for various reasons.
            Though among Linux users Opus will take over (over mp3, vorbis, etc) a lot sooner.

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            • #16
              Originally posted by profoundWHALE View Post
              You clearly know very little of Opus and the impact that it has had. It by no means with supplement; it will replace. Flac is the most popular lossless compession codec, and Opus is quickly becoming the most popular lossy codec. Technically speaking it is superior to all other lossy audio codecs.
              Supplant ~= replace. I don't think it was a typo in this case.

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              • #17
                Originally posted by mark45 View Post
                +1
                but I think it will take 5-10 years for Opus to gain most of the lossy audio market share, for various reasons.
                Though among Linux users Opus will take over (over mp3, vorbis, etc) a lot sooner.
                It depends where.

                Games are very slowly starting to use Opus currently. Very few engines and libraries can play these sounds.

                Music files (downloaded or bought) are almost never in Opus currently.

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                • #18
                  Originally posted by Nobu View Post
                  Supplant ~= replace. I don't think it was a typo in this case.
                  Originally posted by DanL View Post
                  Opus won't supplant AAC any more than vorbis supplanted mp3.
                  It's very clear that it was written from the belief that Opus will be as ineffective at gaining market share as Vorbis did.

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                  • #19
                    Originally posted by Calinou View Post
                    It depends where.

                    Games are very slowly starting to use Opus currently. Very few engines and libraries can play these sounds.

                    Music files (downloaded or bought) are almost never in Opus currently.
                    Indeed. Opus has a much lower starting latency than mp3 and most other codec. That's why it is very suitable for games (where you play small sounds but timing is important).
                    Also very good for adaptive bitrate changing (web streaming, and in particular voip).

                    For music collection, it's better than mp3 but not that much when using a modern mp3 encoder at very high bitrates (>200), and it's not really better than AAC.
                    So in this industry, the transition will probably be much slower, if it ever happens.

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                    • #20
                      Last time I checked Opus supported only mono and stereo. More channels can be added in container but Opus won't use any correlation between them for compression, it only can compress channels in pairs. That's not good for movies.

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