Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Old x86 Platforms To Be Removed With Linux 3.15

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Old x86 Platforms To Be Removed With Linux 3.15

    Phoronix: Old x86 Platforms To Be Removed With Linux 3.15

    While the Linux 3.15 kernel is introducing a large number of new features, it's also doing away with some old drivers and older x86 platforms...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTY1MTU

  • #2
    I hope in complete SSE2 linux operating systems to take advantages completely by parallel compute.

    Comment


    • #3
      Look out, honton might stop by to whine about feature removals!


      But in all seriousness, I think this is nice - the kernel could use some garbage collection. I highly doubt those CPUs could even handle the modern kernel anyway, and never heard of half of them.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by schmidtbag View Post
        Look out, honton might stop by to whine about feature removals!


        But in all seriousness, I think this is nice - the kernel could use some garbage collection. I highly doubt those CPUs could even handle the modern kernel anyway, and never heard of half of them.
        Actually those are mostly enterprise machines or high end workstations so you'd be wrong about them being able to handle a modern kernel.... its just that they require extra drivers and are extremely rare to see at all these days. I doubt they are removing support from all the Unisys ES7000 systems since unisys still makes system under that name and model just the 32bit ones... even the 32bit ones were quite powerful and example of the specs of a first gen ES7000 "ES7000/100 Series - (1999/2000) Support for 32 Xeon processors, 64 GB RAM, 96 PCI slots under Microsoft Windows NT EE and Windows 2000 DC"

        These would have been the driving force behind implementing PAE in pretty much any kernel...

        Comment


        • #5
          Well this is unfortunate. One of the benefits of Linux, to me at least, is being able to run a modern OS on unique vintage hardware. I've got an SGI VW540, fully loaded with Quad Xeons and 2 GB of RAM. Running Linux of course. The only other options for this machine are NT 4.0 or Windows 2000. Its not like everybodys kernel has support for this hardware compiled in. Why can't they leave it in place, but disabled by default, like most of the other drivers? I'm running Gentoo so I have to compile my own kernel anyhow.

          Comment


          • #6
            because someone has to maintain the crap - and more often than not these old semi-broken archs get into the way of new features or bug fixes.

            Nobody prevents you from running an old kernel.

            And since the hardware is old and the drivers are there, there is real reason for a new kernel. So... you are basically whining about a problem that does not exist.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by torsionbar28 View Post
              Well this is unfortunate. One of the benefits of Linux, to me at least, is being able to run a modern OS on unique vintage hardware. I've got an SGI VW540, fully loaded with Quad Xeons and 2 GB of RAM. Running Linux of course. The only other options for this machine are NT 4.0 or Windows 2000. Its not like everybodys kernel has support for this hardware compiled in. Why can't they leave it in place, but disabled by default, like most of the other drivers? I'm running Gentoo so I have to compile my own kernel anyhow.
              It's always possible to install previous compatible linux operating systems.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by torsionbar28 View Post
                Well this is unfortunate. One of the benefits of Linux, to me at least, is being able to run a modern OS on unique vintage hardware. I've got an SGI VW540, fully loaded with Quad Xeons and 2 GB of RAM. Running Linux of course. The only other options for this machine are NT 4.0 or Windows 2000. Its not like everybodys kernel has support for this hardware compiled in. Why can't they leave it in place, but disabled by default, like most of the other drivers? I'm running Gentoo so I have to compile my own kernel anyhow.
                Now's your last chance to complain you know. Send an email to lkml and the authors saying you're using it.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Brilliant

                  Originally posted by mail conversation
                  On Tue, Apr 1, 2014 at 8:52 PM, H. Peter Anvin <[email protected]> wrote:
                  > David Rientjes (2):
                  > x86, apic: Remove support for ia32-based Unisys ES7000
                  > x86, apic: Remove support for IBM Summit/EXA chipset
                  >
                  > H. Peter Anvin (2):
                  > x86, platforms: Remove SGI Visual Workstation
                  > x86, platforms: Remove NUMAQ

                  Nice try on April the 1st! Nobody's gonna notice ;-)

                  Gr{oetje,eeting}s,

                  Geert

                  --
                  Geert Uytterhoeven -- There's lots of Linux beyond ia32 -- [email protected]

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    i386 was dropped too, just wondering when i486 will be dropped too....
                    How many i486 systems in use today?

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X