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Systemd 210 Already Has Many Changes Piled Up

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  • tomtomme
    replied
    Originally posted by michal View Post
    So from my POV it's a bit surprising that Canonical maintains it. The only reasonable explenation for it is that Novel doesn't thread it as important and they don't really care about it's support.
    novell is out.
    http://www.itjungle.com/tfh/tfh052311-story10.html
    attachemate owns SUSE /openSUSE since 2011

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  • RahulSundaram
    replied
    Originally posted by michal View Post
    So from my POV it's a bit surprising that Canonical maintains it. The only reasonable explenation for it is that Novel doesn't thread it as important and they don't really care about it's support.
    http://news.cnet.com/8301-13580_3-9796140-39.html

    Most of the AppArmor developers left SUSE back in 2007. One or two of them were hired by Canonical soon after and it was merged upstream after that. SELinux is used by Fedora/RHEL and Android by default. AppArmor is used by SUSE and Ubuntu. SMACK is used in some mobile platforms including Tizen.

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  • renkin
    replied
    Originally posted by e8hffff View Post
    I really like SystemD on how you enable and disable processes but I feel the JournalCtl is lacking, or not dishing up. I feel fault finding is more difficult on SystemD setups than other mechanisms. These comments may not be founded but that's the impression I'm getting without proper research.
    I don't know if this would be considered "proper research" but Lennart has some useful examples on his blog.

    http://0pointer.de/blog/projects/journalctl.html

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  • maskimummu
    replied
    MSEC

    Originally posted by zanny View Post
    OpenSUSE still uses apparmor, as do Mageia and friends.
    Magiea uses MSEC which was developed by Mandriva a few years ago. AppArmor is not even in the Mageia repositories.

    Leave a comment:


  • e8hffff
    replied
    I really like SystemD on how you enable and disable processes but I feel the JournalCtl is lacking, or not dishing up. I feel fault finding is more difficult on SystemD setups than other mechanisms. These comments may not be founded but that's the impression I'm getting without proper research.

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by zanny View Post
    OpenSUSE still uses apparmor,
    So from my POV it's a bit surprising that Canonical maintains it. The only reasonable explenation for it is that Novel doesn't thread it as important and they don't really care about it's support.

    Leave a comment:


  • zanny
    replied
    Originally posted by michal View Post
    AppArmor is not really a Canonical thing. It was developed by Immunix/Novel and integrated into a OpenSuSE/SLES. But they migrated to SELinux AFAIK, so Canonical maintains AppArmor.
    OpenSUSE still uses apparmor, as do Mageia and friends. It is by far the most popular MAC.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by Rexilion View Post
    The AppArmor addition. Is that a Canonical thing? Would be cool.
    AppArmor is not really a Canonical thing. It was developed by Immunix/Novel and integrated into a OpenSuSE/SLES. But they migrated to SELinux AFAIK, so Canonical maintains AppArmor.

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  • psychoticmeow
    replied
    And just to make it hard for the trolls to pretend they've got facts on their side:

    - systemd-networkd is no longer statically enabled, but uses the usual [Install] sections so that it can be enabled/disabled using systemctl. It still is enabled by default however.
    In other words: behaves exactly like any other service, but still enabled by default unless a distro changes it during packaging.
    Last edited by psychoticmeow; 02-24-2014, 06:00 PM. Reason: NFI why I quoted GreatEmerald

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  • GreatEmerald
    replied
    SI prefixes for throughput? I always have SI prefixes for everything. The IEC prefixes are largely pointless in this day and age (the only place they still make sense is for RAM amounts). And at that they should be written with "i", instead of "32K" have "32Ki" if you want to mean multiples of 1024.

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