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A Self-Destruct Option For Linux Disk Encryption

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  • #11
    This reminds me of all the noise about rm -rf.
    Great job Kali, very welcome feature.

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    • #12
      what they need to do is a password which switches in a dummy near-empty file system which contains a bit of soft pr0n so as to give plausible deniability.

      some people may mock, but there are countries in the world where using disk encryption can result in an instant prison sentence if you don't immediately comply with the authorities, so having some dummy data is a good idea. Hence why trucrypt can have multiple hidden volumes.
      linux addict, got the scars, the grey beard and the t-shirt.

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      • #13
        What's it to be used for? If someone is telling you to put your password in so they can get at your files, or maybe several nuke passwords for someone to accidentally find when trying to decrypt a drive.
        Once people figure out this feature exists, the new standard operating procedure for this kind of thing will be "mirror the drive first."

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        • #14
          Originally posted by A Laggy Grunt View Post
          What's it to be used for?
          To nuke own data fast.

          Originally posted by A Laggy Grunt View Post
          If someone is telling you to put your password in so they can get at your files, or maybe several nuke passwords for someone to accidentally find when trying to decrypt a drive.
          You don't give access passwords all around. If you do, its your responsibility and your fault.

          Originally posted by A Laggy Grunt View Post
          Once people figure out this feature exists, the new standard operating procedure for this kind of thing will be "mirror the drive first."
          This was forensics 101 since forever, what are you questioning here?

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          • #15
            I implemented a similar feature to this in my local branch of Geli (the FreeBSD disk encryption framework). Granted, it's next to useless if you are under a very major investigation (wherein your disk is cloned first) but for other situations, e.g. 'spot checks', it's very useful to have. Nice to see it being implemented more widely.

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            • #16
              Originally posted by Tuxee View Post
              What makes you think this password is not configurable?
              He probably thought the password is "nuke"...

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              • #17
                Originally posted by speculatrix View Post
                what they need to do is a password which switches in a dummy near-empty file system which contains a bit of soft pr0n so as to give plausible deniability.

                some people may mock, but there are countries in the world where using disk encryption can result in an instant prison sentence if you don't immediately comply with the authorities, so having some dummy data is a good idea. Hence why trucrypt can have multiple hidden volumes.
                Truecrypt is very nice! I use it for backups of all my data. I don't have anything to hide other than financial data. So if a backup disk gets stolen, good luck getting my data!

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                • #18
                  Originally posted by Ericg View Post
                  What makes you think it wouldn't be configurable..? Like its so blatantly common sense that just saying that it might not be makes you come off.... lacking of common sense o.O
                  The article specifically says that the password is "nuke". Has anyone even read it? What a bunch of 1st grade kids.

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                  • #19
                    Originally posted by birdie View Post
                    The article specifically says that the password is "nuke". Has anyone even read it? What a bunch of 1st grade kids.
                    That would be really stupid. Are you really think the devs would be so stupid to make when you type nuke that will destroy your data -.-?

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                    • #20
                      Originally posted by birdie View Post
                      The article specifically says that the password is "nuke". Has anyone even read it? What a bunch of 1st grade kids.
                      Pay more attention. The quotes are not used in the means of "this is a literal string, which contents are "nuke"", but as "this is a metaphor of what it does, it doesn't literally nukes your hard drive, it does metaphorically "nukes" the contents". Proof: first time the word "nuke" appears in quotes, it says it's "a" nuke password. Why would Michael say "a" if there aren't SEVERAL possible ones?

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