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ZFS On Linux Is Now Set For "Wide Scale Deployment"

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by OpenSLOWlaris
    The same lie you spit out when trying to claim to kraftman that BSD devs are useful (when they are actually not). It's a Linux hacker that contribute LZ4. BSD contributed shit. They just use ZFS and stick with it like a man on the sinking ship.
    Kebbabert is a known troll, so it's useless to try arguing with him.

    Leave a comment:


  • kernelOfTruth
    replied
    Originally posted by kernelOfTruth View Post
    thanks a lot ryao !

    that's a more in-depth answer than I had anticipated


    I'm currently trying out ZFS/ZOL with lz4-algorithm on one of my backup disks and it looks good

    I see one issue which hinders me from using lz4 on my laptop / on the root partition: there's no liveCDs with ZOL available that support the LZ4 algorithm

    in case things go wrong I would have no access to my data at all if all partitions were using the LZ4 compression algorithm - am I correct ?

    seems like the problem took care of itself:

    http://mirror.de.sabayon.org/entropy...ges.db.pkglist

    ZFSonLinux 0.6.1 is hopefully included in Sabayon 13.04
    Last edited by kernelOfTruth; 03 May 2013, 05:39 PM.

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  • uid313
    replied
    Originally posted by kebabbert View Post
    True, ZFS is covered by patents.

    But it still open source under CDDL, and several OSes use it. FreeBSD can use it, why can not Linux use it? Mac OS X use it. All OpenSolaris distros use it. Also, Linux use it. Here are all OSes that use it, it is quite a list.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ZFS#Platforms
    Linux can use it through third-party distributed loadable kernel modules, or via FUSE.
    However, Linux does not have ZFS in the mainline kernel, due to CDDL being incompatible with the GNU General Public License (GPL), which is the license which Linux is distributed under.

    Leave a comment:


  • stevenc
    replied
    Originally posted by Candide View Post
    The question asked in this thread, "Will you use ZFS?"...
    Is there a Debian fork that has ZFS compiled in the kernel?
    Probably not what you had in mind, but since nobody else pointed it out yet, there's Debian GNU/kFreeBSD. ZFS comes as a zfsutils package and a loadable kernel module (because of the CDDL license - you should not use GPL-licensed kernel modules such as extfs at the same time).

    The installer for the Wheezy kfreebsd-amd64 release (this weekend!) allows to partition all/part of a disk for ZFS, then use it as root filesystem, as /home, /boot, or anything else. It will set up GRUB2 for you and load the zfs.ko module automatically.

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  • kebabbert
    replied
    Originally posted by uid313 View Post
    Interesting post.
    It is too bad ZFS is covered by patents, and that it is not available under the BSD license or GPL.
    True, ZFS is covered by patents.

    But it still open source under CDDL, and several OSes use it. FreeBSD can use it, why can not Linux use it? Mac OS X use it. All OpenSolaris distros use it. Also, Linux use it. Here are all OSes that use it, it is quite a list.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ZFS#Platforms

    Leave a comment:


  • uid313
    replied
    Originally posted by kebabbert View Post
    Those of you who say that ZFS is closed source: it is not. ZFS have been forked, and the Oracle ZFS is closed source, yes. The Illumos (Solaris kernel) have forked ZFS and it is completely open sourced under CDDL. Several OSes use ZFS today: FreeBSD, Mac OS X (Z-410), OpenSolaris, etc.

    Both of the head architects of ZFS have quit Sun and one of the them have joined Joyent who also created nodejs. All DTrace creators have joined Joyent too. They work on Illumos, and Joyent has the strongest Solaris kernel hackers outside Oracle. Illumos have several new ZFS functions that even Oracle Solaris does not have. Some believe that Illumos ZFS will surpass Oracle Solaris. Also, a FreeBSD hacker have coded up LZ4 compression algorithm, which is very clever. So, there is lot of momentum in open source ZFS outside Oracle Solaris.

    BTW, the well known compression algorithm lzjb (lzJB) is named after Jeff Bonwick, the other head architect of ZFS. Matt Ahrens at Joyent is the other.
    Interesting post.
    It is too bad ZFS is covered by patents, and that it is not available under the BSD license or GPL.

    Leave a comment:


  • kebabbert
    replied
    ZFS is open source

    Those of you who say that ZFS is closed source: it is not. ZFS have been forked, and the Oracle ZFS is closed source, yes. The Illumos (Solaris kernel) have forked ZFS and it is completely open sourced under CDDL. Several OSes use ZFS today: FreeBSD, Mac OS X (Z-410), OpenSolaris, etc.

    Both of the head architects of ZFS have quit Sun and one of the them have joined Joyent who also created nodejs. All DTrace creators have joined Joyent too. They work on Illumos, and Joyent has the strongest Solaris kernel hackers outside Oracle. Illumos have several new ZFS functions that even Oracle Solaris does not have. Some believe that Illumos ZFS will surpass Oracle Solaris. Also, a FreeBSD hacker have coded up LZ4 compression algorithm, which is very clever. So, there is lot of momentum in open source ZFS outside Oracle Solaris.

    BTW, the well known compression algorithm lzjb (lzJB) is named after Jeff Bonwick, the other head architect of ZFS. Matt Ahrens at Joyent is the other.

    Leave a comment:


  • Rallos Zek
    replied
    Originally posted by finalzone View Post
    That was a deliberate decision from SUN when they were losing their market share against Linux system especially IBM and Red Hat.
    As a result, binary ZFS on Linux cannot legally included out of box nor integrated into Linux kernel. When Oracle will decide to change ZFS license for GPL compatibility (unlikely), then it can. For now, ZFS is a legal minefield that out-weights its technical merit.

    Amen!

    Originally posted by Sergio View Post
    I would love to see Linux adopting ZFS as 'standard'; I though free/open source was all about merithocracy...
    Not going to happen until ZFS is GPL which is maybe never. The CDDL is made as a fuck you to the Linux community, as such I say fuck you to the CDDL and ZFS.

    Leave a comment:


  • kernelOfTruth
    replied
    ryao, you by chance know if suspend-to-ram, so freezing of the filesystem's contents, work with ZFS (I doubt it - but it would be a pleasant surprise)

    Leave a comment:


  • kernelOfTruth
    replied
    Originally posted by kernelOfTruth View Post
    not exactly sure what's going on here:

    I created the pool with sub-pools/volumes and copied already some data to it (around 800 GB), exported it

    booted into windows


    now came back to linux and wanted to import it:





    these are pools with compress=lz4 set

    I reproducibly got the same error when creating a new pool and after exporting trying to re-import it


    any ideas ?



    this is on an GPT partition table -> partition

    might that be the reason ?


    edit:


    the same happens when using lzjb



    found the reason:

    I was testing the live ebuild and some recent changes might have caused this

    now using "stable" 0.6.1 release and everything's fine



    so a heads-up - something could be broken/regression in the current developmental state

    Leave a comment:

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