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Systemd 199 Has Its Own D-Bus Client Library

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  • GreatEmerald
    replied
    Originally posted by schmalzler View Post
    2013. Tested with pulseaudio-2.1 and 3.0, systemd-196, gnome-3.6.3, most recent kernel at that moment.
    It did not crackle with every media. Mp3, Ogg, etc. were just fine. I was really pleased about that (already had pulseaudio-1.x on my system, which produced high CPU load, really bad sound etc.).
    The only files that made trouble were .mkv's I had generated from my DVDs. And they are essential for me during winter

    And IMHO packages should contain a usable default configuration. Anytime I read "if pulseaudio does not work it's the fault of your distribution - it should configure pulseaudio to its needs." I'm getting mad. There were times certain distributions configured kde to their needs and introduced silly bugs. KDE makes a point of a good default configuration. You don't have to like it (oxygen style or color scheme) but it is not buggy.
    So what distribution was that? If you try one that already uses systemd and PulseAudio (which is the vast majority of them), you should see that such problems are not there, hence the problem was misconfiguration.

    For PA defaults, it depends on your individual sound card drivers. Some simply can't work with timer-based scheduling, for instance. Some, on the contrary, only work with it. Some processors can handle the best audio resampling quality, some are not powerful enough. So there is no way to set perfect defaults for everything.

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  • Teho
    replied
    systemd 200 has been released with couple of changes.

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  • Teho
    replied
    Originally posted by schmalzler View Post
    And IMHO packages should contain a usable default configuration. Anytime I read "if pulseaudio does not work it's the fault of your distribution - it should configure pulseaudio to its needs."
    To my understanding the configuration problems refer to external packages (Java for example) and not PulseAudio itself (excluding the early Ubuntu releases). I don't think any(?) distribution tinkers much with the defaults.

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  • schmalzler
    replied
    Originally posted by GreatEmerald View Post
    Which year was that?
    2013. Tested with pulseaudio-2.1 and 3.0, systemd-196, gnome-3.6.3, most recent kernel at that moment.
    It did not crackle with every media. Mp3, Ogg, etc. were just fine. I was really pleased about that (already had pulseaudio-1.x on my system, which produced high CPU load, really bad sound etc.).
    The only files that made trouble were .mkv's I had generated from my DVDs. And they are essential for me during winter

    And IMHO packages should contain a usable default configuration. Anytime I read "if pulseaudio does not work it's the fault of your distribution - it should configure pulseaudio to its needs." I'm getting mad. There were times certain distributions configured kde to their needs and introduced silly bugs. KDE makes a point of a good default configuration. You don't have to like it (oxygen style or color scheme) but it is not buggy.

    Leave a comment:


  • duby229
    replied
    Just because you have a lot of RAM doesnt mean that OS needs to use it all up. RAM is for applications,.... I assume you don't let your computer idle while watching memory utilization max out and think "WOW!! That's soooo coooool!!!!"

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  • DeepDayze
    replied
    Originally posted by frign View Post
    No, it actually isn't. It is my hobby to optimise computer systems and I am currently working on eudev (Gentoo fork) to make it more efficient. No one has to go this extreme, but it is fun to break the barriers.
    Today's OS's are memory-hogs and we should not start to waste so many ressources just because they are available, we should work on optimising current systems so they can bring even more performance.
    Good point that's still valid for the majority of the older systems still chugging along...386s anyone?

    Leave a comment:


  • movieman
    replied
    Pulseaudio's main problem was that Ubuntu pushed it out to end users before it was ready for prime time (and I complained about it plenty myself). Now it works pretty well on every system where I've tried it, and much better than older Linux audio interfaces.

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  • JanC
    replied
    Originally posted by frign View Post
    However, most problems you addressed with ALSA have been in regards to those during the transition-phase from OSS to ALSA, when ALSA was still buggy and lagging features. It now _does_ support bluetooth through "bluez", it definitely has been fixed in regards to io-routing and it is not a big bloated hog clobbering the user-space, being well-integrated into the Kernel.
    ALSA itself has supported Bluetooth & the like for quite some time, but most userspace applications used ALSA in a way that didn't work (well) with Bluetooth, and those same applications also didn't work well with PulseAudio's ALSA emulation.

    So, if anything, PulseAudio probably helped to fix a lot of those applications (if 80% of your users use PA & complain, that's harder to ignore than those 2% bluetooth users before).

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  • Teho
    replied
    The PulseAudio debugging should probably be done on some other thread. Reporting it to PulseAudio's or distribution's bug tracker might also make sense.

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  • Ericg
    replied
    Originally posted by TAXI View Post
    For a long time I'm wondering what's wrong with my setup. Google didn't help.

    This is with a emu10k1 card (SB Live! 5.1 Dell OEM [SB0228]).

    I'm happy for any help with this.
    Speaking of which... TAXI, sorry we like completly ignored you. I do want to help you though. What distro are you? What version of Pulseaudio? By "SB LIVE!" I'm assuming youre using a SoundBlaster card?

    Leave a comment:

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